Flannery O'Connor Questions and Answers

Flannery O'Connor

Flannery O’Connor’s writings were influenced by both her Southern location and her Catholic upbringing. Unlike some writers whose adventurous lives are as exciting as the stories they tell (such as...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2019, 3:12 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Flannery O'Connor

Flannery O'Connor was influenced by several Southern writers of great repute, like William Faulkner and Eudora Welty, as well as Modernist writers like T.S. Eliot and Joseph Conrad. These are only...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2018, 10:01 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Flannery O'Connor

Mary Grace and Hulga are similar in being angry young adult women who are living with their mothers. They do not conform to Southern norms about how genteel ladies are supposed to act or look. Both...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2020, 12:12 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

Flannery O'Connor

The two stories follow an extremely similar narrative structure, with almost indistinguishable protagonists. These protagonists are older women who do not understand or attempt to understand the...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2020, 12:12 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

Flannery O'Connor

A writer in the Southern Gothic style, Flannery O'Connor departs from other writers of this genre in several ways. Violence as a means of redemption While Gothic writers of the South often...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2014, 7:00 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

The above answer has addressed the question very thoroughly, so I will try to get at some core issues in both stories. In short, I would argue that while both are evil characters, Manley Pointer is...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2017, 5:04 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Flannery O'Connor

Both women realize that life is not as it seems and that the many of their ways were wrong and pointless. The protagonist in "Revelation" was rather rude and elitist and by the end of...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2008, 6:22 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Manley Pointer and the Misfit are both morally dubious characters who nevertheless bring about a spiritual re-evaluation in the protagonist of their respective stories. In "Good Country People,"...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2018, 3:23 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Flannery O’Connor often uses violence in her stories for a number of reasons. In the first place, O’Connor felt that most human beings, at least in the modern era, live complacent, comfortable,...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2011, 2:52 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

In all—or almost all—of O'Connor's stories, one of her characters has a moment of revelation or illumination, when the grace of God breaks into this person's life and shows a glimpse of God's love...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2017, 6:43 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Flannery O’Connor’s Roman Catholic beliefs color her stories which include violence and violent people alongside the faith and grace found by many of her characters. “Good Country People” and...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2013, 7:59 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

The short story "A Temple of the Holy Ghost" by Flannery O'Connor tells of the visit of two 14-year-old girls, Susan and Joanne, to the home of a 12-year-old girl, referred to only as "the child"...

Latest answer posted November 9, 2019, 5:36 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Flannery O’Connor believed she had to use violence to shock people into paying attention to her themes. She said in her letters that "if the Christian faith is present, readers will understand the...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2010, 10:45 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

In Edora Welty's “Petrified Man” and Flannery O'Connor's “Good Country People,” the characters operate on the conviction that appearance and reality are essentially the same; this conviction...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2022, 5:19 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

A story which has nothing to offer someone with no religious faith cannot have much to offer even those who do have faith. The fact that this question is asked of Flannery O'Connor at all is at...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2020, 4:36 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

In "A Good Man is Hard to Find," the thematic irony is built around the disparity between the grandmother's view of herself and the reality. She feels that what defines a "good man" is the kind of...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2013, 7:23 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

The views of Mrs. Hopewell from "Good Country People" and the grandmother in "A Good Man Is Hard to Find" toward religion are most likely similar, but the approach of the two women are somewhat...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2009, 3:35 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

In "A Good Man is Hard to Find," O'Connor illustrates the theme that God's grace can fall on any of us. The grandmother, a manipulative, narrow-minded, difficult person, might be the last person...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2020, 1:33 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

In her analyses of O'Connor earlier short stories' use of spatiality, Louise Westling observes there is a "strong sense of place despite the absence of a geopolitical region", and characters are...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2014, 6:21 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

One thing that "A Good Man Is Hard to Find" and "Good Country People" have in common is the theme of innocence versus corruption. Both share this notion of "good country people," a kind of myth...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2022, 12:42 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Although Julian's mother is racist—believing that African Americans ought to succeed, but only on "their side of the fence"—she is not vicious. She is condescending and wrong, certainly, but she...

