Guns, Germs, and Steel Questions and Answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Jared Diamond’s thesis in Guns, Germs, and Steel is that the countries of the world that became rich and powerful did so because of geographical luck. These countries did not become rich and...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2014 9:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In Guns, Germs, and Steel, we discover that writing systems, however primitive and undeveloped, gave certain civilizations a distinct advantage over others. The development of written systems gave...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2020 10:51 am UTC

6 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Jared Diamond asks why different civilizations on different continents developed at different rates. Why did, for example, mass production of bronze tools occur in Eurasia more than five thousand...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2018 6:17 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Diamond argues that the "neolithic transition" from food gathering to agriculture evolved gradually, with long periods in which the two modes of food provision coexisted. Several different factors...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2017 2:49 am UTC

2 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

You can find Diamond’s discussion of what he calls the “Great Leap Forward” beginning on p. 39 of Guns, Germs, and Steel. The Great Leap Forward was a time when human culture really took off....

Latest answer posted August 23, 2015 1:54 am UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In chapter one of Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, the author, a professor of geography, discusses the early evolution of human beings and the transformative...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2017 5:29 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In Chapter 9 of Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond discusses the six main characteristics necessary for an animal to be domesticated successfully. Captive breeding: Some animals breed easily in...

Latest answer posted August 27, 2018 4:43 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

As Jared Diamond explains in the prologue to his famous book Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, Yali, a local politician, asks his question while they are strolling on a beach in...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2019 12:38 am UTC

4 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Diamond's thesis is, as he writes in the prologue to Guns, Germs, and Steel: History followed different courses for different peoples because of differences between peoples' environments, not...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2019 5:42 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In the Pulitzer-prize winning book Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, author Jared Diamond argues that environmental differences rather than inherent differences between races...

Latest answer posted September 27, 2019 2:51 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Guns, Germs, and Steel is a work of synthesis. Diamond tries to bring together the work of scholars in such disciplines as anthropology, evolutionary biology (his own field), and history in order...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2017 5:18 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond begins with a personal anecdote. Diamond is an American scientist with degrees in anthropology and biology who is very interested in how geography and...

Latest answer posted September 12, 2017 11:32 am UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Yali's question is essentially "Why did white Europeans become so much more powerful than other peoples?" Diamond rephrases this question by asking "why did human development proceed at such...

Latest answer posted September 15, 2019 2:22 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Yali is described by Diamond in the Prologue to Guns, Germs, and Steel as a "remarkable local politician" in New Guinea, where the author was doing field research on bird evolution. Diamond writes...

Latest answer posted September 10, 2019 2:16 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In Jared Diamond's book Guns, Germs, and Steel, he talks about an encounter he had with a Guinean chief named Yali. Yali asks the now famous question, "Why is it that you white people developed so...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2019 8:02 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Diamond's overall argument is framed as a response to what he identifies in the Prologue as "Yali's question." Yali, a man from New Guinea, posed his question to Diamond when the author was...

Latest answer posted May 18, 2019 5:24 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In the prologue to his famous book Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fate of Human Societies, Jared Diamond credits Yali's question with providing the impetus for the research that led to writing this...

Latest answer posted February 6, 2019 1:37 am UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Yali's question has to do with the differences in how human society has evolved. Why did people in Europe or the Middle East develop agriculture and advanced technologies while people in New...

Latest answer posted January 12, 2020 3:35 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

The big question that Jared Diamond is posing is an expansion of one that was asked of him. This is usually referred to as “Yali’s question,” based on a passage in which Diamond converses with a...

Latest answer posted October 30, 2018 6:47 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In the now-classic study Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, Jared Diamond argues that some civilizations developed technology and power more quickly than others not because of...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2020 5:39 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In his book, Diamond differentiates between proximate and ultimate factors contributing to the success of the Spanish conquest. Factors that he identifies as proximate included writing, the...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2018 10:33 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In Chapter 8 of Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond is trying to explain why farming arose in some areas of the world and not in others. He says that there are many areas of the world that are...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2014 2:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

The characteristics of an epidemic disease are: the speed with which they spread how long it takes to recover or die whether the disease grants immunity and whether the disease has human hosts...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2017 1:37 am UTC

2 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

According to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary, there are several definitions for the word "universal" when it is used as an adjective. The one that would be applicable to this question would...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2019 6:10 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

I do not know if this question is meant to refer to Jared Diamond’s book Guns, Germs, and Steel, but it is certainly possible to find an answer to the question in that book. Diamond specifically...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2016 7:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

The answer to this can be found in the Prologue of Guns, Germs, and Steel. Specifically, it can be found towards the bottom of p. 25 in the paperback edition of the book. Diamond says that...

