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  • Fahrenheit 451
    The words you quoted are spoken by Granger to Montag at the end of the story. The "odd minority" refers to Granger's fellow intellectuals. They are said to be a "minority crying in the...

    Asked by user3189603 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    During Montag and Clarisse's first conversation, she tells him that she had heard that long ago firemen used to put out fires instead of starting them. Montag's initial reaction is to laugh at...

    Asked by arnpangel on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451, the protagonist Guy Montag murders fire chief Beatty in an act of impulsive desperation. After the firemen are deployed to Montag's house, Beatty reveals that Montag's hidden...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Bradbury's dystopian society, books are censored, and intellectual pursuits are considered illegal. The population is completely ignorant, and the citizens are addicted to mass media and...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Throughout Bradbury's dystopian society, information is restricted by censoring books, arresting intellectuals, and the overwhelming influence of state-controlled media outlets. The fireman agency...

    Asked by user6627136 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Ray Bradbury prevents his narrative from becoming too pessimistic because there is a subtle mood of hope generated through characters and incidents in the plot. In other dystopian works, such as...

    Asked by user5535481 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    There are a number of similarities and differences between Fahrenheit 451 and 1984. Beginning with the similarities, both novels tell the story of a male protagonist who starts out as part of the...

    Asked by eugeniodavidson on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Towards the end of the novel, Montag floats downriver, where he eventually joins a group of traveling intellectuals camping out in the wilderness. The hobo intellectuals welcome Montag into their...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Throughout Ray Bradbury's masterpiece Fahrenheit 451, the idea of literature—and books in general—becoming illegal plays a pivotal role in the plot and underlying meaning of the novel. The...

    Asked by cocostevens01 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451, Montag is perhaps best known for taking risks. He takes a risk when he steals books and hides them behind the grille of his ventilator. He also takes a risk when he starts...

    Asked by jamesgardner987 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451, Montag and Mildred do not get divorced but they do separate from each other. In fact, Mildred leaves Montag because she becomes increasingly frustrated with his desire to read...

    Asked by ahdasad47 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury uses the snake as a symbol of censorship and control because of its association with the firemen. Montag describes the firehose as a "spitting python," for example, and...

    Asked by novsinghi07 on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    There are historical allusions, mythological allusions, Biblical allusions, and literary allusions in Fahrenheit 451. These references serve to illuminate Bradbury's themes of censorship and...

    Asked by jamesgardner987 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Toward the beginning of the novel, Captain Beatty informs Montag that firemen are allowed to possess a book for twenty-four hours before they burn it on their own. However, if the fireman does not...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    There are a number of similarities between the technology of our world and that of Fahrenheit 451. Firstly, although we do not have TV walls such as those in Montag's parlor, television is a deeply...

    Asked by rt1622 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Faber means that people who don't want to contribute to society often end up destroying it. Montag explains to Faber that Captain Beatty has read a lot of books—because of this, he's...

    Asked by smiliekylie2002 on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451, Granger and the other professors preserve books by memorizing them. Granger explains that they used to read the books and burn them or put them onto microfilm, but neither of...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Arguably, it is Montag's meeting and subsequent friendship with Clarisse McClellan which contributes the most to his transformation. First, notice how Bradbury highlights the significance of their...

    Asked by arriarang on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Toward the beginning of the novel, Montag and Clarisse walk by her home, and Montag notices that all the lights in her house are on. Montag, who finds it unusual to see that many lights on in a...

    Asked by jordanditto on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Part 1 of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, when Montag gets home after meeting Clarisse for the first time, he finds that his wife, Mildred, is lying motionless in bed. While the narration...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In the book's final scene, the men gather around a fire for warmth and cooking, as human beings have done for thousands of years. Though it is a significant departure from how fire is used earlier...

    Asked by user4960655 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    At the end of part two, Montag leaves Faber's house and travels home to find Mildred and her friends watching the parlor wall televisions. Montag, who is furious with society, attempts to shock the...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    The political actions that Montag and Faber engage in throughout the novel are defined as their numerous attempts to challenge the authoritative regime. In Part Two of the novel, Montag visits...

    Asked by user7863715 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    When Montag was a child, his cousin said that if he could fill a sieve with sand, he would get a dime. Of course, Montag failed to get the dime because this task is impossible. The sand will always...

    Asked by damianclayton2801 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    According to Faber, religion has changed significantly. Jesus, for example, has become part of the family on the parlor walls, and the Christian message has changed, too: He's a regular peppermint...

    Asked by damianclayton2801 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Ray Bradbury tends to use a lot of figurative language in his writing. Metaphor, simile, personification, hyperbole, and symbolism are all present in Fahrenheit 451. 1) Here is an example of a...

