Farewell, My Lovely Questions and Answers

Farewell, My Lovely

Raymond Chandler, who was a notoriously heavy drinker, used liquor for various purposes in his novels, perhaps nowhere as much as in Farewell, My Lovely. When Marlowe goes to see Jessie Florian at...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2016 6:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Farewell, My Lovely

Farewell, My Lovely was first published in 1940. It is a noir novel and is the second in Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe series. Anne Riordan is the antithesis of Velma Valento. Anne works as a...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2019 8:52 am UTC

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Farewell, My Lovely

The resolution of Farewell, My Lovely is that Marlowe realizes that Mrs. Grayle is actually Malloy's missing girlfriend Velma, and she is desperate to keep her disguise. She is so desperate, in...

Latest answer posted December 28, 2009 5:33 am UTC

1 educator answer

Farewell, My Lovely

Raymond Chandler was not like his creation Philip Marlowe in most respects, except for the fact that both author and hero liked to drink. Chandler was perhaps creating the kind of man he would like...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2013 10:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Farewell, My Lovely

Raymond Chandler, creator of Philip Marlowe, was born in the U.S. but educated in England. According to Magill's Survey of American Literature: Chandler attended Dulwich College, a typical English...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2013 11:42 pm UTC

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Farewell, My Lovely

In the wake of Lindsay Marriott's murder, Marlowe is rummaging around his jacket pocket in an attempt to get to the bottom of the matter. As well as finding some marijuana cigarettes, he also comes...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2021 6:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Farewell, My Lovely

Philip Marlowe, the protagonist of Raymond Chandler's series of "hard boiled" detective novels, is white. There may be some confusion about his racial identity because his stories often dealt with...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2007 11:27 pm UTC

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Farewell, My Lovely

Though your question is quite clear, the term "crime fiction" is open to many interpretations. Ronald Knox codified the ten most important elements of a detective story in the 1920s; you can see...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2013 6:23 am UTC

1 educator answer