General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

by Geoffrey Chaucer
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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

  Discuss the prologue to The Canterbury Tales as a Mirror to fourteenth century English society.  

The Prologue is a mirror to fourteenth century English society because in it Chaucer introduces us to various types of people who would have been familiar in that culture. There is an emphasis on...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2018 11:33 am UTC

2 educator answers

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In The Canterbury Tales, why does the narrator join the pilgrims?

In the General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, the narrator starts by telling the reader that pilgrims often go on trips to the martyr's shrine in April. The martyr he is referring to is Thomas...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2016 1:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

How does Chaucer portray the Parson in The Canterbury Tales?

Contrary to many of the other characters, Geoffrey Chaucer's Parson (from The Canterbury Tales) proves to be a truly good man. Having taken a vow of poverty, the Parson lives a very poor life (in...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2013 11:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What are the main characteristics of the friar in The Canterbury Tales?

Like the Prioress and the Monk before him, the Friar is another representative of the religious establishment who fails to any of the expected virtues. Among other things, He hadde madd full many...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2013 3:11 pm UTC

2 educator answers

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

How does Chaucer describe the prioress and the monk?

The Prioress and the Monk are both members of the First Estate, a level of society into which corruption found its way. With such wrongdoing, the clergy is easily the target of Geoffrey Chaucer's...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2017 10:06 pm UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In the Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, by Chaucer, the Prioress wears a brooch with an "A" on it. What is the...

Chaucer's masterpiece entitled The Canterbury Tales, though unfinished, provides a valuable insight into the lives of those living in medieval England. The structural framework of the piece (the...

Latest answer posted December 19, 2012 8:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Comment on Chaucer's use of irony in the Prologue to the Canterbury Tales?

In satire, there is the use of irony, humor, and exaggeration to criticize the foibles and vices of people. Chaucer cleverly satirizes many of the pilgrims as he points to their hypocrisy. In the...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2015 10:05 am UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Which member of the emerging middle class does Chaucer portray in the most favorable light? In what way does his...

Out of the middle-class characters described, the Wife of Bath gets the most favorable description. Chaucer describes her as "good" and "worthy," even if she has a temper. Compared to the other...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2019 1:00 pm UTC

2 educator answers

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Write a note on the first eighteen lines of Chaucer's prologue to The Canterbury Tales.

The first eighteen lines of the General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales describe the setting and the basic blot of the poem’s frame story: in the springtime, as nature reawakens, people of England...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2019 3:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What is the theme and purpose of General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer?

Without the "General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales," none of the other stories which comprise Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales would make as much sense or, frankly, have as much purpose....

Latest answer posted December 12, 2013 9:46 pm UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Chaucer gives us a microcosm of English society in the Prologue of The Canterbury Tales. Explain.

Chaucer's General Prologue does several things: it creates both a natural and human setting for the work; gives a description, one by one, of people, or types, who represent the England of his...

Latest answer posted January 11, 2020 5:59 pm UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What are three traits of the Squire in The Canterbury Tales?

The Squire is young, fashionable, and (perhaps most importantly) amorous. The reader knows that the Squire is young because he is described immediately after the famous Knight who "had his son...

Latest answer posted October 9, 2009 2:10 am UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Why are the people gathered at the inn in Geoffrey Chaucer's General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales?

The cast of characters found in Geoffrey Chaucer's General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales are not all connected except by their goal and their destination. Each of the twenty-nine characters who...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2013 5:00 am UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Discuss Chaucer as a satirist with refrence to the "General Prologue" to The Canterbury Tales.

The overall tone of "The General Prologue" is gently satirical, with Chaucer poking fun at the representatives of each stratum of medieval society. As part of his satirical strategy, Chaucer makes...

Latest answer posted May 21, 2018 7:05 am UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

How does the Chaucer's attitude toward the Monk differ, if at all, from his attitude toward the Friar?

First, it is not always possible to infer the author's attitude from the persona of the poetic speaker, or narrator. In this case, however, it is fairly well agreed that the ironic and observant...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2011 3:31 am UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What are three of the satires in the General Prologue?

There have been attempts to show that most of the character sketches in the General Prologue of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales are satirical to some degree. For instance, although the Knight, who is...

Latest answer posted September 12, 2020 11:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

I really don't understand iambic pentameter. I need to be able to scan 2 lines from the prologue in iambic pentameter...

