Dusk Questions and Answers

Dusk

In "Dusk," the main character Gortsby was sitting in Hyde Park of London. It was about 6:30 in the evening, right before dark. Gortsby's philosophy was that those who are defeated come out at dusk,...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2012, 8:54 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

In Saki's short story "Dusk," the narrator details the fact that "Dusk, to his mind, was the hour of the defeated." By stating this, one can assume that those who come out at dusk are those who are...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2011, 2:17 am (UTC)

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Dusk

In his story "Dusk," author Saki employs light/dark imagery to create a certain mystery in his narrative; in addition, his skillful utilization of irony and satire enhances the startling effect of...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2011, 2:59 am (UTC)

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Dusk

To understand what the author is saying, go a little past the line that you mention. There, you will see him explain the meaning of this line. What the author is saying is that dusk is a time when...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2010, 1:19 am (UTC)

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Dusk

The title of Saki's short story "Dusk" can be looked at as appropriate to the movement and setting of the story. Given that the story takes place at six o'clock on a March night, light is fleeting....

Latest answer posted November 4, 2011, 7:47 am (UTC)

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Dusk

The setting for Saki's story, "Dusk" is London at Hyde Park Corner where there is a park that is bound by bushes and fence against the busy noise of traffic and blazing city lights with the...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2010, 5:30 am (UTC)

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Dusk

In the story "Dusk," the young man is a fraud. He tells a very deceptive story about how he has lost his way back to his hotel. When he sits down on the park bench, he has one goal in mind. He is...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2012, 7:31 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

In the story "Dusk," Gortsby is sitting on a park bench. Gortsby has a theory. He believes people who live defeated lives wander about at dusk. Dusk is the time of day when it is almost dark. It is...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2012, 2:16 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

Gortsby has been having a brief conversation with a young man on a park bench. The young man has taken the place of an elderly gent, whom Gortsby imagines has gone home to what he presumes to be...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2018, 8:25 am (UTC)

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Dusk

It certainly seems apparent that the young man was showing his temper just to attract Gortsby's attention and get him to listen to a con artist's story about not being able to find his hotel and...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2012, 7:56 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Dusk

Saki describes the setting of "Dusk" from the point of view of a young man called Norman Gortsby. Dusk, to his mind, was the hour of the defeated. Men and women, who had fought and lost, who hid...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2013, 10:07 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

Norman Gortsby is the protagonist and narrator of the short story "Dusk" by Saki. Not much is known about Gortsby, such as his life or occupation, other than the fact that he likes to ruminate on...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2019, 9:52 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

This story also connects with the idea of hope: when Gortsby becomes convinced that the stranger is really a young aristocrat from the country, Gortsby rushes after him to give him some money,...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2014, 11:52 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

A brillant satirist, Saki is true to his inimitable style of ironic deception and clever dialogue that reveals his unsentimental depiction of life in his comedy of manners, "Dusk." Ridiculing the...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2011, 7:16 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

Dusk is used first to establish a mood. It is the time when the day ends and the night takes over. Daytime is busy. Nighttime is relaxed. No doubt the viewpoint character has put in a long day at...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2013, 11:44 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

Both the young con man in "Dusk" and the old man in "The Umbrella Man" have concocted stories that will bring them relatively large sums of money if they have the desired effect on the victim. If...

Latest answer posted January 20, 2014, 8:08 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

Let us remember that this interpretation only is in the mind of the protagonist, Gortsby, who enjoys dusk because of the way that he associates it with "the hour of the defeated." Note what he says...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2011, 7:18 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

The imagery used in Saki's short story, "Dusk," to describe the characters is very direct. Engaged readers are offered such detailed descriptions that they (the readers) can easily create mental...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2012, 5:37 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

Norman Gortsby is the viewpoint character in "Dusk." The author's intention is to show Norman having a learning experience which will convey a message to the reader. At first Norman does not feel...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2013, 9:47 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

Norman Gortsby is sitting on a park bench when another man comes before him claiming to be lost in London. He weaves a story in which he had gone out from his hotel to buy a bar of soap and have a...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2019, 11:54 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

My best suggestion for you is that you should use Google maps to look at the location of this story. All you have to do to use it is go to Google.com and click on the "maps" link. (Or follow the...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2010, 11:37 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

Of course, the quote you have cited could be argued to be the main message of this excellent story that uses situational irony so well in its ending. Note how the story is told using the third...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2011, 7:27 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

I often have a problem with these kinds of questions because they infer that there is something wrong with the ending that the author chose. Clearly, if we think about the story, what makes it so...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2011, 7:16 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

Saki's protagonist, Norman Gortsby, believes that "Dusk, to his mind, was the hour of the defeated." Ironically, given that Norman is out at dusk, Norman is admitting that he, himself, is defeated....

