Elizabeth Barrett Browning Questions and Answers

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

In this poem, the speaker expresses all of the myriad ways that she loves her beloved, to whom she speaks (this is a device called apostrophe: when the speaker addresses someone who is absent or...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2019 10:35 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Browning was being courted by her future husband Robert Browning (also a famous poet) when she wrote this poem. The tone of the poem reminds me of teenagers in love. More than just...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2011 4:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

This is one of Browning's famous love sonnets that celebrates and extols the love that the speaker has with her beloved. The poem is built around a central image of the two souls of the speaker and...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2011 8:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The application of Barrett's sonnet can take many forms. The strongest level of application probably lies in the idea of Barrett speaking to her husband, indicating a type of spiritual, but mortal...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2009 8:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barett Browning's Sonnet XXIX is a powerful statement about love and the expression of it in the absence of another. The opening lines of the poem establish that the speaker is...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2009 11:07 am UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Clearly, Elizabeth Barrett Browning is writing about love. But we sell her poem short if we see this only as an enumeration of the many facets of love. This is actually a very personal statement...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2016 3:59 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

I would submit that the tone of love and emotional intimacy is set from the opening line. One of the most recognized lines in literature, Browning's opening helps to convey the tone of emotional...

Latest answer posted December 19, 2009 9:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barret Browning's thirteen-stanza poem was published in 1843 to publicize the plight of child labor used in factories and coal mines. It uses sentiment—raising emotions in the reader—to...

Latest answer posted November 28, 2019 3:47 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The two poems written in honor of George Sands (Amantine-Lucile-Aurore Dupin) openly question the gender binary norms of the 19th century, while "Sonnets from the Portuguese" uses subtler means to...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2017 7:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Unfortunately, because you asked multiple questions, I have been forced to abide by enotes regulations and edit your question down to just one. Please remember that it is not permitted to ask more...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2010 7:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Both poems are Italian (Petrarchan) sonnets and divide into an octet (eight-line section) followed by a sestet (six-line section). Both octets use the rhyme scheme abbaabba. Both sestets use the...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2019 3:22 am UTC

4 educator answers

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Well, let's see, your question is basically referring to historical context here. Elizabeth Barrett Browning is usually found in "The Victorian Age" unit of any British Literature text. Quite...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2011 11:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Browning uses many different aspects of figurative language in "Sonnet 43," outside of the more typically used ones. First, she uses apostrophe. Apostrophe is where a poet evokes...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2018 9:22 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

A figure of speech is a phrase which describes something in a figurative, or non-literal, way. Metaphors and similes are the most common types of figures of speech. In "How Do I Love Thee?" by...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2019 6:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The speaker's thoughts, in this complex poem, on the flowers given her by her beloved are clouded by the Shakespearean style play on words that follows after the lines about the flowers: "Take...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2011 4:38 am UTC

2 educator answers

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

One thing to consider about this poem is that the narrator is looking back to the past. In the past, the flowers have been pleasing and emotionally fulfilling as was the love affair. The flowers,...

Latest answer posted December 28, 2010 9:55 am UTC

4 educator answers

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Every part of a poem is highly significant, because every part has the density of meaning that qualifies it as poetry in the first place. Each part of a poem is necessary to the coherency of the...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2016 8:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The narrator of this poem is trying to protect young children from being abused as young workers in industrial England. Her last stanza is a plea for the government to reform working conditions for...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2011 8:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Browning here is speaking of transcending the physical distance between her and her lover. He may be taken from her physically, but she nonetheless experiences his presence as real and comforting....

Latest answer posted October 18, 2016 4:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

That depends. The poem, though very short, equivocates from beginning to end. It begins with an exclamation that confesses obsession: "I think of thee!" Barrett imagines her lover as a tree. Her...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2016 5:58 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

This poem seems to be a statement between a lover and her beloved. However, much in the poem might remind a reader of the type of imagery Donne uses in his Holy Sonnets, such as "Batter My Heart,...

Latest answer posted January 17, 2019 4:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

What an odd rhyme scheme: ABBA ABBA CXXXCX. This was unusual in the mid-19th century, particularly for a poet of Browning's calibre. Anyhow...She's talking about shutting out the pains and worries...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2015 6:13 am UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Barrett Browning was an English poet who lived from 1806-1861; she was thus a Victorian poet since she lived in England during the Victorian Era. This era is defined by the reign of Queen Victoria...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2010 4:37 am UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

"The Cry of the Children" by Eliabeth Barrett Browning is about the working conditions of children in England around the turn of the Century between the mid 1800's up through the very early 1900s....

Latest answer posted June 21, 2009 11:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

In this sonnet, Elizabeth Barrett Browning states that the "when" of her loving her beloved, Robert Browning, is day and night, or all the time: "By sun and candle-light." The "where" of her loving...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2021 5:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The main comparison being made in this sonnet is the flowers that the speaker of the poem has received from her beloved which are compared to the gift that she offers him in return: her verse. This...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2010 3:49 am UTC

3 educator answers

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

In the first line of "How Do I Love Thee?" the poet poses a question, to which there might be a great many answers. Several of these possible answers are given during the course of the sonnet, but...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2021 12:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Browning was born on 6 March 1806 in County Durham, England and died on 29 June 1861 in Florence, Italy. She began writing poems as a very young child, and her mother assiduously...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2015 5:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

In response to the many gifts of beautiful flowers that the speaker of the poem has received from her beloved, which all act as symbols or tokens of the love that he has for her, she gives a gift...

Latest answer posted December 25, 2010 7:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The entire poem is a metaphor for how Elizabeth thinks that while we are here on earth, we can be strong, work hard, do good things, and yet pursue something that we truly enjoy, to live for some...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2009 7:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The woman singeth at her spinning-wheelA pleasant chant, ballad or barcarole;She thinketh of her song, upon the whole,Far more than of her flax; and yet the reelIs full, and artfully her fingers...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2008 6:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Well, in this poem of love and adoration there are many different images that we are provided with, each memorable in its own way, as the speaker in the poem accepts the gift of carefully tended...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2010 7:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

It is clear that the speaker in this sonnet is happy to receive the flowers that her "Beloved" has worked incredibly hard to pick these flowers throughout the entire year, and has made sure that...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2010 7:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

I don't agree with #3. I think if you look carefully at the sonnet, you can see that the comparison is made between the flowers the speaker receives and the love that the speaker has, but the...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2010 3:51 am UTC

2 educator answers

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

She is telling her beloved that he should take her love and cherish it. She is telling him that he should take the flowers from her flower bed and put them somewhere where they will not get...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2010 1:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Her (the speaker, Elizabeth’s) lover’s flowers are literally flowers, but also symbols of love; of course. When she says, ‘take back these’ thoughts, the thoughts refer to the poem itself. So,...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2010 6:46 am UTC

1 educator answer