Questions and Answers for The Edible Woman

The Edible Woman

Discuss the role that Duncan plays in The Edible Woman.

Authors who write fiction, drama, and poetry may make use of a "foil," which is a literary device employed to compare and contrast one thing to another. In this case, Duncan is a foil—most likely...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2021 1:21 pm UTC

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The Edible Woman

In "The Edible Woman," how does food play a role in developing relationships?

In the story "The Edible Woman" food represents Marian's self. Therefore, every instance that requires her to interact with people is a direct symbol of how society, the moment, or the future may...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2010 11:27 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What are the themes of The Edible Woman?  

The Edible Woman is a novel by Margaret Atwood first published in 1969. Atwood herself describes it as a "proto-feminist" novel. Although it is less fully realized in its treatment of gender...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2019 11:16 pm UTC

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The Edible Woman

Can someone please explain the ending of The Edible Woman to me?

The ending of the novel may seem dramatic and a bit weird, but it is actually quite simple: Marian is so extremely fed up with her situation at work, at home, in her relationship, with Peter, with...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2010 6:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

Is there any use of allegory in The Edible Woman?

I personally do not think there is any use of allegory in this story. Let us remember that allegories are stories where almost every character, action and event stands for both itself and some...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2011 7:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In "The Edible Woman", why doesn't Marian like to eat? How does Marian rebel against society through the food?

In Margaret Atwood's The Edible Woman, the main character Marian becomes unable to eat after she gets engaged to her boyfriend Peter. She had thought that their relationship was casual, as Peter...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2010 1:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What is the climax in the book The Edible Woman ?

The climax is defined as the section of the plot which represents the part of the story which is the most emotionally engaging after the rising action has raised the tension of the story to fever...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2012 2:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In "The Edible Woman", how does Marian relate to the world through food? Explain the reasons.

Marian, the main character in The Edible Woman, is a modern, progressive young woman in the 1970s, living with a roommate and holding down a job, while having a casual relationship with her...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2010 2:07 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

How do I write an thesis statement on the themes of The Edible Woman? 

Both the historical and philosophical context of "The Edible Woman" denote the struggle for self-acceptance and the eternal quest for who you really are. Marian's role as a woman has been...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2010 10:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In The Edible Woman how does Marian describe the connection between food and family, friends or community?

In The Edible Woman Marian makes connections with food as a way to bond with society and with her boyfriend. Similarly, food is the essence of her job, since she has to prepare questionnaires for...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2010 1:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In "The Edible Woman," Peter says to Marian "women are so much better at arranging on plate." What aspects of food ...

For Peter,Marian is a character that has to fit herself to his storyline. She has to act perfectly, with lots of femininity, and in a certain and specific way that does not ruin his own vision of...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2010 2:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In "The Edible Woman," Marian's refusal to eat is seen as "rebelling against the system." Does Marian's rebellion...

Marian has a problem with her identity in that Peter is taking it away from her. She has let him suck her dry, although he complaints that such is what women do to men. However, in making her act,...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2010 5:09 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

Examine Atwood's prose style, paying special attention to language as an element of narration in The Edible Woman.

Though some might regard this as a negative criticism (which it's not intended to be), Atwood's language in The Edible Woman might often be called "unremarkable." For the most part, she gives us a...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2020 5:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In "The Edible Woman," Marian has dinner with Duncan's roommates and she does not eat a variety of things. What are...

Marian's dinner companions were likely to not have cared except for the curiosity of it all. The conversation regarding Alice in Wonderland seemed to be the fixed topic that drove everyone's...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2010 10:26 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In The Edible Woman and Chocolat, what is the role that food plays in developing relationships?

In Vienne's world, she had always belonged to a family which tightens bonds among people using food, particularly chocolate. In Chocolate the town is unified, freed, and even lightened up thanks to...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2010 12:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In "The Edible Woman," what are Peter's and Marian's different understandings of the heart-shaped cake? What does it...

In Margaret Atwood's The Edible Woman, the main character, Marian, becomes engaged to Peter, and, as a result, slowly becomes unable to eat any more. Food becomes disgusting to her, and she isn't...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2010 9:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What's the significance of the cake baking episode in The Edible Woman?

By baking a woman-shaped cake and presenting it to her fiancé, Marian reveals her insights into the institution of marriage and, more broadly, into male–female relations in a patriarchal society....

Latest answer posted January 14, 2020 9:27 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What is the main theme and feministic approaches?

The central theme of The Edible Woman is the consumption of the self and the lost of one's independence by the expectations of society. Marian is a progressive and independent woman who has found...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2010 11:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What is the meaning of the pronoun shifts in the three parts of The Edible Woman?

The pronoun shifts signify change in point of view, and also illustrate Marian's vascillating relation with reality and self.In the first section, the pronouns are in the first person. Marian is...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2007 4:03 pm UTC

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The Edible Woman

Is there a common theme shared among the novels Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel, The Edible Woman by...

Undeniably, the common theme that these novels share is the search for self-identity in a male-dominated society, where the woman is relegated to specific and limiting roles: those of nurturers,...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2012 5:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

How can I compare/contrast The Edible Woman with The Great Gatsby or Hamlet through a feminist lens? (I need a...

While The Edible Woman has a female protagonist, it shares with The Great Gatsby and Hamlet (which both have male protagonists) a fundamental concern with issues of identity and authenticity....

Latest answer posted July 21, 2019 10:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In "The Edible Woman" Duncan eats pumpkin seeds in the movie theatre, which Marian thinks are "like some primitive...

I'm not really sure what you are needing here, as this is not a question, but I will take a stab at it. In the chapter of The Edible Woman to which you are referring, Marian has gone to a movie...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2010 10:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What are some of Atwood's strategies of developing various versions or archetypes of womanhood? How does this...

