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  • The Great Gatsby
    Social class plays an important role in shaping men in the novel. If we start with George Wilson, the most consistently lower class male character in novel (I am leaving out the servants), he has...

    Asked by veronicakenefick on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Fitzgerald portrays the vain pursuit of the American Dream by depicting the corruption of Gatsby's soul and Nick Carraway's jaded perception of the upper class. Jay Gatsby compromises his morals,...

    Asked by tdjjkirk on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    One of the most recognizable, prominent symbols throughout the novel is the green light situated at the end of Daisy's dock, which is across from Gatsby's home. Jay Gatsby ritually stands at the...

    Asked by tncooper03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    The American Dream, as F. Scott Fitzgerald envisions it in his novel, is probably best expressed on the last page. Nick Carraway, the novel's narrator and moral conscience, is leaving his home on...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    This is an important quote. Gatsby says this to Nick as he is reuniting with Daisy for the first time in five years. Gatsby's whole life since they parted has revolved around seeing her again and...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    The Valley of the Ashes is a desolate place. The giant, faded eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg on an old billboard hover over the landscape. It is described as a place halfway between New York City...

    Asked by tncooper03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    We're never told exactly why Daisy and Tom stay together. We know from early on in the novel that Tom is having an affair with another woman. We know that Daisy knows about the affair, though not...

    Asked by tncooper03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    There are a number of reasons why Daisy won't divorce Tom and marry Gatsby. For one thing, she actually takes her marriage vows seriously and so never really contemplates divorce, no matter how...

    Asked by tncooper03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    One could say Daisy Buchanan is the original "Material Girl," a woman that Gatsby describes as having a voice that "sounds like money." She is so impressed with Gatsby's custom-made English shirts...

    Asked by tncooper03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    The quotation tells us an awful lot about Daisy's character. Her voice is "full of money" in the sense that she shares the accent and vocal mannerisms of the old money elite. Every time she opens...

    Asked by tncooper03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Like the novel itself, Jay Gatsby's greatness encompasses several layers. Perhaps the best way to discuss Gatsby’s greatness is to look at the novel’s title. The term “the great” could...

    Asked by tncooper03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Gatsby is trying to recapture the moment in time five years past when he and Daisy first fell in love. As Jordan tells the story to Nick, who tells it to us, Daisy and Jay met 1917, during World...

    Asked by tncooper03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Yes, the main characters in the novel seem like real people. They are both sympathetic and flawed, as real people are. Nobody is a cardboard cut-out hero or villain, not even Tom Buchanan. Nick is...

    Asked by tncooper03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    In thinking about what the characters in The Great Gatsby might "represent," it is important to remember that they are not mere symbols without any kind of human agency. That said, several...

    Asked by tncooper03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    This quote from chapter 3 is a great example of Fitzgerald's poetic style. The quote is actually punctuated like this, and the comma after the word "before" makes all the difference: A wafer of a...

    Asked by dakelu0928 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Listing all of the quotes involving alcohol in this novel is going to be tough. The word "alcohol" is used once in the book. He and this Wolfshiem bought up a lot of side−street drug−stores...

    Asked by awesomejia on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    When Nick runs into Tom in late October after Gatsby's death, he asks Tom what Tom told Wilson about Myrtle's death. Tom says he told Wilson the "truth"--that Gatsby had run Myrtle over and kept on...

    Asked by avantikasolanki on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    The pursuit of individual happiness becomes counterproductive when it strays too far from reality. For example, Gatsby's pursuit of happiness lies in his conviction that he can turn back time and...

    Asked by rjcamp6 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    The Great Gatsby opens and closes with Nick reflecting on his time in New York City and frames one of the novel's primary themes, which is the illusion of dreams. The novel opens with Nick...

    Asked by acidfairy on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    In chapter 9, Nick answers a phone call for Gatsby that comes in from Chicago from a man named Slagle. The caller does not realize at first that he is talking to someone other than Gatsby, and he...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    By killing off Jay Gatsby, Fitzgerald makes an important point about the American Dream—specifically, that a dream cannot survive in the harsh world of the 1920s. Remember that the novel is...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Yes. In a way, Jay Gatsby is not aware of the dangers of becoming corrupted by the pursuit of attaining the American Dream. As a young, naive man, Gatsby is driven to become wealthy and enter the...

    Asked by schand9 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    The quote “rich girls don’t marry poor boys” does not appear in the novel version of The Great Gatsby. This quote appears in at least one of the film versions and comes from a real-life event...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    George Wilson is the perfect symbol for the downside of the American Dream. He runs a fairly unsuccessful garage in the Valley of Ashes, a place whose residents seem to be unable to get on in life,...

