On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

by John Keats
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On First Looking into Chapman's Homer Questions and Answers

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

The "realms of gold" in the first line of the poem refers to the translation of Homer by George Chapman that Keats is reading. In this sonnet, Keats compares reading this translation to the...

Latest answer posted March 17, 2019 3:26 pm UTC

2 educator answers

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

John Keats wrote this poem in reaction to having read "The Iliad" and/or "The Odyssey" by Homer. In the first 4 lines, the poet says that he has often been to the "realms...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2008 9:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

Keats uses the extended metaphor of exploration to describe that wonderful moment when he first delved into Chapman's translation of Homer. For Keats, reading Chapman's Homer was as much a voyage...

Latest answer posted January 21, 2018 10:16 am UTC

2 educator answers

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

Certainly, the poem expresses the extreme benefits conferred on the individual by the practice of reading. This speaker has read a lot, and yet, when he first read Chapman’s translation of Homer’s...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2019 4:49 pm UTC

2 educator answers

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

Interestingly, John Keats, at twenty-one, could not read Greek and was probably acquainted with Homer's Iliad and Odyssey only from having read the translations of Alexander Pope, which apparently...

Latest answer posted May 13, 2010 12:25 am UTC

2 educator answers

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

John Keats’ poem, “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” is written in the form of a Petrarchan sonnet, consisting of an octave rhymed ABBAABBA and a sestet rhymed CDCDCD. As is traditional in the...

Latest answer posted February 29, 2012 8:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

In addition to the allusion to Homer, the description of Homer is metaphoric, as well. "The deep-brow'd Homer" refers to Homer's brillancy as Keats is highly impressed with both his intellectual...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2010 6:09 am UTC

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On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

John Keats uses several techniques in his excellent poem "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer," but I've chosen to focus on two of them: first on his use of the Italian sonnet, and second on his...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2016 5:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

Concerning's Keats's "On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer," I'll add a bit of explanation to the above paraphrase. The "realms of gold" that the speaker has traveled are metaphorical--he has read...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2010 2:12 am UTC

2 educator answers

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

Yes, Keats uses symbolism in this sonnet. I'll identify one of them for you.A symbol is a term used to represent something else by association. In lines 1-2, the narrator says "Much have I...

Latest answer posted March 25, 2008 10:12 am UTC

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On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

The similes in this poem show how much wonder and awe the speaker feels. The main point of this poem is that the speaker feels awe and wonder when he first looks into this particular work of...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2010 10:34 pm UTC

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On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

The key section is:Oft of one wide expanse had I been told That deep-brow’d Homer ruled as his demesne; Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out...

Latest answer posted February 29, 2012 8:08 am UTC

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On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

I can help you with a summary of "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer," by Keats. I don't know if it will be "full" or not, since I'm not sure what that is. The speaker has traveled widely...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2010 11:27 pm UTC

1 educator answer

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

"On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer," by John Keats is a poem about discovery in general, and about discovery through literature in particular. A brief summary would be: I've been to lots of...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2009 12:13 pm UTC

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On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

See: http://www.enotes.com/first-looking-into-chapmans-homer-salem/first-looking-into-chapmans-homer...

Latest answer posted February 29, 2012 8:32 am UTC

1 educator answer

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

So you are asking which two words in this poem show us that Homer is present in the poem? If so, I would say "deep-brow'd Homer" indicates that Homer is present. Other than that, there are many...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2010 10:30 pm UTC

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On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

The perfectly captured emotion of the conclusion to "On First Looking into Champman's Homer" sets this sonnet apart and, indeed, heralded the brilliance of Keats as a rising star among poets. John...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2019 5:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

Concerning "On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer," by Keats, you probably need to look elsewhere for your medieval settings. And while the lines you quote refer to exotic locations, the poem...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2010 12:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

This sonnet by Keats would give heartburn to a new critic because the essence of New Criticism is to critique a work on its own literary merits, apart from any historical context or biographical...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2010 11:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer