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  • The Giver
    Jonas is allowed to watch the release of a child because he is the Receiver. In the society in which Jonas lives, pain and suffering have been eliminated. Because people are not permitted to be in...

    Asked by kesang123 on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The page numbers that the rules are located on are going to vary depending upon the copy/edition of the book which you own. Thus, to make this answer as consistent as possible, I will provide an...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    Jonas's spiritual reassessment at the end of the book The Giver by Lois Lowry is brought about by the realization that his adopted brother, Gabriel, is about to be "released" (that is, killed)....

    Asked by booklover13312 on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    Jonas, the protagonist of The Giver, feels trapped in his community because the community does not allow him to be close to people and imposes unfair and brutal laws (such as the impending release,...

    Asked by user9748777 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    I would like to argue that "society is closely monitored" in The Giver more than just "somewhat" and that Jonas's society does have "highly developed technology." The citizens in The Giver are...

    Asked by user9748777 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Giver
    Both the societies of The Giver and that of "The Pedestrian" exert great control over their citizens. 1.Totalitarian government In the world of The Giver, everything is controlled—the weather,...

    Asked by user9748777 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The answer to this question could go two ways, so I'll attempt to answer both. In general, the reasons behind each rule are the same. Rules are a very important part of the society in The Giver. To...

    Asked by user9748777 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The society that exists in Lois Lowry's The Giver does its best to keep everything equal for everyone. For example, everyone receives the same types of dwellings, family units, and rules to follow...

    Asked by sage4398 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    Selflessness is when someone places another's needs above his or her own. In Lowry's The Giver, children are required to volunteer their time in the services of others. Jonas's friend Fiona...

    Asked by camnoel1029 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    When the Giver and Jonas come up with the plan to save the community from Sameness, they feel the only way to do it is for Jonas to go away alone and for the Giver to stay behind to help the...

    Asked by novenoaa9 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    Lois Lowry's novel, The Giver, takes place in a constructed world in which emotion, choice, and memory have been removed from the human community. Upon first introduction, this world seems perfect....

    Asked by kamasinger2004 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Literature
    The society has many structural guidelines because it is an attempt to build a utopia - that is, a perfect society - by controlling all natural human tendencies. The result is a soulless,...

    Asked by user9647093 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    In Lois Lowry's The Giver, the chief elder with the beard is the Receiver. When he gives memories to Jonas, he becomes the Giver. He is the one who will train Jonas to be the next Receiver of...

    Asked by pechsyho on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    In the story, Lily giggles when she hears the word "hippo." To Lily, the word is a strange one, and this is why she reacts the way she does. In the story, each newchild is provided with what is...

    Asked by gunnarwegscheider on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    At the end of The Giver, it is assumed that Jonas and little Gabriel reach safety in Elseware. When Jonas first left his community, search planes had frequently flown overhead. Jonas had to hide...

    Asked by ewmott68 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    In The Giver, Lily experiences little development as a character. Throughout the text she is straightfoward, talkative, and innocent. Because she is so direct, her dialogue is often expository to...

    Asked by user6120306 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    In Lois Lowry's The Giver, children receive a new responsibility each year during the ceremony days. At the beginning of the story, Jonas's sister turns eight, but she is mostly excited for the...

    Asked by jaderherbert on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The characters’ choices in The Giver should seem unbelievable and horrific to its audience. For example, Jonas’s father, a seemingly “good” man, does not show any guilt after euthanizing...

    Asked by caitlinwarsh3 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The Chief Elder describes Jonas's assignment as a selection, unique from all the other assignments given that day. He has been selected to be the next Receiver of Memory. This is a very rare...

    Asked by marylynsun on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    At the end of chapter 9 of Lois Lowry's The Giver, Jonas reads the rules and instructions for his new assignment as the Receiver in training. The last rule says that he is allowed to lie. This rule...

    Asked by divagirl6598 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    In The Giver, people who are depressed apply for release, which means death. For example, the Receiver of Memories before Jonas, a girl named Rosemary, was given pain, loneliness, and sadness by...

    Asked by mariagrace on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The speaker’s job in Jonas’s community is a combination of enforcement and announcements. For example, when the jet flies overhead, the speaker tells everyone to drop their bicycles and go...

    Asked by jermeisafisher13 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    As The Giver (Lowry) begins, Jonas is eleven years old. We know this because he is looking forward to the Ceremony of Twelve. This ceremony takes place annually, as does the ceremony for all the...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    Throughout the majority of the novel, Jonas did not fully understand the meaning of the term "release." In Chapter 19, the Giver makes Jonas watch footage of an infant twin being released by Jonas'...