Latest answer posted September 3, 2013 3:09 am UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Another problem with the Phaistos disk is that it was indecipherable by anyone who followed after the maker created it; therefore, it was discarded. But, the argument of Diamond that because the...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2015 3:11 am UTC

2 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Diamond’s book is meant to answer a simple question put to him by a politician from Papua New Guinea: given than Europeans and New Guineans are equally smart, why is it that Europeans have so much...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2017 11:20 am UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond does not really use the terms “winners” and “losers.” However, we can clearly apply these terms to different groups of people in the world. To Diamond,...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2015 5:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

The question that you ask here is actually the central question of Guns, Germs, and Steel. This exact question can be found on p. 16 of the book. The brief answer is that human development...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2016 11:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In his 1997 book, Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, Jared Diamond posits at least six sets of environmental variables among Polynesian islands that contributed to the...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2018 5:39 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

The answer to this is found on p. 129 in my book. Basically, the answer is that bitterness in almonds is controlled by only one gene. In oak trees, by contrast, the bitterness of acorns is...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2010 2:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Jared Diamond posits that certain societies had a distinctive advantage based on geography. A first, extremely fortunate aspect of Middle Eastern geography was the existence in the Fertile Crescent...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2021 3:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

I am not certain how to identify exactly three factors that Diamond cites in Guns, Germs, and Steel that separated the world’s haves from the have-nots. If I had to identify exactly three, I would...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2016 9:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Chapter 14 of Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs and Steel, titled “From Egalitarianism to Kleptocracy,” focuses primarily on the development of political entities as concentrations of humans grew in...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2014 1:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In the seminal work Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fate of Human Societies, author Jared Diamond refutes the notion that some races are more inherently talented than others and instead offers evidence...

Latest answer posted September 29, 2018 5:35 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In the prologue, Diamond differentiates between the proximate and ultimate causes of why Europe developed differently than other areas of the world and why Europeans were able to dominate other...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2017 9:53 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

The event at Cajamarca that Jared Diamond discusses in Guns, Germs, and Steel was the first meeting between the Inca emperor Atahuallpa and Francisco Pizarro and his invading army of Spaniards....

Latest answer posted August 2, 2016 3:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Among the many claims that Diamond makes in Guns, Germs, and Steel is the argument that the development of agriculture occurred first in Eurasia because those continents lie on an east-west axis...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2019 12:02 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Yali, who is Jared’s friend, asked him a question that formed the basis of Jared’s research and development of the book Guns, Germs and Steel. As captured in the prologue, Yali, who is from New...

Latest answer posted August 17, 2015 11:11 am UTC

3 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

The answer to this can be found in the Epilogue. Specifically, it can be found on pages 410 and 411 of the paperback edition of the book. As with so much else in this book, the answer is to be...

Latest answer posted September 15, 2013 3:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

There are many reasons that Jared Diamond presents to explain why Europeans were able to defeat Native Americans militarily. You can find these reasons presented throughout Chapter 3, in which...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2015 4:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond describes it as an accident of history and geography that the Spanish soldiers who came to Peru with Pizarro were equipped with guns while the Inca people...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2021 1:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Okay, you're asking for quite a bit here. What I'm going to do is give you a bit of help with his thesis first of all: His thesis is that Europeans came to be more powerful than other people...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2009 8:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

You can answer this question by reading in Chapter 11. There, Diamond tells us that civilization leads to epidemic diseases because it creates large pools of hosts for diseases and it puts them in...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2012 3:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In this answer, I will present three main arguments that Diamond makes in Guns, Germs, and Steel that are all pieces of support for his main overall argument. In other words, these three arguments...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2015 5:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

The answer to this can be found in Chapter 15. Specifically, it can be found on pages 311 through 313 of the paperback edition. The question you ask is taken verbatim from p. 311 and the answer...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2013 5:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

In the prologue, Yali asks Diamond three questions: 1) He wanted to know about Diamond's work on guinea birds and how much he was compensated for it. 2)He wanted to know how his people came to...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2016 3:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Guns, Germs, and Steel

The emergence of agriculture and animal domestication led to the creation of larger social groups because a stable food supply improved nutrition leading to better health and longer lifespans of...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2015 10:47 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Guns, Germs, and Steel

Assuming that Diamond's overall thesis is that Europe came to dominate for geographical reasons, not "racial" ones. Point 1: Eurasia had "better" kinds of plants that allowed for the onset of...

Latest answer posted October 25, 2009 7:54 am UTC

1 educator answer

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