    Asked by user349383 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Diction: Diction refers to the deliberate choice of words and phrases in writing. What is interesting about Fahrenheit 451 is that it is set in the future. As a result, common words and phrases are...

    Asked by user349383 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Ray Bradbury's cautionary tale Fahrenheit 451, the author may introduce Clarisse before Montag's wife Mildred because the women are so different—more specifically, their differences are highly...

    Asked by roxannamontalvo on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Montag has books hidden in his ventilator grill at his house. Although he has not read any books before meeting Clarisse, his brief encounter with her causes him to be reminded of these books when...

    Asked by rockchris10 on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    This description comes from Part Three of the story when Montag is attacked by the Mechanical Hound: He felt all of the mingled relief and horror at having pulled back only in time to have just...

    Asked by mhouser on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Part Two, Montag visits Faber's home in hopes of gaining insight into how to comprehend the texts that he is reading. Throughout their conversation, Faber explains to Montag how and why society...

    Asked by litwitali on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    I am not sure if the question is asking for quotes that contain the word "power," or if the question is asking about quotes that show a theme/message of power in the book. There are not that many...

    Asked by jennifera10 on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451, there are a number of examples which demonstrate a conflict between Man and Society: Montag vs. the Majority: According to Beatty, it is the majority who first turned their...

    Asked by jtang0218 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Throughout Part Two: "The Sieve and the Sand," Bradbury provides a social commentary on the dystopian society through Montag's conversation with Faber and his experience with Mildred's friends....

    Asked by ssatish53 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451, Clarisse McClellan is utterly disinterested in technology. She explains this to Montag when they first meet: "I rarely watch the parlour walls or go to races or Fun Parks." For...

    Asked by evegomez on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    If you woke up one day to discover that the government and everyone in society were burning books, which ones would you save? Of course, most people would save their favorite books. However, for...

    Asked by user4930351 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    According to Beatty, burning books is a way to eliminate the possibility of strife, conflict, or unpleasant feelings. In his explanation to Montag and Mildred, he says that if any book causes any...

    Asked by christyneward on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Bradbury develops the theme of censorship by gradually introducing the ways in which society chose to neglect literature and the government's reasons for censoring intellectual thought. Initially,...

    Asked by emmafeds on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    At the beginning of Part Three, Beatty commands Montag to burn his home and gives him a flamethrower. After Montag torches his home, Beatty tells him that he is under arrest. Beatty then explains...

    Asked by user9631319 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Fahrenheit 451
    This is an interesting question because the majority of the conflicts are person vs. person or person vs. technology. One way to think about this is to consider Montag's human nature. He has been...

    Asked by nenesmartstuff12 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury makes reference to a lot of other books and authors. Here are a few examples: There is a reference to the Oxford Martyrs, Hugh Latimer and Nicholas Ridley, who were...

    Asked by tamiahart21 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Early in Part One of Fahrenheit 451, Montag meets Clarisse for the first time and comments that he always smells of kerosene. In fact, the smell lingers so strongly on Montag that even Mildred...

    Asked by user8918899 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Literature
    There are several characters throughout the novel that aid Montag in his search to find meaning in life and engage in intellectual pursuits. However, I feel that Faber is Montag's greatest ally...

    Asked by mastergod859 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    She is married to one of the firemen with whom Montag used to work. In Part Three of the novel, Montag kills Captain Beatty and becomes an enemy of the state. After barely escaping the Hound and...

    Asked by louser51 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451, Montag and Clarisse first meet late at night. In fact, it is around midnight ("midnight street") when Montag is coming home from his job at the fire station. For the past few...

    Asked by jndrake04 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451, Clarisse is different than most of her peers because of her unique way of thinking. Clarisse differentiates herself from other people because of the distinctive way she looks at...

    Asked by user445640 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    At the beginning of Part II, Montag calls Faber and asks him how many copies of the Bible are left in the country. Faber is startled at the question and responds by saying that he doesn't know....

    Asked by user7965745 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    In this scene, Montag says "how inconvenient" in response to some books falling on him as he ascends the stairwell to the lady's apartment. To put this into context, we need to look at the next...

    Asked by llutzel on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Fahrenheit 451
    Clarisse is Montag's affable neighbor who enjoys nature, conversations, and leisure time with her family. Clarisse's positive attitude and love for life make Montag aware of his own meaningless...

    Asked by user1380281 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Fahrenheit 451
    When Montag visits Faber at his apartment, he expresses his newfound belief that books might be the answer to his (and society's) miserable state. When Montag says this, Faber is quick to point out...

    Asked by daytonbelknap on via web

    1 educator answer

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