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  • Gulliver's Travels
    The Houyhnhnms are a race of rational, civilized horses that Gulliver encounters when he reaches Houyhnhnm Land. To a large extent, they represent the better part of human nature, with the Yahoos...

    Asked by kgustafson2018 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Jonathan Swift satirizes English society—particularly the political and theological disputes of his own period—through his description of the Lilliputians. Gulliver learns that despite their...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Satire is a form of writing where an author uses humor and/or irony to critique a people group; it is often used to comment on political groups. In this dialogue, King Brobdingnag asks Gulliver a...

    Asked by navarrolupita352 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    In part 3, chapter 1 of Gulliver's Travels our hero has set sail once again, this time aboard the Hopewell. Unfortunately, the voyage turns out to be a bit of a disaster. First, the ship is blown...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    On Brobdingnag, Gulliver receives the dubious honor of being invited to an execution. Gulliver's normally averse to such grisly spectacles, but his curiosity gets the better of him and he agrees to...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver has been accused by a number of scheming Lilliputian politicians and courtiers of treason. Gulliver thought he was doing the right thing by not seizing the entire Blefuscan fleet, but,...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    The king of Brobdingnag discusses England, Gulliver's home, with Gulliver at great length. Gulliver delights in telling him about the British government, about British courts and laws, and even...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Irony occurs when there is some discrepancy between what we expect and what the reality is. We do not really expect Gulliver to end up in locations where human beings are so very different,...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Swift was criticized for his satire because the novel itself is highly critical of the English government and English customs, the country's religious struggles, the monarchy's handling of those...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver's Travels is a satirical work, and its main target is the experimental science promoted by Enlightenment thinkers such as Sir Isaac Newton. The Enlightenment was marked by a particular...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver thinks that the king of Brobdingnag is pretty simple; he does not really understand the way the world works. Gulliver says, [The king] wondered to hear me talk of such chargeable and...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Both Samuel Pepys and Jonathan Swift wrote with little embellishment, Pepys from a literal vantage point and Swift from a figurative one. In both Pepys' diary and Swift's Gulliver's Travels, there...

    Asked by lmcecil02 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    The short answer is that the dwarf that lives in the Brobdingnagian court hates Gulliver because Gulliver has usurped his place as the shortest person in Brobdingnag. Gulliver says that the dwarf,...

    Asked by user1404594 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver actually escapes from Lilliput fairly easily: after falling out of favor with the Emperor of Lilliput, Gulliver walks across the channel separating Lilliput from Blefuscu, and then from...

    Asked by sarbanimehta on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Gulliver's Travels
    A character sketch outlines the nature of a character in a work of literature. Any assertions made about the character must be illustrated with quotes (or paraphrases) from the work to support your...

    Asked by mleena330 on via web

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  • Gulliver's Travels
    The Lilliputians are very warlike while the society of Brobdingnag is quite peace-loving and gentle, especially in comparison to the society of Lilliput. In Lilliput, terrible wars have been...

    Asked by meerakale3776 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Firstly, the emperor of Lilliput is cautious. Although Gulliver signals that he desires his liberty when he is awakens to find himself bound on the beach, the emperor will not consent to give him...

    Asked by user7941756 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    It is difficult to narrow down the scope of this satire to just one idea, but, broadly speaking, we could say that the major theme of Gulliver's Travels is that human beings are inherently flawed....

    Asked by pavanivaligi6 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Despite ruling a physically isolated kingdom that has no real need to be concerned with anyone else because it has no neighbors, the king of Brobdingnag is very interested to learn about the laws...

    Asked by preethise on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver escapes from Lilliput by, first, visiting Blefuscu. He is treated very well there, and the king does not seem nearly as warlike and unreasonable as the emperor of Lilliput. Gulliver learns...

    Asked by krishbaskar2002 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Gulliver's Travels
    In Lilliput, Gulliver finds that he is ten times the height of the average native. The Lilliputians prove themselves to be, in many ways, warlike and intolerant: one especially vitriolic...

    Asked by altonjavier on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    In Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift, Gulliver begins his story with a little about his background. He was the middle boy of five sons and was taken in as an apprentice to a London surgeon....

    Asked by phanindramadala on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver has a mild and fair disposition, which he exhibits when he is with the Lilliputians. When they have tied him up, he thinks that he can easily free himself from their chains, as they are so...

    Asked by user565714 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Based on some of his experiences with the Lilliputians, Gulliver is revealed to be rather dim-witted. He cannot understand the ways in which his behavior -- especially urinating on the castle in...

    Asked by alkakashyap03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    During his stay in Lilliput, Gulliver is given the name "Quinbus Flestrin" by the tiny Lilliputians. According to Swift, this name means something along the lines of "the Man-Mountain" or "the...

    Asked by akshiarun on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    As the third of five sons, Gulliver must forge his own path in the world. His father helps him to get a good education so that he can become a doctor. Gulliver apprentices for some four years...