Margaret Atwood situates Marian, who is approaching marriage, among two female friends, Clara and Ainsley, who are at different points in their lives. Clara represents the most traditional female...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2019 4:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

Examine The Edible Woman as a female bildungsroman.

A bildungsroman is usually a coming-of-age story, in which the protagonist progresses toward maturity. The main character is sometimes introduced as a child and ages over the years. This type of...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2020 6:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What are the similiarities  between Chocolat and The Edible Woman?

I think the most obvious similarity between these two books is the constant references toward food. Reading either is a lot like watching an episode of "Sex in the City." The viewer/reader is...

Latest answer posted July 23, 2010 11:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In "The Edible Women" What do Peter's and Marian's different understandings of the heart-shaped cake (chapter...

Marian got that cake for Peter knowing deep inside it was more of an obligation as a girlfriend than out of genuine love for him. The cake is totally cliche: Pink, heart shaped, cute, and "probably...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2010 1:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What does Marian achieve through cooking?

In Margaret Atwood's The Edible Woman, the main character, Marian becomes slowly unable to eat after she gets engaged to her long-time boyfried Peter. First, she can't eat meat. For a while, she...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2010 11:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

How is she interacting with Peter through baking cake?

Assuming that your question is what message she is trying to convey onto Peter, the answer is that she is sending him signals that she is scared of being overpowered and consumed by Peter's...

Latest answer posted August 9, 2010 2:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

Compare The Edible Woman and Chocolat for the female protagonists' ways of cooking and what they achieve by it.

Vienne's purpose with cooking, and her goal of crafting the perfect food for people are to unite society, to blend in, and to be accepted. She also does it out of a natural feeling of nurturing and...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2010 11:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In The Edible Woman what are the arguments (points) about how Marian relate to the world through the food?

Her inner arguments began with her visualization of meat as an edible object that reminded her how animals have to be shot in their heads, and then lose it, in order to be consumed by the world....

Latest answer posted August 7, 2010 7:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

How is The Edible Woman an anti-comedy? What are some examples and meaning? What could be the thesis?

In an interview published in 1977 in the Malahat Review, Margaret Atwood described The Edible Woman as an anti-comedy, elaborating: In traditional comedy, boy meets girl, there are complications,...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2019 3:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What are the recurrent motifs Atwood uses?

The persistent motifs in Edible Woman include: Anxiety over commitment- Marian's eating disorder began after her boyfriend Peter proposed to her. This left her to believe that whatever was going to...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2010 3:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What's the significance of Len's character in The Edible Woman?

In Margaret Atwood’s novel, Leonard (Len) Slank is important as a counterpart to Ainsley Tewce. This young man and young woman represent the hypocrisy of people of both genders in their attitudes...

Latest answer posted January 14, 2020 10:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In "The Edible Women" why does Marian reject the beauty ideal that the red dress stands for?

The reason why Marian rejects the beauty ideal that the red dress stands for is because she absolutely hates the role of women in society, namely, her own, in a monogamous relationship. She is a...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2010 11:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What is the role played by The Lady Down Below in The Edible Woman?

The general consensus among scholars is that The Lady Down Below is an allegorical figure representing traditional female values. The Lady Down Below, Marian and Ainsley's landlady, is deeply...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2020 10:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In The Edible Woman, when Marian saw Carla and her babies, what did she think about that scene?

It was a very sad scene: Clara, swollen and depressed was again pregnant while her house was in shambles. The heat was disheartening, the grass was high, the kids were everywhere. Diapers...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2010 11:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In The Edible Woman how does the protagonist influence social and cultural norms and how is she affected by...

Marian influences social and cultural norms in that she questions the very meaning of existing as a woman in a society of double standards. She introspectively disagrees with the role of Clara as a...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2010 11:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

How is this book similar to our present day lives?

The themes in the story are very present today. Women have always been given a role to play in society: That of mothers, wives, nurturers. Yet, women have throughout the years fought those pre-set...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2010 3:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What is the theme of this novel based on Marian's relation to food?  

The main idea, or main theme, of Margaret Atwood's novel The Edible Woman is that social expectations are seldom in tandem with our freedom of choice. As a result, the clash between what we want to...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2012 1:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What are the differences between "Chocolat" and "The Edible Women"?

Aside from the major differences in characters and plot - I think what you need to examine most here is the difference in the feelings and emotions related to food in each novel. The protagonist in...

Latest answer posted July 23, 2010 11:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In The Edible Woman,Marian brings frozen food at Peter's apartment. How does she use cooking to interact with Peter...

There are several instances in the story where food and cooking are used as triggers of communication and social connections. Since Marian finds it very hard to connect with Peter (but is expected...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2010 1:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

What is the importance of the different landscapes throughout the book?

The Edible Woman takes place in a variety of locations, many of which are stifling to Marian in some way, and none of which truly belong to her. Marian's apartment on the top floor of the house is...

Latest answer posted September 29, 2019 11:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

Would you regard Ainsley's 'pregnancy project' as a success? Please explain with close reference to the text.

The character of Ainsley Tewce in The Edible Woman has numerous internal conflicts. She greatly values the idea of independence, as befitting her feminist politics, but she also wants to be a...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2020 7:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

How does Margaret Atwood offer no hope and create an inevitable fall from innocence which continues to spiral...

Marian was undergoing a massive and very intense inner change. She was no longer acting in accordance to what she had decided to be the journey of her life. She was now a walking and talking...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2010 3:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Edible Woman

In "The Edible Women" After reading the instructions for cooking turtles, Marian compares it to the"early Christian...

My understanding of your question is to specify how cooking turtles reminded Marian about early Chritian martyrs. If that is your question, then the answer would be because the process of catching...

Latest answer posted July 4, 2010 7:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer