Questions and Answers for Doctor Faustus

Doctor Faustus

Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus is perhaps one of the best known tragedies. It definitely differs from a traditional Greek tragedy, as Faustus doesn't have a high birth status (like a king,...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2012 7:14 pm UTC

9 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

The primary themes of Doctor Faustus are the relationship between knowledge and power and the consequences of attempting to attain knowledge beyond a certain extent. The play's protagonist, Doctor...

Latest answer posted March 25, 2020 12:03 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

Morality plays were Christian plays first performed by traveling troupes during the Middle Ages to communicate a moral message about sin and salvation. They kept audiences entertained with vivid...

Latest answer posted December 25, 2019 10:21 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

Renaissance, as we know, was a widespread cultural and educational movement in history during which the old conventions of medieval age were dissolved followed by liberation in all arenas of life...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2012 4:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

Marlowe's play is often framed as entering into a debate between medieval and Renaissance values, with Faustus representing the Renaissance. The term "Renaissance man" refers to the individuals in...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2020 2:24 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

The main cause of Dr. Faustus's downfall is his hubris, or overweening pride. Faustus has a pretty good life, overall, but he's still not satisfied. He wants power; he wants to be renowned the...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2018 8:37 am UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

In Scene XIV of Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, we meet Faustus speaking with two or three Scholars about the subject of "fair ladies". The Scholars had chosen Helen of Troy as the most...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2012 10:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

"Homo fuge" is simply the Latin for "Fly, man!" These words appear on Faustus's arm after he makes his diabolical pact with the Devil, selling his soul in return for twenty-four years of incredible...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2018 7:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

This play cannot be viewed as solely being about the Renaissance age. Rather, Marlow presents the clash of Renaissance values and medieval values in this play and through the person of Doctor...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2013 2:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

Christopher Marlowe wrote The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus in about 1590, at a time when England was at the height of its Renaissance, in the latter part of the reign of...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2019 4:13 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

The Good Angel and the Evil Angel in Marlowe's Dr Faustus are physical manifestations of the good and evil impulses that battle for supremacy in Faustus's conscience. Bringing the two competing...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2019 3:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

In some senses, it's both. On the one hand, Faustus's damnation is tragic because he could've been a great man without having to sell his soul to Lucifer. There was simply no need for it. But...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2019 9:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

Mephistopheles acts as a kind of intermediary between Dr. Faustus and Lucifer. He's the one who keeps Faustus happy with all the goodies he was promised in return for his mortal soul, such as...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2019 6:07 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

Faustus in the world of Marlowe First, you need to observe Faustus in his element to be able to decipher him. He lived in 16th century (Renaissance) Europe. These were times when academia began to...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2009 10:05 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

The greatest irony in Dr. Faustus is his hubris(excessive pride), and his faith in his own mortal powers to command the service of devils. in the end, he is torn limb from limb, and his soul is...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2015 10:47 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

In Christopher Marlowe’s play, much as in a Greek tragedy, Faustus is brought down by a fatal flaw. There is an element of his character that is destined to clash with the proper workings of the...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2019 4:47 am UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

Doctor Faustus isn't a hero. He performs no heroic deeds and, in fact, bargains away his soul for an eternity for a short time with more power. He is the protagonist of the story and perhaps the...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2019 3:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

The words consummatum est are also ironic because in the Vulgate Latin text of the Gospel of John (19:30), these are the last words that Jesus speaks before he dies on the cross: cum ergo...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2015 7:20 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

The fate of Dr. Faustus can be interpreted from both angles. To a large extent, it depends on one's personal beliefs. On the face of it, it does seem that Faustus only has himself to blame for his...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2018 11:51 am UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

With a terrifying sense of inevitability Doctor Faustus meets with a pretty sticky end. It's act 5, scene 3, and the First Scholar can hear blood-curdling screams coming from Faustus's room. As the...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2019 9:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

The most striking parallel between Lucifer and Doctor Faustus in Christopher Marlowe's The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus is that Lucifer and Faustus are their own worst...

Latest answer posted January 14, 2020 3:00 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus uses both blank verse and free verse to set the rhythm for the tale. Blank verse simply means that the lines do not rhyme; although it does follow iambic...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2019 4:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

The deal that Faustus makes with Mephistophilis—twenty-four years of earthly power in exchange for his soul—might seem, on the face of it, like a good one. Faustus is itching to exert more power...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2019 5:21 am UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

Doctor Faustus is both a morality play and a Renaissance drama, since the two are not mutually exclusive categories of drama. The play shows a man selling his own soul for power when all the normal...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2019 3:19 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

Scene 1 of Christopher Marlowe's The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus opens with a lengthy soliloquy by Doctor Faustus, in which he praises himself as what is now termed a...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2020 7:33 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

Both of these elements are certainly present in Marlowe's Dr Faustus. The element of peripeteia in a drama—or, indeed, any other literary work—represents a turning point for the character, or a...