    Asked by cutetarun5 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Gulliver's Travels
    In Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift pokes satirical jabs at most aspects of European life, including religion. Swift's parody of 18th century religion is most evident in Gulliver's first voyage,...

    Asked by user2284243 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    The Emperor of Lilliput is described as being a little taller than his subjects and generally handsome. However, he's also proud, petty, swayed by corruption, and preoccupied with meaningless...

    Asked by meenalparchani on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    It can be hard to define a reader’s “attitude” toward a character or characters. Attitudes are subject to all sorts of influences, some contained in the text, others caused by real life...

    Asked by laurazazanis on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver decides that the Lilliputians are good mathematicians because of their ability to accurately calculate his size, clothing needs, and food requirements. I would tend to agree with...

    Asked by tanishaagarwal2002 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Lemuel Gulliver is the main character in Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, and so he merits special attention when approaching the novel. For the most part, Gulliver is thoroughly normal; he...

    Asked by jaspreet0800 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Gulliver's Travels
    The Lilliputians are clever and inventive in that they do devise a way of subduing Gulliver when he first arrives on their shores as well as of moving him from the beach to the city. He is so much...

    Asked by ghayasji on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    The emperor of Lilliput is representative of George I, the king on the throne when Gulliver's Travels was published. The pro-Whig George I persecuted the High Church Tories. When Gulliver details...

    Asked by laesperanzademarbeth on via web

    3 educator answers

  • Gulliver's Travels
    In Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, the narrative's main incidents can be found in the book's four voyages. In the first voyage, Gulliver is stranded on Lilliput, an island of small people...

    Asked by user7255586 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Gulliver's Travels
    The main problem the Lilliputians face while attempting to move Gulliver from his place on the beach into their city is simply lifting and placing him into the vehicle with which they plan to move...

    Asked by ranaritika45 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    The emperor of Lilliput is taller, by perhaps a centimeter or so, than anyone else in his court, and Gulliver says that the height difference is enough to impress a beholder. Likewise, he has...

    Asked by sandalsingh73 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver's conscience will not let him participate in the total destruction of Blefuscu, or, as he puts it, he cannot allow himself to "be an Instrument of bringing a free and brave People into...

    Asked by anupammishra74 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver leaves his childhood home in Nottinghamshire in order to acquire an education. He attends a school in Cambridge called Emanuel College from age fourteen to seventeen. After this, as the...

    Asked by ananyasingh19982002 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver tells us that it is his "Fortune" to travel after he has gone to study at Emanuel College in Cambridge (from age fourteen to seventeen) as well as after he has been apprenticed to Mr....

    Asked by user1080038 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    The Emperor of Lilliput arrives early in Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, and he proves to be instantly memorable, as Swift uses both the Emperor and his policies to illustrate the absurd...

    Asked by user7283243 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    For reasons unclear, Skyris Bolgolam (the High Admiral) becomes Gulliver's "mortal Enemy" almost as soon as Gulliver arrives in Lilliput. Bolgolam's hatred of Gulliver increases after Gulliver's...

    Asked by user3917470 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    The reason for the dispute between the Lilliputians and the Blefuscudians begins with the great debate over which side of the egg is the proper one to break. When the grandfather of the current...

    Asked by subhashmitarout on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    When Gulliver first opens his eyes in Lilliput, he does not really remark on his feelings. He notes that he is bound by a great many ligatures to the ground, and he cannot get up. He hears...

    Asked by allenthomaskochikizhakkethil on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    The king of Brobdingnag is a moral giant relative to Gulliver, certainly, and to the Europeans Gulliver describes to him. The king asks for a full account of Gulliver's home -- its government, its...

    Asked by user5105341 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver believed that it would be his fortune, at some point, to travel. In order to prepare himself for a life of travel, he continued his education for some time, procuring money enough to do...

    Asked by user487776 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver goes to Blefuscu to escape the Lilliputian emperor's growing displeasure, later to find out that he has been named a traitor to Lilliput for several reasons and that Lilliputian leadership...

    Asked by pgloshahi21 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Gulliver's Travels
    When Gulliver wakes up in Lilliput, he sees that it is "just Day-light," and he realizes that he is unable to move his body at all. At first, he can see nothing but the sky since he is unable to...

    Asked by user5719587 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver describes the dress of the people of Lilliput in quite flattering terms in part because he found much to admire about them and in part because they were so small that everything about them...

    Asked by user5146715 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    When Gulliver reaches the land of Laputa, he feels such disquietude and anxiety that it overwhelms his exhaustion and keeps him awake at night. He begins to feel despair, wondering how he will...

    Asked by pyaresimran68 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Gulliver's Travels
    When Gulliver frees his left arm, the Lilliputians ran out of his reach and then launched a volley of arrows into him. Of course, he is so big that the arrows do not cause him serious harm, but...

    Asked by adrijaduttaroy on via web

    1 educator answer

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