Farewell To Manzanar Questions and Answers

Farewell To Manzanar

When Mama breaks the dishes, it shows that she won't be a victim, even in the most trying of circumstances. Her behavior is also significant, because it highlights the suffering endured by many...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2019, 2:43 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

The most humiliating aspect of the internment of Japanese and Japanese American people during World War II was the U.S. government’s deliberate violation of their constitutional rights through...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2019, 3:59 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

With a novel based on a true story, like Farewell to Manzanar, we should use caution when interpreting actions and objects as symbols. The events in the story really did happen to the author, so...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2016, 2:55 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

In Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston's novel Farewell to Manzanar, the author/narrator explains that her father had always served his role as family patriarch with true honor. After all, he was a...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2021, 7:56 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

The simple answer is that they were afraid of the future: whatever else life might have been in the confinement of the internment camp, at least it was certain. When the Supreme Court deemed the...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2019, 6:59 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

Here is another good quote from the book Farewell to Manzanar: Like so many of the women there, Mama never did get used to the latrines. It was a humiliation she just learned to endure: shigata ga...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2019, 10:10 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

The narrator, seven-year-old Jeanne Wakatsuki, is living with her family in Long Beach, California in 1941, where her father is a fisherman. One Sunday in December, the fishing boats set off as...

Latest answer posted October 9, 2009, 1:50 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Papa is arrested and sent to Ft. Lincoln as part of the internment of any Japanese and Japanese Americans in the western United States during World War II. Not long after arriving at Ft. Lincoln,...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2018, 4:25 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

Early in Jeanne Wakatsuki-Houston’s memoir (coauthored by her husband, James D. Houston) Farewell to Manzanar, the author, who narrates the story of her family’s persecution and imprisonment in an...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2019, 3:26 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

Jeanne Wakatsuki's Farewell to Manzanar paints a disturbing picture of a dark chapter of American History, specifically the internment of Japanese citizens into camps, in this case Manzanar. The...

Latest answer posted March 18, 2019, 7:33 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

The effect that the camp has on Jeanne is her loss of profound connection with her family. Jeanne's father was a proud and dignified man who abandoned everything to come to America due to what he...

Latest answer posted April 3, 2019, 9:06 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

Jeanne Wakatsuki was at Manzanar for three-and-a-half years. On February 25, 1942, all individuals of Japanese descent were ordered to evacuate Terminal Island, California, where the Wakatsukis...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2010, 7:38 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Papa raised premium strawberries just outside of San Jose, California in the early 1950's. We find this out in Chapter 21: "Girl of My Dreams." Because the novel mostly deals with life in the...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2016, 9:35 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Farewell to Manzanar follows the resettlement of Jeanne Wakatsuki and her family to a Japanese-American internment camp in the Owens Valley bordering the eastern Sierra Nevada. These "evacuees" are...

Latest answer posted June 12, 2016, 11:53 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

The bombing of Pearl Harbor, the arrest of Jeanne's father, and the clearing of Terminal Island are all three major causes of events in the story; each one has an effect on Jeanne and her family's...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2018, 5:16 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

The lack of privacy was one of the most dehumanizing aspects of the internment camps where Japanese Americans were detained during WWII. These camps were surrounded by barbed wire and guard towers...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2009, 3:21 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

I believe that only one member of Jeanne's family dies in the book; a sister-in-law not in the immediate family. The Wakatsukis are a very large family. There are ten Wakatsuki children, so many...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2010, 2:53 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

The Wakatsuki family runs into clothing problems at the beginning of Chapter 3. When they arrive at the camp, they find that no appropriate bedding has been provided for them. Instead, they must...

Latest answer posted March 8, 2020, 8:28 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Prior to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and the United States' subsequent entry into World War II, Jeanne's family were fully committed to pursuing the American Dream. Despite living in a...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2018, 1:40 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Papa was a "dark, bitter, brooding presence" in the cubicle that was home to the Wakatsukis in Manzanar. Upon his return from North Dakota, where he had been forced to work as an interpreter...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2009, 6:38 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

The teacher in Boyle Heights is unfriendly to Jeanne because people in California are becoming more and more suspicious of Japanese-Americans. Jeanne comments that the experience with her teacher...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2013, 8:46 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston was able to bid farewell to the Manzanar internment camp after World War II, when the United States government released the Japanese and Japanese American families that had...

