Dust Tracks on a Road

by Zora Neale Hurston
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Dust Tracks on a Road Questions and Answers

Dust Tracks on a Road

I think that Hurston would argue that her own experience of "licking the pots in Sorrow's Kitchen" would have come from personal pain and social ostracizing. These could be seen as universal to...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2012, 7:05 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

More specifically, the quote comes from the personal essay "How It Feels to be Colored Me." Hurston makes the comment in the context of other writers' attitudes toward their blackness at the time...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2018, 5:42 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

In chapter 4, two young ladies visit Zora's school. Unusually, the two visitors don't give any warning that they are coming but rather show up unannounced. When the two ladies come to Zora's class...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2019, 6:17 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

One afternoon two young ladies visit Zora's school to listen to the students read. The ladies are so impressed by Zora's reading that they decide to invite her to the hotel they are staying at, and...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2019, 10:29 am (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

The phrase "dust tracks on a road" refers to Zora Neale Hurston's desire to travel and wander away from home. In chapter 3, "I Get Born," Hurston explains that she didn't take to walking as quickly...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2020, 5:17 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

In Chapter 4, Hurston recalls that "two young ladies just popped in" one afternoon when she was at school. She says that white people would often bring their friends, "who came down from the...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2019, 12:49 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

In chapter 4, Hurston recalls the moment when, as a young girl, she was given a box full of books by two ladies. She says that the book which had the biggest impact on her was the book about Norse...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2019, 12:35 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

As Zora herself describes it, she'd often sit on top of the gatepost and watch the world go by. From her unique vantage point, Zora sees numerous carriages and cars pass by the house. As one of...

Latest answer posted October 1, 2018, 9:10 am (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

One day, two white women from Minnesota turn up at Zora's school. They're brought to her class, where Zora, as one of the best students, is chosen to read to them. Suitably impressed, the ladies...

Latest answer posted October 6, 2019, 4:27 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

Zora Neale Hurston grew up in the Deep South during the Jim Crow-era laws, including segregation. Fortunately for Hurston, she grew up in Eatonville, Florida, while not the first black community in...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2015, 5:50 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

In the autobiography Dust Tracks on a Road, author and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston describes growing up as a black American in the early twentieth century. One encounter she describes is when...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2019, 3:15 am (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

Chapter 6 of Dust Tracks on a Road marks an important early turning point in Zora Neale Hurston’s life. When her mother dies, Zora’s world is turned upside down. She not only loses her mother but...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2020, 5:08 am (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

Zora presents a generally positive portrait of her home town of Eatonville. It's quite an idyllic place for a small child growing up, a safe and secure place where the all-black population is to...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2019, 11:19 am (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

She treasures them because they helped set her on the road to becoming a writer. When she was a little girl, Hurston was visited in class by a couple of young white ladies from Minnesota. Along...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2019, 11:16 am (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

When Hurston first learns how to read, the Bible is one of the first books that she discovers. The Bible's universality provided the necessary appeal for the emerging reader and thinker: I came...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2014, 11:30 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

The visit of the two white women from Minnesota is important for Zora as it kindles a love of reading in the young girl, one that will inspire her to be a writer. The ladies are clearly impressed...

Latest answer posted December 9, 2018, 6:48 am (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

Zora Neale Hurston's autobiography, Dust Tracks on a Road, is written, for the most part, in an upbeat, optimistic style, which is also the tone of most of her personal essays. It often reads like...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2019, 10:20 am (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

This sentence actually occurs in the fifth paragraph of chapter 4. In this chapter, the author is describing her childhood, and specifically the notion (not uncommon to children) that the world...

Latest answer posted August 2, 2019, 3:47 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

When she reads aloud in class, the young Zora Neale Thurston displays confidence, fearlessness, and joy. In the book, Zora relates that Caucasian visitors often dropped in on her African-American...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2018, 10:44 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

Zora Neale Hurston shows that the two women made an impression on her because she dedicates an entire chapter of Dust Tracks on a Road to them. The chapter is called "Two Women in Particular."...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2019, 7:55 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

Keep in mind that Lucy Ann Potts is Zora Neale Hurston's mother, so her inspiration is pivotal in Dust Tracks on a Road. In reality, the character of Lucy Ann Potts reverberates throughout Zora's...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2015, 6:36 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

After reading so well in front of her teacher and the two ladies who have come to visit the school, Zora waits to be spoken to. She notices that the ladies "glanced (her) way once or twice," and...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2019, 2:21 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

In chapter 4 of her autobiography, Dust Tracks on a Road, Zora Neale Hurston relates how she read out the story of Pluto and Persephone in her fifth-grade reading class. In doing so, she saved face...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2021, 5:38 pm (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

(Note: I'm assuming this question pertains to the excerpt from Dust Tracks on a Road in the Prentice Hall American literature book, which covers the second half of Chapter 4, "The Inside Search,"...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2016, 8:07 am (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

I think that one particular way that Hurston's view on herself and the world around her enhanced her work as a writer is that she presents a complex view about racial identity. One reason why...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2013, 10:20 am (UTC)

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Dust Tracks on a Road

One day, a couple of white women from Minnesota pay a visit to Zora's school. While there, they are treated to readings from Zora and some other children in class. Zora is one of the best readers...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2020, 11:16 am (UTC)

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