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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Patroclus is Achilles's friend. Achilles holds him in very high esteem; Edith Hamilton notes that Patroclus "of all men on earth was dearest to [Achilles]." To settle a debt, Agamemnon takes from...

    Asked by enotes on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    A Harvard Outline is just the basic way of taking notes on readings. It has main ideas, sub ideas, sub-sub ideas, etc. Here is a more visual representation: Title (Subject) I. Main Idea (Main...

    Asked by alecrodriguez314 on via web

  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    The Greeks knew that they could not win unless they took their enemies by surprise within Troy itself. Odysseus, ever cunning, devised a plan: he had a worker craft a large wooden horse with a...

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    1 educator answer.

  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    The word "panic" is derived from the Greek god Pan (Πάν). Pan was a rustic god, and the center of his cult was in the region of Arcadia. He was associated with wild beasts, hunting, and...

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    I would suggest that one dominant moral from the tale of Pyramus and Thisbe would be that adults should not transfer their bitterness to children. Pyramus and Thisbe are victims of their parents'...

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Phaeton asked his father, the Sun God, if he could control the sun chariot. When Phaeton sought out him out, the Sun God said that he would grant his son any wish his heart desired. With that,...

    Asked by rtash5 on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    In Edith Hamilton's Mythology, Chapter I entitled "The Gods," is divided into The Gods and The Lesser Gods. Unlike other races, the Greeks believed that the heavens and earth were formed before the...

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Hamilton depicts different kinds of love in Greek mythology. In each of these cases, sacrifice becomes a critical element of love. This sacrifice motivates the characters to love and endure the...

    Asked by katiejov on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Hamilton's depiction of Greek Mythology features a complex understanding of revenge as justice. Revenge in mythology comes out of a character having experienced an egregious wrongdoing....

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Hamilton shows that mortals are always subject to a fated condition that is larger than individual free will. Hamilton's collection of myths shows that mortals who suffer when they believe their...

    Asked by katiejov on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    This is a lot of question. I don't have the space in this format to address each item completely, but I'll do what I can in the space allowed. Hercules, one of the heroes written about in Edith...

    Asked by katiejov on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    At the beginning of the story "The Two Great Gods of Earth," which concerns Demeter and Dionysus, Edith Hamilton argues that humans are better off without the gods' interference. She begins by...

    Asked by user5723345 on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Edith Hamilton's theory can best be summed up thusly: Earth was the solid ground, and yet vaguely a personality, too. Heaven was the blue vault on high, but it acted in some ways as a human being...

    Asked by lizveal on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    By and large, Hamilton is not necessarily concerned with Greek myths as windows to Greek culture, and she believes that many of the Roman writers who translated Greek myths did not take them...

    Asked by mhcarroll on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    I think that it is a challenge to find exact quotes from myths because the translation and recitation of myths always changes. It is this human quality to them where their thematic application...

    Asked by hellobook on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    I think that exact quotes in any retelling of a myth are challenging because translations always vary. It is important to keep this in mind in understanding how to pull details from myths. I do...

    Asked by hellobook on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    The primary theme that emerges from the myth is the redemptive power of faith. Baucis and Philemon honor their guests, having faith in the understanding that there is something fundamentally...

    Asked by helloessay on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    This question refers to Orestes, the son of Agamemon and Clytemnestra. After Agamemnon returned home from the Trojan War, Clytemnestra (aided by her lover Aegisthus) killed Agamemnon. Later,...

    Asked by elolpz on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    One thing we need to keep in mind about the term hero is the difference between literary heroes and our modern day notion of what makes a hero. In our modern world, we think of a hero as someone...

    Asked by elolpz on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Sinon was a Greek warrior and the son of King Sisyphus (who was forced to roll a boulder uphill only to watch it roll back down, thus repeating the procedure forever). By pretending to desert the...

    Asked by atatum1 on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    For the goddess Ate (pronounced "Ah-tay"), I would look early on in the book where she discusses the early origins of the world and the gods. You might also consider checking the index in the back...

    Asked by ortizg224 on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    If you have not studied Greek mythology at all, I can see where it would be extremely difficult to understand the many allusions that poets, Shakespeare, and other well-known authors make to...

    Asked by mahmoud-s on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    You can read the story in full in the work, Golden Ass. Psyche did not want to leave her family to meet her new husband (Cupid). This is reasonable, because she was very close to her immediate...

    Asked by ericawhit1996 on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    You might be shooting for quite a bit here. I would propose a bit more clarification offered. If I understand correctly, you are analyzing the history of Greek Mythology Heroes, any potential...

    Asked by ellebelle on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Most of the modern-day names and terms associated with Hephaestus are related to his Roman counterpart--Vulcan. Here are several examples: Vulcan Equipment--a company which specializes in...

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    I'm assuming you're talking about the place in Fiji that comes up on Google... It doesn't say that it is named after Poseidon, but it surely must be. The way you can tell that is that A) it's an...

    Asked by isabellaz1002 on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    This is fairly interesting. The florist FTD uses the symbol of Hermes, the god of messengers, to imply their ability to delivery quickly. The winged and fleeted feet is also a symbol of FTD....

    Asked by fzk10624 on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    According to Greek mythology, the world was created out of nothingness -- out of chaos. The goddess Eurynome then had a child, Eros, the god of love with either a giant serpent or with the north...

    Asked by inuyasha123 on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Th story of Europa and the Bull is a story best known from Greek mythology in which Zeus, king of the gods, plans to seduce Europa. To do so he turns into a tame white bull. She comes close to him...

    Asked by tab7 on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    The myth of Europa is the story of how Zeus, king of the gods, kidnaps and seduces Europa. To do this he turns himself into a tame white bull to encourage her to come close. She pets him, then...

    Asked by tab7 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Erebus (aka Erobos), the son of Chaos, was the primeval god of darkness. His sister-wife was Nyx (aka Night), also born of Chaos, who cast mists throughout the heavens and the earth to create...

    Asked by alexlovesdogs on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    1. food from its fruit and shelter for its creature. 2. in the classical mythology Dionysus is the god of wine, the inspirer of ritual madness and ecstasy, and a major figure of Greek mythology,...

    Asked by deejayess on via web

  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    There can be many explanations being offered through this myth. The first would be how beauty and the goddess of beauty entered the world. Arising from the sea and the domains of Poseidon, the...

    Asked by jaybaybay on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Loki's evolution to become more of the Devil reflects the influence of Christian mythology on Norse. Nonetheless, the majority of Loki's stories have to do with him being an outcast and a...

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Pentheus was the king of Thebes. When he took the throne, he banned the worship of Dionysus, the god of wine and revelry. In doing this, Pentheus incited the anger of the Bacchae, the women who...

    Asked by jenni99991 on via web

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  • Edith Hamilton's Mythology
    Different traditions exist regarding what happened to Helen after the Trojan War. If we read Homer's Odyssey, in particular Book 4, we find that Helen has returned to Sparta with her first husband,...

    Asked by chulada on via web

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