The Grapes of Wrath Questions and Answers

The Grapes of Wrath

The quotation from John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath appears just after a description of the waste and destruction of food when people are starving. Carloads of oranges have been dumped, but...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2021, 3:13 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

The turtle in chapter 3 of The Grapes of Wrath is significant because it represents the tenacity and persistence of the Joad family and other migrants in confronting and surmounting obstacles...

Latest answer posted April 23, 2020, 3:46 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

One of the main lessons that we see taught throughout the book is that generosity can come in all forms, and that even in your own darkest hour, generosity can be the most powerful thing you can...

Latest answer posted December 18, 2015, 8:18 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Of the inner, or intercalary chapters, of his classic of American literature, John Steinbeck wrote, With the rhythms and symbols of poetry one can get into a reader—open him up and while he is...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2013, 4:07 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

The character Rose of Sharon has the most obvious symbolism in The Grapes of Wrath. The name of Tom Joad's sister Rose of Sharon is a reference to the Song of Song in the Hebrew Bible, which...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2019, 7:08 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath is full of literary devices. Before we get to some of them, let's make sure we know what a literary device is. Think about what a device is. A phone could be a...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2020, 11:59 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

In Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath, the handbills are essentially flyers that encouraged poor folks looking for a better quality of life to travel to California to pick produce. In the novel, the...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2019, 1:24 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Throughout The Grapes of Wrath, Steinbeck illustrates the importance of solidarity among citizens in contrast to competition, which is represented by the interests of big banks and wealthy...

Latest answer posted November 9, 2017, 1:52 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

In this famous excerpt from The Grapes of Wrath, we're presented with the unforgettable metaphor of banks and land-holding companies as monsters. They're not literally monsters, of course, insofar...

Latest answer posted June 14, 2020, 7:50 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

The title was suggested by Steinbeck's first wife after hearing the song, The Battle Hymn of the Republic. "Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord/He is trampling out the...

Latest answer posted March 2, 2008, 9:43 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Chapter 20 contains the scene where Jim Casy is taken to jail. The Joads and Casy are at the first squatter's camp they stay in when they finally arrive in California. At this camp, some men come...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2008, 9:01 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

The truck driver in Chapter 2 represents the way in which the poor help the poor. Tom Joad has been walking home when he comes upon the truck at a roadside diner. A sticker on the windshield reads...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2019, 1:27 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck, is a novel which follows the Joad family as they, along with so many others suffering the effects of the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, are forced to...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2013, 2:13 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Most of the narration is written in third person, but some chapters have anonymous characters narrate the Joads' journey to give an outside, objective point of view. On page 206 (Chapter 14) the...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2010, 1:31 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

I'm with #4 on the hope idea. Something is bad, but someone offers to help. A job is lost, but someone helps provide. Some are up to no good, but everyone rallies around to get rid of them. He...

Latest answer posted July 27, 2010, 7:25 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

The beginning of chapter nine is an extended metaphor about the pain of the farmers selling off their belongings to the junk man at horrendously low prices. It is mostly farming implements, an...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2020, 2:00 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Casy's death represents several elements in the narrative. The first is that it shows the lengths that the "owners and their minions" will go to silence the truth from being spoken. Casy's death...

Latest answer posted July 30, 2011, 12:44 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

In Chapter 16 of The Grapes of Wrath, the Wilson's car breaks down again, and Tom suggests that he and Casy stay behind to fix it (it needs a bearing, which they will have to wait to buy on...

Latest answer posted May 8, 2010, 8:23 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Social realism is defined as a medium that artists, authors, filmmakers, and photographers portray and depict the everyday lives of poor, working-class individuals. John Steinbeck's use of social...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2018, 8:52 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

This quote comes from a tenant farmer speaking to a man driving a bulldozing tractor through the countryside, destroying the homes of poor farmers who work the land. The man driving the tractor...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2018, 7:22 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

This excerpt employs a metaphor to describe the bank. A metaphor describes something by comparing it to something different that has similar characteristics. In this case, the bank is compared to a...

Latest answer posted June 12, 2020, 7:21 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Chapter 14 of The Grapes of Wrath expresses in almost Biblical tones the overarching theme of this great novel: Men when unified have strength and dignity, for there is a spiritual neccessity to...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2011, 12:06 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

As you look for significant quotations from The Grapes of Wrath, think about the book's important themes and look for moments when the language of the novel expresses some aspect of those themes....

