General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales Questions and Answers

General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The various pilgrims cataloged in the General Prologue of The Canterbury Tales give the modern reader a good array of medieval English society. The characters all come from different class...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2020, 12:30 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The purpose of the prologue is to give readers a general overview of the characters that are present, why they are present there, and what they will be doing. The narrator begins by telling us how...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2018, 1:12 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The initial 30 pilgrims are all gathered at the Tabard inn prior to starting their pilgrimage. The end goal of their travels is Canterbury, which seems like a cop out answer. The reason that all...

Latest answer posted February 23, 2016, 12:18 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

At the time Geoffrey Chaucer wrote the General Prologue and the twenty-four stories in The Canterbury Tales, pilgrimages—journeys to sacred places undertaken as an act of religious devotion, an act...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2020, 3:11 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In satire, there is the use of irony, humor, and exaggeration to criticize the foibles and vices of people. Chaucer cleverly satirizes many of the pilgrims as he points to their hypocrisy. In the...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2015, 10:05 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Chaucer's General Prologue does several things: it creates both a natural and human setting for the work; gives a description, one by one, of people, or types, who represent the England of his...

Latest answer posted January 11, 2020, 5:59 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The first eighteen lines of the General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales describe the setting and the basic blot of the poem’s frame story: in the springtime, as nature reawakens, people of England...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2019, 3:54 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The Wife of Bath goes on pilgrimages to prove that she can. She's very much a proto-feminist at a time when women are expected to be demure, submissive, and chaste. For most people, going on a...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2018, 7:57 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

I have always read it as Chaucer, the traveler (he was well-traveled and educated). In addition to the other excellent answers you have received, the prologue serves to introduce the theme of...

Latest answer posted September 18, 2007, 6:23 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The overall tone of "The General Prologue" is gently satirical, with Chaucer poking fun at the representatives of each stratum of medieval society. As part of his satirical strategy, Chaucer makes...

Latest answer posted May 21, 2018, 7:05 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The General Prologue is important for several reasons. First, it establishes the frame narrative of the pilgrimage, linking the diverse tales that are to follow with a similarly diverse group of...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2020, 11:25 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

A great adjective to describe the Wife of Bath would be independent. As a wealthy widow, she enjoys the kind of independence that was very rare for a woman in those days. Her considerable wealth...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2019, 6:15 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

"The General Prologue" to The Canterbury Tales serves two main functions: to offer context for the text to follow and to introduce all of the pilgrims. In fulfilling both of these purposes, Chaucer...

Latest answer posted December 11, 2019, 2:59 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Out of the middle-class characters described, the Wife of Bath gets the most favorable description. Chaucer describes her as "good" and "worthy," even if she has a temper. Compared to the other...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2019, 1:00 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Geoffrey Chaucer, as the so-called “father of English poetry,” lived and wrote with one foot in the Middle Ages (Medieval) and the other in the period just preceding the Renaissance. We can call...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2016, 3:59 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In the "General Prologue" to The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer describes Hubert the Friar as friendly and jovial, pleasure-loving but dignified, a compassionate confessor, and one of the best...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2019, 1:41 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Geoffrey Chaucer writes a Prologue in order to frame his pilgrimage and introduce the three main segments of medieval society: the church, the court, and the common people. In addition, Chaucer...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2016, 2:13 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Without the "General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales," none of the other stories which comprise Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales would make as much sense or, frankly, have as much purpose....

Latest answer posted December 12, 2013, 9:46 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales is a story about a group of characters who travel from London to the shrine of the martyr Thomas Becket on a pilgrimage. Written in the fourteenth century,...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2015, 3:55 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The narrator in The Canterbury Tales is the lens through which we see every other character, and consequently he is at pains in the General Prologue to portray himself as a truthful person whose...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2017, 2:54 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

His basic message is that he met up with lots of people all going to the same place--which happens in April since that's when they get "pilgrimmage fever"--and they have decided to play a...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2007, 2:45 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

There are two primary women introduced in the General Prologue of Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. The first woman to be introduced is the Prioress. Her given name is Madame Eglentyne and...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2013, 2:47 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The Knight is presented first in the General Prologue of The Canterbury Tales because he has the highest social standing of all the pilgrims. In Chaucer's time, people were divided based on their...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2020, 11:12 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Chaucer's masterpiece entitled The Canterbury Tales, though unfinished, provides a valuable insight into the lives of those living in medieval England. The structural framework of the piece (the...

