Happy Endings Questions and Answers

Happy Endings

Atwood has several purposes in this "story." One is to investigate the nature of plots. Atwood suggests that plots are circular, and while there can be many variations on the story of Madge, Mary,...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2020 1:18 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Happy Endings

Margaret Atwood's story "Happy Endings" is titled as such to make an ironic statement on the nature of conventional marriage. In the story, John and Mary get married, and after the initial...

Latest answer posted January 1, 2011 10:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

Margaret Atwood's metafictional piece "Happy Endings" takes readers through a series of basic plots, any of which could become the core of a short story or novel. By examining various plots which...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2019 4:58 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

In "Happy Endings," Margaret Atwood uses the "choose your own adventure" trope—popular in the 1980s, when her short story was written—to highlight and satirize gender roles in traditional Western...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2020 2:45 am UTC

4 educator answers

Happy Endings

This is always a question you should consider when you read a story, especially a story that you are reading with a critical eye. It is one of the first choices an author has to make -- "Who is...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2011 10:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

From your thesis, it is clear that you have a solid grasp on this fascinating story. I would, however, look at shortening your thesis slightly (specifically your description of your theme) to...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2018 12:24 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Happy Endings

A classic example of metafiction, Atwood's "Happy Endings" is a short story that teaches readers about the importance of a good plot in fiction, as well as the importance, or rather the...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2021 9:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

Margaret Atwood's short story "Happy Endings" is a classic example of metafiction. Metafiction is a form of storytelling that comments on narrative convention—a story that knows it's a story....

Latest answer posted June 17, 2020 7:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

Atwood's "Happy Endings" suggests that the elements we consider important to having a satisfying life are all absurd. In story A, John and Mary appear to be happy because they possess the "ideal"...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2011 5:37 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

I would like to add how these two different points of view are specifically used in the story. The third-person omnisicient point of view allows Atwood to know about what all of her characters are...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2007 8:12 am UTC

2 educator answers

Happy Endings

For Atwood in "Happy Endings," all plots can be reduced the basic elements she outlines. The endings are not that different from one another in exploring the narrative between two people with...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2014 1:29 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Happy Endings

Margaret Atwood has remarked that that she had never heard the term “metafiction” when she wrote “Happy Endings” and was a little disappointed that there was “a name for such aberrations.” The...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2019 6:22 am UTC

4 educator answers

Happy Endings

Great discussion board question!I believe Atwood is using sarcasm to say that plots can only go a certain number of ways, and those ways, she describes in all of her scenarios in "Happy...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2008 9:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

In this piece of metafiction, Margaret Atwood makes the point that "what" happens in a life or a story, the plot, is of little importance because all plots, whether in life or in fiction that...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2017 2:27 am UTC

2 educator answers

Happy Endings

Margaret Atwood's point in this postmodern story is that all stories end the same way. As the narrator puts it, The only authentic ending is the one provided here ... John and Mary die. John and...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2021 1:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

In order to write a compelling thesis statement, you must develop a position on some arguable point in regard to the text. In part F of "Happy Endings," Atwood (or her narrator) concludes by...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2016 6:54 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Happy Endings

The story is all about the artificiality of “story” as a way of organizing experience. Atwood‘s comment at the end is that the only “real” ending is that “John and Mary die,” suggesting that the...

Latest answer posted June 7, 2018 1:22 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Happy Endings

One similarity between the characters in Margaret Atwood's short story "Happy Endings" and the characters in O. Henry's short story "The Gift of the Magi" concerns the fact that they all value...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2016 12:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

This is a "G" ending. After college, John finds a good job in the telecommunications business. He is the assistant to Mary who is the morning news anchor for a national network. Initially, John...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2013 3:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

To some extent, the various scenarios that make up Margaret Atwood's "Happy Endings" are less important than how they end. Whether the variations on John and Mary's relationship are happy or sad,...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2021 8:33 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

In her story, "Happy Endings," Margaret Atwood explains to writers that there aren't many different plots--most of them end up the same way (people die). She shows through her different stories...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2016 3:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

The original question had to be edited. I think that Atwood includes the reader at the end of the work to involve us in the critical thinking process that satirizes the typically "Romantic" notion...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2013 11:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

One of the main messages that the author, Margaret Atwood, is trying to send, is that every story ultimately ends the same way, with death. John and Mary go through a variety of different versions...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2009 12:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

The first story in Atwood's "Happy Endings" suggests that readers want to be hooked by the "how" and "why" of events and characters in a story. By the end of section A, the reader learns that John...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2011 5:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

"Happy Endings" is more about life's endings and not so much about happiness in between life's beginnings and life's endings. Happiness in life is more a consideration of the "How and Why" with...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2011 5:52 am UTC

4 educator answers

Happy Endings

To start thinking about what plot has to do with Atwood's fun little story "Happy Endings," consider what a plot is. A plot is part of a story, and specifically, it is the way events are arranged...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2007 4:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

There is a plot summary here that should be very helpful to you http://www.enotes.com/happy-endings/11116

Latest answer posted March 28, 2007 11:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

In "Happy Endings" Margaret Atwood uses punctuation in some unusual ways throughout her story about exploring the "What" ("just one thing after another, a what and a what and a what") of story plot...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2010 10:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

There are a couple of ways to approach this question because of the unique form of Atwood's short story "Happy Endings." The first possible seed sentence is the set of lines that opens the story,...

Latest answer posted December 31, 2018 4:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Happy Endings

This is a great discussion board question!Atwood is most likely being sarcastic, poking fun at the Canadian stereotypes that some people attribute to Canadians. The whole story is rather...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2008 9:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer