Grendel Questions and Answers

Grendel

John Gardner's Grendel is written from the monster's point of view, or more precisely, the work is presented as if the monster wrote it. First of all, then, readers are likely to identify with the...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2010 1:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

Definitions of anti-hero vary slightly from source to source, but a good working definition is that an anti-hero is a story's protagonist that doesn't adhere to the traditional characteristics of a...

Latest answer posted June 1, 2019 3:19 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Grendel

The most striking and immediately obvious difference between the two works is the point of view. Similar to Milton's Paradise Lost, which tells the story of creation from the point of view of Satan...

Latest answer posted January 2, 2020 9:27 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Grendel

John Gardner gives Grendel a voice in his novel Grendel, and the reader learns what it's like to be Grendel from the creature himself. From the start of the novel, Grendel describes feeling...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2018 5:40 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Grendel

In "Beowulf" there is no sympathy nor motivation for the monster's actions. Grendel is a flat (or static) character rather than a round one. He is simply an evil that the intrepid Beowulf must...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2007 8:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

The tone of John Gardner's Grendel, a novel written from the point of view of the title character who is a villainous outcast, is dark without being somber, funny without being light, and plaintive...

Latest answer posted September 14, 2018 9:22 am UTC

2 educator answers

Grendel

The answer to this question can be found in the final chapter of this book, Chapter Twelve, which details the long-awaited battle between Grendel and Beowulf and what happens as a result. One of...

Latest answer posted August 23, 2011 8:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

At the end of the anonymous Old English epic Beowulf, the eponymous hero kills a dragon that has been attacking his people but dies from his wounds. Wiglaf is a kinsman of Beowulf who helped...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2019 2:13 am UTC

2 educator answers

Grendel

John Gardner's novel Grendel begins in the twelfth year of Grendel's terrorizing of Hrothgar and Heorot, and perhaps the best phrase to describe his tone is defiant rage. Grendel is mad at...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2013 5:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

Grendel, a novel by John Gardner, gives us the classic story of the epic poem Beowulf from the monster Grendel's perspective. While Grendel is not written in poetic verse as Beowulf is, it still...

Latest answer posted December 18, 2017 7:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

Grendel is the 1971 novel by American writer John Gardner. It is a retelling of the famous epic poem Beowulf from the perspective of the antagonist, Grendel. This novel presents the titular...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2020 12:34 am UTC

4 educator answers

Grendel

It's not so much that Grendel is portrayed as the good guy and that the Danes are the bad guys. It's simply that by providing Grendel with a backstory in his retelling of the Beowulf legend,...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2018 1:19 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Grendel

Grendel loves language, specifically the poetic language of the shaper, which he says has the power to make him believe in the "lies" of the Hrothgar's greatness, even though he knows the truth....

Latest answer posted January 3, 2011 8:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

Concerning Grendel's attitude toward language in the novel, Grendel, remember that according to the world of this novel, according to the conventions used in the novel, the narrator, Grendel,...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2011 3:25 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

John Gardner, author of Grendel, manages to give excitement and suspense to internal awakenings, discoveries, and changes of consciousness by making Grendel the point-of-view character and by...

Latest answer posted October 20, 2015 2:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

John Gardner presents Grendel as a complicated, imperfect character who shows many of the characteristics of a hero. Rather than the simplistic, brutal monster of the traditional Beowulf epic,...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2020 3:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

Modern works like John Gardner's Grendel are difficult to categorize in terms of genre. Some works, like this are mixed and can be seen from different perspectives. In light of this, I would say...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2012 1:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

In John Gardner's Grendel, the Shaper has a profound impact on Grendel. The biggest reason is that, contrary to the original tale of Beowulf, Grendel has "language." So not only can we comprehend...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2012 4:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

In the Anglo-Saxon era, storytellers, sometimes called scops, were considered vital parts of society. The clannish Anglo-Saxons were a tight-knit, warlike people whose ancient religion did not...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2016 10:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

This early fictional monster, Beowulf’s challenge in Heorot, is a monster drawn not from Nature, but from imagination. It is, of course, strong, ferocious, a carnivore, but a water-dweller (he...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2013 12:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

John Gardner's Grendel is a novel which adapts one of the most famous heroic poems in the world, reimagining it through the eyes of the monster killed by the hero. To change the perspective is to...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2020 12:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

With regard to Gardner's Grendel, I struggle with the sense that Grendel gives "to 'his' people the kinds of 'boons' or benefits that an epic hero gives." I can't find who Grendel's people are...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2012 4:26 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

In studying satire in John Gardner's Grendel, consider first the definition of satire. In a literary piece, it is... ...the use of humor and wit with a critical attitude, irony, sarcasm, or...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2014 7:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

In John Gardner's Grendel, the concept of truth relates toperspective. In the original tale of Beowulf, the monster has—for no good reason—attacked and killed Hrothgar's men. Beowulf arrives to...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2011 3:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

We know his parentage, his hometown, and why he has come to rescue Hrothgar from Grendel. He has a sense of duty and honor as he has come to repay Hrothgar's kindness to Beowulf's father when he...

Latest answer posted June 4, 2008 5:33 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

In Gardner's Grendel, Grendel knows, or at least strongly suspects, that Hrothgar's children will never rule his kingdom. He knows that Hrothulf will kill Hrothgar's children as soon as Hrothgar...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2010 1:55 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Grendel

On the one hand, Grendel points out the ways in which he is definitely dissimilar from the ram. His first point of difference is the way thet he says his brains are definitely not, "squeezed shut,...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2011 7:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

Grendel is a monster. No, really, he is. He's also the narrator of the novel bearing his name, which tells the Beowulf story from his perspective. The story is written in first-person prose, which...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2017 5:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

In John Gardner's Grendel, in chapter seven, after Grendel has been exposed to the Shaper, Grendel, the narrator, writes: Pity poor Hrothgar, Grendel's foe! Pity poor Grendel, O,O,O! That's...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2012 3:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

Grendel's encounter with the goat in Chapter 10 follows a scene in which he was processing the life-and-death philosophies that the Ork shared with him. These ideas have caused some misgivings...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2018 5:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

Grendel by John Gardner, is a retelling of the Anglo-Saxon poem, Beowulf in which Grendel is one of three main antagonists.The book, Grendel, is told from the point of view of this antagonist....

Latest answer posted January 9, 2008 10:37 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Grendel

Remember that an "anedote" is a short story (sometimes funny) and often biographical.In Garner's version of the classic epic, an anedote would be learning how Grendel came to be...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2007 7:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

When the narrator of John Gardner's, Grendel, the monster himself, relates in chapter nine what he sees and has seen of priests praying and worshipping he gives only two terms to refer to the gods:...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2009 9:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

This story is based on the poem Beowulf and in Beowulf Grendel is horrid. He is simply a monstrous murderous beast so when Grendel rips his arm off at the end essentially killing Grendel, we the...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2008 12:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

Part of Grendel's problem comes from his lineage--his ancestor is Cain, the world's first murderer. As a result (especially according to Anglo-Saxon thinking), he is cursed forever since killing...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2007 11:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

"Firelight flickering on the walls," would certainly be alliteration as opposed to a kenning. You can check the enotes Guide to Literary Terms in the Literature Guides section to get these...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2015 9:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

Many similarities exist between the characters of Achilles and Grendel. One could begin by arguing that the two are, in effect, mirror images: Achilles is a man made superhuman by supernatural...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2017 8:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

The answer to this question can be found in Chapter Five, which is when the Grendel first meets the dragon in the pages of this excellent novel. According to the dragon, what distinguishes humans...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2011 7:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

Throughout John Gardner’s novelization, we see numerous differences between Grendel’s interpretation of events and the more widely known version presented in the epic poem Beowulf. As Grendel tells...

Latest answer posted November 7, 2019 3:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Grendel

As a self-identified monster, Grendel remains outside the realm of mortals, but constantly observes them. His ideas of life do not match those of the humans, allowing him a view separate from the...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2009 9:16 am UTC

1 educator answer