Latest answer posted November 8, 2010, 6:46 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Route 66 is an actual road, the number was given to it by the government so Steinbeck had no symbolic meaning for it in the book. Route 66 has an interesting and colorful history because it was...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2009, 10:58 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

John Steinbeck’s novel traces the struggles of the extended Joad family from Oklahoma on their way to California in the 1930s. The Joads lost their land to the Dust Bowl, and, like many other...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2020, 11:22 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Wheatpatch Camp, called Weedpatch Camp in the book, is much nicer than the other camps the Joads have seen. It is a government camp, and it is well run; Weedpatch is a place where Ma Joad knows...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2009, 1:17 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

One good example of vivid imagery in The Grapes of Wrath is found on the first page of Chapter 17, and again on the last page of the chapter. In the daylight [the migrant people] scuttled like...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2010, 7:24 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Steinbeck spends a good deal of time describing the turtle crossing the road in chapter three. The turtle symbolizes the Joads and all the other sharecroppers displaced by the Dust Bowl who have to...

Latest answer posted November 17, 2018, 2:12 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

In creating the setting of a once rich, fertile earth now deprived of life-giving nourishment, John Steinbeck introduces the first of the harships of the Joads, Oklahoma farmers who become the...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2011, 11:28 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

These chapters depict figure without names, for the most part, helping to demonstrate the idea that what is happening to the Joad family is happening to many other Americans. The plight of the...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2015, 8:09 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

In Steinbeck's wonderful novel The Grapes of Wrath, the author frequently uses animals as symbols for the state of well-being of the family members; there are many examples of this throughout the...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2018, 7:52 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

In Chapter Sixteen of The Grapes of Wrath, there are several literary devices at work: Figurative language Steinbeck describes the Joad and Wilson families as in flight across the Panhandle, a...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2012, 5:46 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

The condition of nature in the opening chapter is reflective of a progression where it is increasingly difficult to find mercy from the harsh elements. The land reflects this state of war- like...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2013, 1:09 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

In The Grapes of Wrath, we see prejudice against the migrant workers who travel to California for a better life, like the Joad family. They are seen as outsiders and paid little for their work...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2019, 6:43 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

With syntax meaning the systematic, grammatical arrangement of words in a sentence, Chapter 21 of The Grapes of Wrath. an intercalary chapter, demonstrates the biblical refrain that Steinbeck has...

Latest answer posted August 2, 2011, 11:53 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

This is a great question! In my opinion, chapters 1, 29, and 9 are the most significant. Chapter 1 presents the setting: at first,the reader sees the rain leaving the landscape, the weeds and...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2007, 10:54 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

As Tom Joad and Casy the preacher make their way to Uncle John's place, they pass some dogs along the way. There's a female dog in season and a group of male dogs hanging around her. This adds a...

Latest answer posted February 2, 2018, 2:19 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

In chapter 9, one of the interchapters, the narration asks: " How can we live without our lives? How will we know it's us without our past? No. Leave it. Burn it." Then in the next...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2008, 10:26 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Much like the newsreel style of John Dos Passos in U.S.A. Trilogy, Steinbeck's intercalary Chapter 7 portrays rhetorically the cold exploitation of the used car salesmen who sell vehicles to the...

Latest answer posted January 28, 2011, 7:37 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

The theme of the turtle vignette is endurance. The turtle serves as an allegory of the experience of the Joads and others like them. It is moving along the same road as the rest of the displaced...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2011, 1:41 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

The above quote, taken from John Steinbeck's novel The Grapes of Wrath, uses two different kinds of figures of speech. A phrase at the end of the quotation, "the wheel screamed" is an example of...

Latest answer posted June 12, 2020, 6:37 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

The previous post was well directed. I would say that Steinbeck’s work is relevant to the modern setting because it articulates the condition of being poor. In a nation such as America, poverty...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2010, 5:18 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

His family is gone. His home is destroyed. His friends are nowhere to be found. Even though there is nothing tangible to keep Tom Joad in his old neighborhood, he has one primary reason for his...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018, 6:23 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Tom Joad, imprisoned for four years after being charged with manslaughter, learned a lot about life while he was locked up. These lessons impact his character and his way of looking at the world,...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2018, 11:54 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Symbolic of capitalism, the banks represent both a cold force that drives families into poverty as well as the cruel self-interest of the businessmen who reclaim property from those who have given...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2011, 6:50 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Those mountain men walked through town, 5000 strong, each armed with a rifle and challenged the town's people to suppress them. Of course, the town's people left them alone. In a nutshell, Black...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2008, 4:47 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

For Connie and Rose, California is a kind of Shangri-La, a place where the streets are paved with gold, the sun never stops shining, and the air is sweet and clear. Rose is much too young and naive...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2019, 5:38 am (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

I assume you are asking for examples of hard work shown in the novel. There are many of those. Steinbeck wanted to show the readers how hard working the migrants were. The hardships of the trip...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2008, 8:53 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

Both the Joads and the turtle embark on a dangerous journey. The Joads take as many belongings as they can with them as a defense against the unknown, just as the turtle carries its home on its...

Latest answer posted March 17, 2019, 7:42 pm (UTC)

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The Grapes of Wrath

We can learn that, in some situations, the working class has to organize to overcome the power of the moneyed class that controls business. In The Grapes of Wrath the workers do not make any...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2012, 12:15 am (UTC)

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