Latest answer posted December 25, 2018, 11:06 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Flannery O'Connor

A great deal of O'Connor's characterization has, obviously, to do with her own approach to life and her search for meaning through the relatively difficult portions of her life. They are described...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2010, 10:57 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

In her "Christ-haunted" South, Flannery O'Connor encountered many faith-based Christians who, in their horror of sin, shielded themselves with sanctimony from their own faults. One character who...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2011, 5:07 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Flannery O'Connor once wrote that she lived in the "Christ-haunted South." That is, O'Connor found herself in an area of evangelicals and their horror of sin which is part of the "landscape," while...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2011, 4:51 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Similarities and differences exist between many characters in Flannery O’Connor’s stories, including between Claude and Mrs. Turpin in “Revelation” and the grandmother and The Misfit in “A Good Man...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2011, 2:56 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

O'Connor uses nature as a buffer between what appears to be and what really is. As a Christian believer, O'Connor sees beyond nature (the sun, clouds, and sky) to see the supernatural (God,...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2010, 12:13 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

My personal favorite story is "Everything that Rises Must Converge". Prejudice meets contempt and one person's narrowness is trumped by the next person's bias. The task of escaping bigotry and...

Latest answer posted January 12, 2012, 10:37 pm (UTC)

6 educator answers

Flannery O'Connor

I returned this question to you and am glad you clarified it. Since you are writing on Flannery O'Connor rather than a specific work she wrote, one way to begin would be to investigate what...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2018, 9:00 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

The first part of the sentence it seems to have words missing; the first clause, "The factor of violence always presents in Flannery O'Connor's stories," clearly is missing its predicate. Perhaps,...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2011, 1:09 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Reading O'Connor's "A Good Man is Hard to Find" is a start for your understanding of how violence leads to salvation. You may also wish to read some criticisms of this story and others as well as...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2011, 5:11 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Flannery O'Connor has been called many things religious: a Christian humanist, a sacramental writer, a fundamentalist, a Yahwist, a mean Christian, and my favorite, a "Roman Catholic not like a...

Latest answer posted November 23, 2009, 8:37 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

The identification of “southern writer” may be applied to any author who lives in, sets their works in, or writes about characters who hail from the US South. It is often applied to those authors...

Latest answer posted March 16, 2019, 1:20 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Flannery O’Connor was a deeply devout Roman Catholic and wrote from an obviously Christian (and particularly Catholic) perspective when she became an adult author. Yet she seems to have been a...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2011, 8:29 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Flannery O'Connor was truly a genius and an extremely gifted writer. I think that there are two major things in her life that influenced her writing; her religion and her disease. She was a very...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2010, 8:35 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Technically, four characters are named in the story: Mrs. Turpin, Claude, Mary Grace, and Miss Finley. However, Miss Finley is a character with a momentary appearance of no consequence whatsoever,...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2019, 5:40 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Flannery O'Connor

Perhaps O’Connor’s own words can help you come up with a subtitle. In her letters, O’Connor wrote: “I am mighty tired of reading reviews that call “A Good Man” brutal and sarcastic. The stories...

Latest answer posted December 9, 2010, 12:09 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Both of these stories by Flannery O'Connor are social critiques set in a changing American South, and both feature an elderly female protagonist who is in some way struggling with social change. In...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2020, 7:01 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

O'Connor depicts the South in her stories as backwards place populated by unsophisticated people who are behind the times. Many of her characters are what are called grotesques, because O'Connor...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2020, 8:06 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Flannery O'Connor

Two goals O'Connor had in her stories are as follows: first, God's grace is bigger than whatever horror faces us; and second, God can profoundly touch the lives of very flawed people. In other...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2017, 11:58 am (UTC)

1 educator answer