The Enotes page on iambic pentameter (to which I have provided a link below) does a great job of providing simple examples of scansion of iambic pentameter. The first thing to understand about...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2010 7:17 pm UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What vision of England does the group of pilgrims in the Prologue suggest?

Poet Laureate John Dryden sees a defining aspect of the Prologue to The Canterbury Tales in how it contains “the various manners and humoursof the whole English nation in [Chaucer’s] age.” It is...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2014 2:03 am UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Critically discuss Chaucers presentation of religious in the general prologue? answer

In the General Prologue of The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer is seemingly very critical of most of the pilgrims who are associated with the Catholic Church. One can very clearly see this criticism...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2010 5:37 am UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Who is a Prioress? Explain with reference to The Canterbury Tales.

The monastic tradition thrived within the medieval Church and was very much alive and kicking when Chaucer wrote The Canterbury Tales in the late 14th-century. This meant that the role of prioress...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2018 11:48 am UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Geoffrey Chaucer was both a Medievalist and a Modern. Illustrate from the "General Prologue" of The Canterbury Tales.

Geoffrey Chaucer, as the so-called “father of English poetry,” lived and wrote with one foot in the Middle Ages (Medieval) and the other in the period just preceding the Renaissance. We can call...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2016 3:59 pm UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Was Chaucer in favor of the church or opposed to it?  

After we read "the General Prologue" to The Canterbury Tales, we might think that Geoffrey Chaucer does not have a favorable opinion of the church as an institution. We should, though, keep in mind...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2020 2:53 pm UTC

2 educator answers

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What weapons does the Yeoman carry in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales?

The Yeoman, who accompanies the Knight as his only servant on the pilgrimage, carries several weapons, typical of his class and duties: A sheaf of arrows, with peacock feathers, bright and sharp ....

Latest answer posted October 24, 2013 7:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What are the strengths and weaknesses of Chaucer's "The General Prologue" in The Canterbury Tales? This a general...

In my critique of "The General Prologue," all I can see are the many positives. Chaucer changed the course of the English language when he wrote The Canterbury Tales: he used Middle English which...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2011 1:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

I need to write a detailed essay on Chaucer's use of humour and irony in "The Prologue" to The Canterburty Tales.

Reading through the account of the pilgrims, who they all are and some of the interactions between them reveals the customary humour and wit of Chaucer, that is clearly revealed in the way that he...

Latest answer posted February 2, 2013 6:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In The General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, what does Chaucer think of the Friar?

In The General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, one of several amazing things about this piece of literature is that Chaucer includes himself as one of the members of the pilgrimage. He is simply...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2015 7:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In Geoffrey Chaucer's Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, with what kind of pin is the monk's hood fastened?

In the General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer describes each of the characters who will be going on a pilgrimage, and among them is a monk. A monk is one who has determined to...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2013 10:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What are the features of characterization in the "General Prologue" of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales?

The other answer to this question does a really good job of providing a wide range of all the many ways that Chaucer characterizes his protagonists. I'd like to add one more feature of...

Latest answer posted June 12, 2018 4:46 pm UTC

2 educator answers

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Geoffrey Chaucer is considered the father of English poetry because he never passes judgements on any of his...

The best way to demonstrate how Chaucer never passes judgement of any of his characters is to pull lines from the text showcasing this element. An excellent way to accomplish this might be to focus...

Latest answer posted January 21, 2020 12:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What did the Friar get in return for pardons he granted?

The Friar receives money in the form of silver for granting penance. He will, it is said, "grant penance" whenever he knows he can get a "pittance," meaning a fee for the service. In a typically...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2013 2:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What are the characteristics of the friar in The Canterbury Tales?

In the "General Prologue" to The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer describes Hubert the Friar as friendly and jovial, pleasure-loving but dignified, a compassionate confessor, and one of the best...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2019 1:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

How is "The General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales" a satire of medieval society? How does Chaucer show that the...

In the General Prologue Chaucer satirizes a cross-section of Medieval English society. And the main focus of his satire is the Church. In Chaucer's day the Church was notorious for its worldliness...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2019 5:08 am UTC

2 educator answers

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What is the theme of "The Manciple's Tale"?

Like all of the Canterbury Tales, there are several different ways you can choose to read each individual tale. One way might be to compare "The Manciple's Tale" to similar tales in the...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2008 8:17 am UTC

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What are two examples of how Chaucer hints that people might not be going on the pilgrimage for spiritual and...

Chaucer's Prologue to The Canterbury Tales lays the blueprint for his tales in which the characters interact and give rise to the satire and delightful, sometimes dark, and other times edifying,...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2015 11:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Give a pen portrait of the knight in "General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales."

The knight is described in this introduction to the tales as being a man who is beyond reproach as regards his honour and devotion. He has fought in various campaigns and is very experienced in...

Latest answer posted February 2, 2013 6:48 am UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Critically discuss Chaucer's presentation of religious characters in the "General Prologue" of The Canterbury Tales.

The Canterbury Tales is satire based on stereotype. Chaucer's main objective in his presentation of religious characters then is to highlight 1) the power and wealth of the Catholic church and 2)...

Latest answer posted May 21, 2010 5:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What in your opinion is Chaucers view point regarding the social,economic and religious institutions of which his...

The social classes represented in the General Prologue are, for the most part, the aristocracy (the Knight and his son, the Squire), the clergy (Prioress, Monk, Friar, Parson, and a few nuns and...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2010 8:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

At what time of year is the story set?

In the General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer is quite explicit regarding the time of year in which the pilgrimage occurs: Whan that Aprill with his shoures soote / The droghte of March...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2020 4:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What is the analysis of "The General Prologue" in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer?

This is a very broad question because "The General Prologue" covers a great deal of information. Chaucer uses the "Prologue" to (1) introduce the narrator, who is acknowledge as Chaucer's own...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2013 10:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In The Canterbury Tales, what does the old wife say that convinces the knight to leave it up to her?

First of all, the knight is a rapist who has been saved by the women and queen. His task is to find out what women desire most. However, after a year of searching, he must return and admit defeat....

Latest answer posted February 22, 2016 7:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Which member of the emerging middle class does Chaucer portray in the most favorable light? In what way does his...

The emerging middle-class were becoming increasingly wealthy and more politically influential in Chaucer's day. It is no surprise, then, to find so many of them represented among the company of...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2019 6:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Judging from the description of the two, what does Chaucer think can cause a religious person to fail in his or her...

Which "two" are you asking about? There are several religious people in "The Canterbury Tales". The first two important ones mentioned are the Prioress and the monk. Both of these characters,...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2009 8:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Chaucer's humor is devoid of spite and malice; discuss with reference to the Prologue to The Canterbury Tales.

Chaucer is considered by many to be a man of multiple firsts: "father of the short story," "father of poetry," and (for some) "father of literature." Influenced by others, Chaucer's work has a...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2012 6:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

How does the Host quickly win the trust of all or most of the pilgrims in "The General Prologue to The Canterbury...

After the narrator describes the various pilgrims who have assembled to make the pilgrimage to Canterbury, he describes the Host and what a jolly, well-natured individual he is. He seems to be the...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2013 6:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What are some of the styles of masculinity depecited In The General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales?

Chaucer gives many descriptions of humanity in his prologue. Three that come to mind when discussing the concept of masculinity are the Knight, the Squire, and the Yeoman. We can see these styles...

Latest answer posted June 7, 2011 12:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The prologue functions in much the same way that the first act of a play does.  What is accomplished in the prologue?

The Prologue provides the frame work for the individual tales being told throughout the narrative. In this General Prologue, Chaucer outlines all the characters and briefly describes them. He also...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2009 10:11 am UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Choose and analyze a portrait from Chaucer's "General Prologue" to The Canterbury Tales. What kind of individual is...

A prioress was the head of a house of nuns; she was below an abbess in rank, but still an important person. This prioress, though supposedly dedicated to the religious life, is depicted as very...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2020 8:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Critically depict the personality traits that highlight the corruption and degradation of the Friar in Chaucer's The...

Friars were expected to live modestly and beg alms for the poor. However, Chaucer's Friar is a lecherous, greedy fellow who would rather use alms to buy gifts for his sexual conquests than aid the...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2019 8:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Identify two violations of monastic rules.

When most people think of monks, they think of unworldly ascetics leading an austere life of prayer, hard work, and devotion. But this isn't the life that Chaucer's monk leads. He's a...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2018 9:09 am UTC

1 educator answer

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

What is the significance of the Wife of Bath from The Canterbury Tales in the context of anti-religion?

The Wife of Bath isn't anti-religious, per se. In fact, virtually everyone in the Middle Ages believed in God, and there were very strict penalties for those few who didn't. It's simply that she's...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2019 5:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

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