Latest answer posted June 1, 2019, 11:49 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

The original question had to be edited. Jeanne believes that her father's decision not to have her baptized was correct because it enabled her to maintain some of her original identity. At the...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2013, 2:46 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

After returning from North Dakota, Jeanne's Father, Ko Wakatsuki, was angry and bitter, "not the same man...something terrible had happened to him in North Dakota...He had aged ten years. He...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2009, 11:14 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

In Farewell To Manzanar, Jeanne tells us that her mother never did get used to using the latrines. The smell of it spoiled what little appetite we had...the floor was covered with excrement, and...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2015, 8:10 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

This question is referring to what happens after the Wakatsuki family leaves the internment camp and comes back to the Los Angeles area. They get a place to stay in a houising project in Long...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2010, 12:14 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

The answer to this question is a fairly simple one: Jeanne's mother blamed her father for remaining in the camp because Jeanne's father could not bypass his fear. Mama, herself, admits the...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2015, 4:23 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

If you want one quote from Farewell to Manzanar that briefly answers this question, you can find it at the end of Chapter 4. In general, we can say that the shikata ga nai attitude affected the...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2015, 8:42 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

In order to find the answer to this, you have to go a bit beyond the place where the internees are given the surplus clothing from World War I. If you continue reading to the next paragraph, you...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2012, 10:56 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Even as an American soldier (albeit with Japanese heritage), Woody decides to visit Ka-ke, Japan in order to reconnect with his Japanese roots. It is 1946, and Woody's pull to his ancestry is...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2015, 3:52 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

I believe that you are talking about what happens in Chapter 19. You can find more details about this answer at the very start of that chapter. In that chapter, the Wakatsuki family is about to...

Latest answer posted April 25, 2010, 7:01 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston’s memoir, Farewell to Manzanar, describes her experience of growing up in Japanese internment camps in America during World War II. Early in the narrative, eleven-year-old...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2019, 9:19 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

So you are only talking about Chapter 2, where the family has just been sent to Manzanar, right? If so, we see them have problems as soon as they get there. First of all, they go to have dinner...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2010, 11:18 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Farewell to Manzanar is ultimately a story about coming to understand one’s place in the grand scheme of culture and society. Jeanne, a young Japanese girl in the memoir, is entirely American—but...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2019, 4:56 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Although life in the camp was cramped and uncomfortable for many reasons, one of the worst issues with the Wakatsuki family's housing situation was the dust that kept on blowing into the barracks...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2016, 9:52 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Manzanar is located in the Owens Valley; the area was once green with orchards and alfalfa fields. When the family is relocated to Block 28 at Manzanar in the spring of 1943, Jeanne notices that...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2015, 9:49 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

The Wakatsuki family did not really subscribe to any religion. Jeanne says, "Culturally we were like those Jews who observe certain traditions but never visit a synagogue. We kept a little...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2010, 8:09 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Using the novel, Farewell to Manzanar, collaborators or informers are objects of hatred and fear for good reasons. In World War II, informers turned in their neighbors for simple things and as a...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2015, 4:07 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

In chapter 11 of Farewell to Manzanar, the Japanese Americans in the internment camp are asked to sign a Loyalty Oath, which leaves many of them in a position where they feel there is no good...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018, 12:01 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Dinner was always a joyous occasion at Jeanne's house. Her family's huge round wooden dining table was the biggest piece of furniture they owned, big enough to seat twelve or thirteen people. And...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2019, 7:31 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

In Farewell to Manzanar, Jeanne Wakatsuki recounts her experience being sent to an internment camp with other Japanese Americans during world war two. The first part of the memoir recounts the...

Latest answer posted July 11, 2019, 8:41 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

In Farewell to Manzanar, a memoir based on the experience of one Japanese family held in an internment camp during World War II, the characters of Papa and Woody shed light on the intergenerational...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2019, 10:23 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

Papa assimilated into American life through his zealous embrace of its promise of happiness, while Mama's experience was more steady and willing to accept the hardships and suffering that comes...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2016, 3:49 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

In the story, Jeanne imagines that hatred looks like a "dark, amorphous cloud" that will descend and enclose her family forever. This frightening imagery describes how Jeanne feels about her...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2018, 1:51 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

Jeanne learns a lot about the attitudes of her white neighbors when she and her family move to Boyle Heights. It is here that Jeanne experiences overt racism for the first time. She recalls how her...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2018, 2:35 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Farewell To Manzanar

The members of Jeanne's family who belongs to the Issei, or "first generation," are her father and mother. These folks were born in Japan and immigrated to the US. We learn in Chapter 1 that...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2016, 11:02 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

As Jeanne explains at the beginning of Chapter 12, the family's move to Block 28 was a major turning point for them: a time when their lives became "tolerable" instead of "outrageous." The move...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2016, 11:17 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

The quickest way to describe Terminal Island in the time that the Wakatsuki family lived there (without the dad, of course) is to say that it was a company town owned by the fishing companies. The...

Latest answer posted February 2, 2010, 7:36 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

There are two factors that would have been likely to cause the government to label all Japanese as saboteurs or to say that they were all “sinister.” One factor is discussed in the book and has to...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2013, 1:58 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Farewell To Manzanar

Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston’s memoir of her and her family’s years in an internment camp during World War II provides important insight into the Japanese American experience and the role of racism in...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2020, 6:28 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Showing 1-50 of 111