Latest answer posted January 9, 2019 6:53 am UTC

3 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

This quotation is part of an early discussion between Faustus and Mephistopheles regarding what Faustus will be able to receive in exchange for his soul. Faustus has achieved everything one could...

Latest answer posted December 26, 2018 2:32 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

The character of Doctor Faustus certainly coincides well with the tragic flaw theory of character development. From the opening lines, the reader already gets a sense that Faustus has an...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2009 6:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

In scene 5 of Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, the title character signs the contract giving Lucifer his soul in exchange for twenty-four years of Mephistophilis's obedience to do whatever...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2019 9:34 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

In traditional European literature, especially fables and fairy tales, a day often equals a year. As a result, although granting Faustus 24 years of as much knowledge as his brain can handle in...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2018 7:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

To understand these lines from Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe, you first need to appreciate the circumstance in which he finds himself. He has sold his soul to the devil in order to obtain...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2016 4:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

Faustus views the traditional disciplines of "analytics," "economy" and "physic" to be too confining for him. They do not allow him to satisfy his true ambitions. Magic, on the other hand, offers...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2017 3:07 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

Christopher Marlowe’s Elizabethan tragedy, The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus, traces the damnation of the protagonist using a traditional unified plot with a beginning, middle, and end....

Latest answer posted February 14, 2020 3:56 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

The question of what Doctor Faustus wanted is critical to understanding whether his plan failed or succeeded and, in correlation, whether the price he paid was worth the gain he procured. This,...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2011 9:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

The Chorus in Marlowe's Dr. Faustus, the inspiration for Goethe's Faust Parts I & II, serves two purposes. First, it is transitional and, second, it is expository. The first purpose of the...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2009 10:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

If we look at the broad definitions of comedy and tragedy, we understand that a comedy is a play in which nobody dies, even if bad things do happen. A tragedy is a play in which the stage is...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2019 10:31 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

Everyman, composed in the late 15th century by an unknown author, is a good deal more simplistic in its presentation of good and evil than Christopher Marlowe's 1592 play Doctor Faustus. The...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2020 7:58 am UTC

3 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

The importance of any work of literature is clearly a matter for debate. There must be a great many people in the world to whom Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus is not remotely important. Nonetheless, some...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2019 7:45 am UTC

4 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

Doctor Faustus ends with the title character being savagely ripped to pieces by evil devils before his soul his dragged down to Hell, where it will spend eternity in the company of Lucifer and all...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2019 9:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

The Chorus in Christopher Marlowe's The Tragical History Of Doctor Faustus performs many of the same functions as the Chorus in ancient Greek plays, as well as in other Elizabethan plays, such as...

Latest answer posted October 25, 2019 6:52 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

Dr. Faustus is riven with internal conflict throughout the play. He craves worldly fame and success and is prepared to sign up to a devilish bargain in order to obtain them. Yet he never feels...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2018 7:52 am UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

This quotation is found in the Chorus of Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus. The Chorus introduces us to Doctor Faustus's character, starting with his infancy, and throughout his lifespan until...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2012 5:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

A brief encapsulation of Faustus's mental conflict begins with the description given by the Chorus in Act I, scene i of Dr. Faustus and ends with the Chorus's summary of his plight. The Chorus...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2011 11:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

Envy is the act of resenting the good fortune, power, health, or appearance (among other things) of other people. It also includes the act of wishing away those good qualities from those who...

Latest answer posted May 20, 2012 11:39 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

European Renaissance thought centered around the belief that man had the right to value and to celebrate earthly life and also to improve himself and advance; although, the latter idea did not...

Latest answer posted June 4, 2018 3:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

One comic scene is that with the horse-courser (one who trains horses to be raced) while Faustus and Mephistophilis are at the Emperor's court. The courser wants to buy Faustus' horse for its...

Latest answer posted February 6, 2012 10:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

Part of the reason that Marlowe's Faustus is tragic is due to our own susceptibilities and foibles that would compel us to do the same. This is to say that Faustuts' tragic flaw was his greed....

Latest answer posted July 25, 2009 8:26 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

Drama and poetry are two distinct literary forms that, when combined, can create a powerful literary work in its own right. Dramatists like Christopher Marlowe and his contemporary, William...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2020 3:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Doctor Faustus

Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, written sometime between 1589–92, is in early modern English. Early modern English began to be used about 1500 and was in use until about 1700, when it was replaced by...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2019 8:26 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Doctor Faustus

Faustus abuses his power from the very beginning of the play. He uses his intellectual capacities and the knowledge he gained from his study of divinity to summon demons. He states in his initial...

Latest answer posted April 28, 2018 9:16 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Showing 1-50 of 256