Questions and Answers for The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

You can download a modern English version of The Faerie Queene at Project Gutenberg at the link pasted below.If you'll give yourself a chance, you might find that Middle English, which is what...

Latest answer posted March 18, 2008 2:47 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

Many scholars recognize two dominant categories of allegory in Spenser's work: (1) moral and religious allegory; (2) historical and national allegory. "Political" is a term that might be...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2012 9:47 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

This question links "painter-poet" to Edmund Spenser, basically asking if Spenser is adept at using imagery—for a painter-poet would be best suited to write in such a way that his descriptions...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2012 12:21 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

(continued from previous post) Now, Everyman does not have the pleasure of being shown the future or his place in the New Jerusalem. Everyman has to accept that on faith, though he is not alone in...

Latest answer posted February 6, 2011 6:06 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

The Spenserian Stanza consists of nine lines (eight lines of iambic pentameter followed by a single alexandrine) and a rhyme scheme of abbabbcbcc. As seen in the opening stanza of The Faerie Queen,...

Latest answer posted June 7, 2012 12:10 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

The most significant woman mentioned is Gloriana, the Faerie Queene herself. Gloriana is a thinly veiled stand-in for Queen Elizabeth I. She is presented as powerful and beautiful—or at least, the...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2019 10:30 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

When Edmund Spenser wrote The Faerie Queene, he faced an enormous challenge. He wrote in the language of Geoffrey Chaucer, as a compliment not only to this other author, but also to the era of...

Latest answer posted August 2, 2012 11:26 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

As a conceit can be defined as an elaborate metaphor, and Spenser claimed "dark conceit" to be a synonym of "continued allegory," he uses the term to define the nature of his book as an allegory....

Latest answer posted February 17, 2019 4:07 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

In Book I, stanza 36 specifically refers to sleep. "The sad humour loading the eye liddes" (The Literature of Renaissance England 179) does not mean that Red Cross and the Lady are sad or weeping,...

Latest answer posted January 27, 2009 11:12 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

Edmund Spenser's epic poem, The Faerie Queene, is largely a symbolic tale, dedicated to Elizabeth I. Spenser needed a patron to provide for his support while he worked, and patrons expect that the...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2011 11:17 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

The subject matter of the epic poem The Faerie Queen, by Edmund Spenser, stems largely from Arthurian legends, so we can take some of our cues from there when we look for insight into what...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2018 1:47 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

Edmund Spenser lived during a period when England had finally emerged from a long period of internal wars, religious transformation, and uncertainties about the legitimate monarchy that would...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2018 4:10 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

Like most great poems, Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene is less important for its meaning than for its artistry. One key aspect of the artistry of any poem involves the poem’s sound effects and...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2011 6:07 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

In the epic tale 'The Faerie Queene' by Edmund Spenser the knight in the story gets the name 'Redcross' gets his name from a cross the colour of blood painted onto his shield. Redcross has been...

Latest answer posted November 7, 2013 10:23 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

George Armstrong Wauchope, Ph.D. of South Carolina College explains in his introductory remarks to Book I of Spenser's text in Gutenberg Project that Book II is an allegory about "man's...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2011 12:31 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

The Red Cross Knight's dream in Canto I, XLVI-LV, is unusual in that it is the deliberate handicraft of Morpheus, requested by the Knight's enemy, Archimago, and delivered to the Knight by the...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2012 1:05 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

"Old father Nilus" refers to the Nile River in Egypt (Aegyptus). The river floods every year and deposits rich soil on the land ("the fertile slime outwell). Likewise, when the...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2007 12:49 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

In book I, canto I, stanza XVII of The Faerie Queene, the knight Redcrosse has just entered the den of the monster, Error. Although this is not his quest, and he has stumbled upon the monster by...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2020 11:12 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

In this episode, Redcrosse is sent a dream of Duessa, who appears in the likeness of Una. Unlike Una, however, Duessa is schooled in the arts of illusion, and seeks with 'false shewes [to] abuse...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2008 5:40 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

The first step in writing about Spenser's dark conceit is to define it. This may be a harder task than it seems. Spenser appears the originator, or the first user in print, of the term "dark...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2012 7:21 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

There are many religious details and references connected specifically with the description of Red Crosse's attire in this section. He bares the cross of his Lord upon his breast and on his shield,...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2009 2:50 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

Here is a good site to use for this: http://wandership.ca/projects/eow/

Latest answer posted August 19, 2008 10:33 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

There are many examples of the blending of classical/"pagan" literary and cultural references with Christian/Biblical ones in The Faerie Queene, particularly in Book I. In fact this book is often...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2015 10:17 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

Despite its name, the Bower of Bliss is not actually blissful. On the contrary, it's a place of evil, of strange enchantment, presided over by a wicked witch called Acrasia. Her name comes from a...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2020 9:35 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

The dominant Protestant theme in Book I is Holiness. Spenser's allegory is threefold: moral, religious, and personal. Critics agree, as represented by George Wauchope, Ph.D. in the 1921...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2012 12:34 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

Book I of the Faerie Queentakes the reader on the epic adventures of the Red Crosse Knight. Spenser once said of this knight the following: "The first of the knight of the Redcrosse, in whome I...

Latest answer posted May 9, 2012 9:22 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

The eNotes "Character" section on Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene defines exactly what each character represents. The Red Cross Knight (or Redcrosse) represents Saint George and "the Christian...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2013 12:29 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

If you can follow the action, amid all of Spenser's poetic and archaic language, the adventures of Red Cross and Una are exciting. While so much of the poem is an allegory (that is, a character,...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2009 3:36 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

Edmund Spenser began his career as a poet in imitation of Virgil. In 1579, he published the Shepheardes Calendar, a collection of pastoral poems emulating Virgil's Eclogues. In his masterpiece, the...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2019 12:46 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

One of the most significant depictions of physical suffering in The Faerie Queene is accompanied by a narrative promoting healing. The character of Aescalpius is compelled to help suffering people...

Latest answer posted February 29, 2020 11:50 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

Spenserian temperance is based on the assumption that man is destined to become perfect. The Christian principles he uses lead him to believe that perfection of man is as inevitable as the...

Latest answer posted October 20, 2007 1:13 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

One color that appears in the first book of Edmund Spenser’s epic poem The Faerie Queene is white. White is attached to the “lovely Ladie” riding alongside the knight. White might symbolize the...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2021 5:57 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

The poetic means that English poet Edmund Spenser uses in Book III of “The Faerie Queene” to represent “a version” of love include the following: Use of Theme Spenser use the theme of Chastity or...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2015 7:20 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

It seems that Spenser is not necessarily trying to redeem women in this chapter, or even defend them. Instead, he is encouraging a specific type of femininity. Specifically, he celebrates chaste...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2019 3:08 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

For me it is definitely the allegorical nature of the poem. Nobody did allegory like Spenser, with every character representing something else, and almost every action or plot twist having a...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2009 8:27 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

I would have to say that the answer to your question will vary from reader to reader. Many may find the text to imaginative and superficial. Others, like myself, love the imagery he provides.

Latest answer posted September 2, 2011 9:13 am UTC

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The Faerie Queene

Edmund Spenser, a 16th century English poet, published the first three books of The Faerie Queen in 1590. From the onset, this work was a profound tribute to the Queen of England, the nation...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2018 10:30 pm UTC

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The Faerie Queene

Britomart's decision to become a knight is linked to her love of Artegall, a noble knight she first sees in an enchanted mirror. A pure and virtuous young woman unaccustomed to love, Britomart is...

Latest answer posted March 2, 2021 12:09 pm UTC

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