    Asked by bentonknalige on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Giver
    The community that Jonas lives in with his family has many rules. The purpose of these rules is to maintain order and particular standards. The people in the community are controlled by the many...

    Asked by user9388549 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    In the novel, there appear to be several advantages to release. However, remember that these so-called advantages can only be viewed through the lens of the novel's dystopian world. In reality,...

    Asked by fcbarcelona1million on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The major conflict of Lois Lowry's The Giver has to do with Jonas figuring out who or what is his antagonist. At first, it seems as though the ones who run the government are to blame for limiting...

    Asked by sbgymnast13 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The community in Lowry's The Giver solves the homelessness problem through population control. For instance, one of the community's policies is to allow only a specific number of babies to be born...

    Asked by ajanosko on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    This is a good question to ask. It seems hard to believe that people would simply go along with all the rules, with people being put to death, with the complete lack of choice. However, there are...

    Asked by manoelapedroza07 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    In Lowry's The Giver, death is referred to as "release" because the leaders of the community, the Elders, do not want the people of the community to realize that their members are being killed....

    Asked by beautiqveen on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Literature
    In The Giver (Lowry), it is often just implicit that the Elders have all the power, but there are some quotes that do make it explicit. I'll provide a few. In the scene in Chapter 6 in which Jonas...

    Asked by neamtua on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    Language "precision," as it is called, is another tool used by the society of The Giver to control the community and keep them content and safe by desensitizing them. In his essay "Politics and the...

    Asked by bleusby on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Literature
    There really are not any examples where the society in The Giver violates the Third Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. The society in the book violates many of the other...

    Asked by user8166619 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The Ceremony of Twelve takes place each year in December; at this time the Elders select the position that each Twelve will hold in the community. Since this is the final ceremony, it represents a...

    Asked by omarsyed6627 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    I would argue the inability to feel emotions makes someone not fully human, and Lois Lowry's The Giver shows the high cost of suppressing emotion. Without emotions, we are not really that different...

    Asked by coolcatz8080 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The Ceremony of Loss is conducted when a person dies by accident. This is different from release, which the people of Jonas’s community do not actually understand to be death. The Ceremony of...

    Asked by daisylopes34 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    There are significant differences in the conditions of the Annex room from what exists in other dwellings in the society. The Giver dwells there alone, the door locks, the speaker has an...

    Asked by judy5777 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    In Lois Lowry's The Giver, memories are "forever" in the sense that they must be held by at least one person. They will not cease to exist. Released by one person, they inevitably will attach...

    Asked by user4041926 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    Jonas is more mature and more thoughtful by the middle of the book because he has been through some of his training as Receiver of Memory. Through the memories, he has learned enough about his...

    Asked by daniellesanchez9808 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The Receiver is the most honored person in the community because it is a unique position only one person can hold at a time. This position requires a person who has some very unique traits. When...

    Asked by amritanshroxs on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    Dream-telling begins with Threes. Dream-telling is a morning ritual used by Jonas’s community. Like the feeling-telling in the evening, dream-telling is designed to identify, label, and dismiss...

    Asked by jbauto77 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Giver
    In The Giver (Lowry), the Elders use euphemisms to deal with the aspects of life that they seek to control. Death becomes "release," for instance, and sexual desire becomes "stirrings." The Elders...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    Jonas changes from an obedient and immature child to an independent, strong-willed and sensitive young man. When the book begins, Jonas doesn’t question his society. He is the same as everyone...

    Asked by commondoodle on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    Lois Lowry first had the idea to create the world of The Giver when her father began suffering from memory loss in his old age. She saw the suffering and emotional pain he went through when she...

    Asked by be28969 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    It was considered impolite to call attention to individual differences of those within the community. Sameness was the ideal within the community. Anything else was a negative thing, and it "was...

    Asked by reptoxic on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    It is important that Jonas sees the apple change because it is his first indication that he is different and his community is not what it seems. When Jonas is growing up, he believes what everyone...

    Asked by cxaachklr on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The rule against children under nine riding bicycles was useless because everyone broke it. At the age of nine, everyone gets a bicycle in Jonas’s community. It is one of the rites of passages...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The rules of the dystopian society of The Giver are meant to keep life controlled and predictable so that life will be made easier and safer. Here are two rules that are positive in nature. These...

    Asked by user4298944 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    Jonas leaves his community when he finds out that Gabriel is going to be released. When Jonas finds out what release really means, he is shocked. He has no idea, like everyone else in his...

    Asked by chanchinkan2015 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Giver
    The citizens of Jonas’s society do not have any personal freedoms. All of the decisions are made for them. Therefore, their society has nothing similar to the Bill of Rights. There are only...

    Asked by scrow100551 on via web

    1 educator answer

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