Latest answer posted July 10, 2012, 4:59 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

The young man who comes and sits beside Norman Gortsby is obviously practicing to be a con artist. Gortsby proves this when he listens to the hard-luck story and then tells him: "Of course," said...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2016, 1:06 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

It is interesting to compare the three characters in Saki's "Dusk" with the three characters in Dahl's "The Umbrella Man." In "Dusk" all three characters-- Gortsby, the young con man, and the...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2014, 12:05 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Dusk

Joining what he perceives as men and woman who hide their "fallen fortunes and dead hopes" in the twilight as they sit on benches or stroll in Hyde Park, Norman Grotsby is "in a mood to count...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2011, 6:34 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

The fact that the young man who sits by Gortsby is well dressed certainly lends credibility to his story of being on what seems to be a business trip, and his unfamiliarity with London. It also...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2016, 5:12 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

The story is told from the viewpoint of a young Londoner named Norman Gortsby. He is certainly not a gentleman of leisure but probably a man with a good position in a bank, brokerage, or trading...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2013, 1:06 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

The scene depicted of Gortsby is that of a solitary figure in an almost deserted place. This scene suggests that Gortsby is, perhaps, despondent or embittered because he seems to desire no human...

Latest answer posted June 24, 2016, 10:16 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

Saki devotes considerable attention to describing one section of the city at dusk. The scene pleased Gortsby and harmonized with his present mood. Dusk, to his mind, was the hour of the defeated....

Latest answer posted April 27, 2013, 10:48 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

In the short story "Dusk," the time of day is an appropriate time for tricksters to come out of hiding. As Gortsby sits on a park bench, he encounters two different type of men. The first man is an...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2012, 8:51 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

While sitting on the bench at "Dusk," Gortsby thinks depressing thoughts, associating the time of day with defeat and with hiding from others. When the young man sits down next to him, visibly...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2019, 3:01 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

A more specific question would help you to get a better answer... This is the story of Norman Gortsby. He is sitting on a park bench next to a bum. The bum leaves and another man comes up and...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2010, 10:04 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

The article on Saki in Wikipedia states: "Politically, Munro was a Tory and somewhat reactionary in his views." It gives as a reference an essay by Dominic Hibberd in the Oxford Dictionary of...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2013, 1:14 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

The story "Dusk" by Saki is about a man who gets duped despite of his self-proclaimed attainments in the understanding of people and their behaviors. This self-proclaimed ability to analyze people...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2012, 10:30 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

In the story "Dusk," the young man is plain lucky. When he cannot produce a bar of soap, Gortsby does not believe his story. The young man tells a story of forgetting where his hotel is. He claims...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2012, 9:47 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

Jim Thompson, a very good writer of hardboiled novels, describes what he calls "short cons" in his novel The Grifters, which has been made into a movie like many of Thompson's other novels,...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2013, 11:41 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

The double negative in the words "not disinclined" means essentially the same as "inclined." The word "inclined" itself is a modification of the notion that Gortsby was enjoying other people's...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2013, 12:25 pm (UTC)

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Dusk

By not naming either the young man or the old man in his story, Saki underscores the fact that they are both strangers. This is also implicit in the fact that it is getting dark, so that Gortsby...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2014, 11:47 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Dusk

In the short story "Dusk," the young man who sits down on the bench next to Gortsby is a con man. The younger man is a scam artist. He tricks Gortsby out of his money. When the younger man sits...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2012, 4:29 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

The actual wording in the story is as follows: "...one could go to one's Consul and get the requisite help from him....Unless i can find some decent chap to swallow my story and lend me some money...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2014, 6:29 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Dusk

Norman Gortsby is a rather cynical character who sits in the "gloaming" hour on a bench in London's Hyde Park where others of fallen fortune and hopes walk by. As Gortsby, who has failed in some...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2011, 5:43 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

The title "Dusk" and the description of dusk in London have a practical purpose in addition to establishing a scene and a mood. The young con man who sits down beside Gortsby has supposedly been...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2014, 11:49 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Dusk

This story is about the main character, Norman Gortsby, getting fooled by a con artist. Because of that, the story is really all about someone looking at external circumstances and being deceived...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2010, 10:47 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

Saki's short story Dusk signifies that dusk is the hour of the defeated in a couple different ways. First, Norman Gortsby (the protagonist) of the story states very blatantly the fact that only...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2011, 5:37 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

Stories like "Dusk" and "The Umbrella Man" owe their existence to the great American genius Edgar Allan Poe, who published an essay titled "Diddling" in 1850. "Diddling" was the term Poe used to...

Latest answer posted May 18, 2013, 10:25 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

The main reason for Saki's setting his story at that specific time and even giving the story the title "Dusk" had to do with the fact that the confidence men could not operate safely in broad...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2013, 3:25 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

The first part of this answer lies in the way that Gortsby imagines the people who come out at the hour of dusk, which, in his mind, is a time for those who have failed in life to emerge. Note how...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2011, 10:15 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Dusk

The cynical Grotsky sits on a bench at twilight in Hyde Park because the scene "harmonised with his present mood." In Grotsky's mind, dusk is the "hour of the defeated." While he watches the...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2011, 1:31 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

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