Latest answer posted December 19, 2012, 8:44 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The monastic tradition thrived within the medieval Church and was very much alive and kicking when Chaucer wrote The Canterbury Tales in the late 14th-century. This meant that the role of prioress...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2018, 11:48 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

After we read "the General Prologue" to The Canterbury Tales, we might think that Geoffrey Chaucer does not have a favorable opinion of the church as an institution. We should, though, keep in mind...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2020, 2:53 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The Prioress and the Monk are both members of the First Estate, a level of society into which corruption found its way. With such wrongdoing, the clergy is easily the target of Geoffrey Chaucer's...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2017, 10:06 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Contrary to many of the other characters, Geoffrey Chaucer's Parson (from The Canterbury Tales) proves to be a truly good man. Having taken a vow of poverty, the Parson lives a very poor life (in...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2013, 11:49 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In my critique of "The General Prologue," all I can see are the many positives. Chaucer changed the course of the English language when he wrote The Canterbury Tales: he used Middle English which...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2011, 1:24 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The Yeoman, who accompanies the Knight as his only servant on the pilgrimage, carries several weapons, typical of his class and duties: A sheaf of arrows, with peacock feathers, bright and sharp ....

Latest answer posted October 24, 2013, 7:50 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The other answer to this question does a really good job of providing a wide range of all the many ways that Chaucer characterizes his protagonists. I'd like to add one more feature of...

Latest answer posted June 12, 2018, 4:46 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The Squire is young, fashionable, and (perhaps most importantly) amorous. The reader knows that the Squire is young because he is described immediately after the famous Knight who "had his son...

Latest answer posted October 9, 2009, 2:10 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In the General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, the narrator starts by telling the reader that pilgrims often go on trips to the martyr's shrine in April. The martyr he is referring to is Thomas...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2016, 1:28 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

We know from the early lines of the introduction to the Pardoner in "The General Prologue" that the narrating Pilgrim feels unsympathetic toward the Pardoner since he is introduced as the friend of...

Latest answer posted May 13, 2012, 6:03 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In The General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, one of several amazing things about this piece of literature is that Chaucer includes himself as one of the members of the pilgrimage. He is simply...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2015, 7:40 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The Enotes page on iambic pentameter (to which I have provided a link below) does a great job of providing simple examples of scansion of iambic pentameter. The first thing to understand about...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2010, 7:17 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In the General Prologue Chaucer satirizes a cross-section of Medieval English society. And the main focus of his satire is the Church. In Chaucer's day the Church was notorious for its worldliness...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2019, 5:08 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The Prologue to The Canterbury Tales provides reasons for pilgrimage as well as a frame for the tales that follow. Geoffrey Chaucer relates the pilgrims' desires to the seasons, and he includes...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2018, 9:12 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Details on the physical description of the Doctor in The Canterbury Tales are extremely sparse, at least within the confines of the General Prologue. Most of what is said of the Doctor pertains to...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2014, 6:31 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In the General Prologue, the Knight is described as a "worthy man" (line 43). He has the highest class level out of all the people on the pilgrimage, so that is most likely the reason he is...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2016, 7:09 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales were written about 1380. They were written in Middle English, which was used after the Norman conquest (1066) until about 1500. Chaucer's general prologue is a...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2016, 11:01 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Chaucer's realism is inextricably linked to the way his poem The Canterbury Tales mirrors English society in the 14th century. To see how this trend works, it helps to look at the "General...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2016, 9:52 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In the General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer describes each of the characters who will be going on a pilgrimage, and among them is a monk. A monk is one who has determined to...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2013, 10:29 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Like the Prioress and the Monk before him, the Friar is another representative of the religious establishment who fails to any of the expected virtues. Among other things, He hadde madd full many...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2013, 3:11 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In the General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer is quite explicit regarding the time of year in which the pilgrimage occurs: Whan that Aprill with his shoures soote / The droghte of March...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2020, 4:04 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In interpreting the character of the Squire as presented in the “General Prologue” to Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, it is important to remember not only that he is the son of the Knight...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2011, 7:34 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In the General Prologue of The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer is seemingly very critical of most of the pilgrims who are associated with the Catholic Church. One can very clearly see this criticism...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2010, 5:37 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The Parson and the Plowman both seem too good to be true, but Chaucer does not seem to be painting their characters with a satirical brush. Chaucer included several misbehaving ecclesiastical...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2016, 3:15 pm (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

In the time that Geoffrey Chaucer wrote 'The Prologue,' English society was religious, strict and superstitous about Hell, but it was also bawdy, rude and disrespectful in certain circles. It is...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2010, 12:17 am (UTC)

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General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

The answer to your question is given in the very first line of the General Prologue to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. It is in April that folk longen to goon on pilgrimages. Chaucer's Middle English...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2012, 12:12 pm (UTC)

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