    Asked by bamdjandlighting on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    This quote is spoken by Nick Carraway, and he seems to be contrasting his own relationship with Jordan to Tom's and Gatsby's relationships with and romantic notions of Daisy Buchanan. The main idea...

    Asked by amoralez69 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    I would describe Nick Carraway as a pessimist, especially by the time he has left New York and, ostensibly, written this narrative. He admits, early in the first chapter, that [tolerance] has a...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    The Valley of Ashes provides a counterpoint to the lavishness of East Egg and West Egg. The Valley of Ashes represents extreme poverty and hopelessness. Those who inhabit the valley are condemned...

    Asked by user2653585 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    The American Dream is the idea that any citizen can attain wealth and advance their social status through good fortune, hard work, and dedication. Jay Gatsby is the ironic epitome of the American...

    Asked by zeinahassan99 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    I can understand why one could argue the word is incorrect, but I would say that the use is correct. The "accidental" burden is Gatsby himself. Admittedly, Gatsby is not on the pool mattress, or...

    Asked by qttttq95 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Great Gatsby
    To answer this question, take a look at chapter 4. During their drive to New York, Gatsby says some weird things and acts in a strange way. First, without any prompting, Gatsby says he wants to...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    To write a literary analysis paper about the character Jay Gatsby, you could go in several directions. First, you could ask what Fitzgerald, through Nick, is trying to say about Gatsby. What does...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    By introducing Myrtle directly after the valley of ashes, Fitzgerald gives the reader a deeper insight into her character. Specifically, he reveals to us that Myrtle is using Tom to live her own...

    Asked by evirnika on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Foreshadowing is a literary technique whereby the author drops subtle hints of what is going to happen later in the story. There are many examples of this in The Great Gatsby, but here are just a...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    It would be fair to say that Nick does not enjoy his time at Tom's apartment in New York. He doesn't explicitly say so, but from his description of what happens, it's a fair assumption that he...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Gatsby's riotous party descends into drunken chaos and disorder. Nick is one of the few people who's actually been invited, but almost everyone else just gate-crashes. As Gatsby's such a generous...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Mr. Wilson owns a garage in the valley of ashes. He sells gas and repairs cars, but he also buys and sells cars, as we learn early on in the novel. Tom's business with him throughout the novel is...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Tom Buchanan is a Chicago native who has inherited immense wealth. He had been a notable football player at Yale and in his early thirties, is active on the polo circuit and a resident of East Egg....

    Asked by klinhlink01 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    In my opinion, Jay Gatsby in F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel The Great Gatsby did not accomplish his dreams. Gatsby's dream was to be married to Daisy and, more expansively, to be worthy of Daisy's...

    Asked by crcmpink on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Daisy Buchanan, Jordan Baker, and Myrtle Wilson all represent a shift in the traditional woman and changing gender roles. F. Scott Fitzgerald first makes this change apparent by giving the women in...

    Asked by martaramosx on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Great Gatsby
    In the first chapter of The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald shapes the reader's expectations of Gatsby in a number of ways. Firstly, in the exposition, Fitzgerald portrays Gatsby as a man who is very...

    Asked by schand9 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    In The Great Gatsby, characters that come from old money are almost invincible. Not only do they have material wealth to buy the things that they want, but they exist within a social status that...

    Asked by picklerick on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Throughout the novel The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald illustrates the vain pursuit of the American Dream. For the characters in the novel, achieving the American Dream means achieving financial...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    The American Dream is the idea that an individual from humble beginnings can earn financial freedom and advance their social class through hard work and dedication. Jay Gatsby earns the typical...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Throughout the novel The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald examines the early to mid-1920s, which was a time of economic prosperity in America following World War I. America was becoming more urbanized as...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    Fitzgerald, author of The Great Gatsby, believed that the American Dream was not really feasible. Gatsby, the protagonist of the novel, has defined the American Dream not only as merely gaining...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald explores a number of themes. Firstly, there is a strong focus on the theme of wealth. This is shown clearly through the settings of East and West Egg, areas in which...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    The American Dream is the belief that anyone, regardless of race, wealth, or status can ascend the social ladder through hard work and dedication and reach financial success. Throughout the novel...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Great Gatsby
    This is a fairly complex assignment. In your first paragraph, you should set out a discussion of what your paper will be addressing. Perhaps the best issue to talk about is the decline in social...

    Asked by user7443931 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    In The Great Gatsby, the characters have different ways of expressing and living out their dream lives. Gatsby, for example, is chiefly concerned with winning back Daisy, his lost love. He believes...

    Asked by user8711861 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Great Gatsby
    In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald illustrates the failure of the American Dream in two ways. First of all, he does this through the settings he creates. Think, for example, about the differences...

    Asked by on via web

    1 educator answer

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