Dusk Questions and Answers

Dusk

According to a Wikipedia article on Saki which references an essay by Dominic Hibberd in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: Saki was a Tory and somewhat reactionary in his views. This...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2013 9:46 pm UTC

8 educator answers

Dusk

Norman Gortsby sits on a park bench at dusk, a time when, in his estimation, individuals who have experienced defeat in their lives can sojourn unrecognized. An elderly gentleman sits nexts to...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2010 4:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

This question has been asked and answered many times here on eNotes. Here is a comprehensive link for you: http://www.enotes.com/dusk-saki/q-and-a/tags/title

Latest answer posted August 5, 2011 3:49 am UTC

2 educator answers

Dusk

The young man who sits beside Norman Gortsby is acting angry for Gortsby's benefit. "You don't seem in a very good temper," said Gortsby, judging that he was expected to take due notice of the...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2013 9:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

The author establishes that Norman Gortsby is accustomed to sitting on a bench in this park at dusk and watching the passing crowd. Gortsby must have heard many hard-luck stories on these evenings....

Latest answer posted June 16, 2016 11:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

"Dusk" is a short story written by British short story writer and satirist Hector Hugh Munro, most commonly known by his pen name Saki and occasionally known by H. H. Munro. It was originally...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2019 1:33 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Dusk

In the story "Dusk" there is irony. It is ironic that the main character, who believes himself to be a good judge of character, gets deceived by the young man who shared the park bench with him....

Latest answer posted May 26, 2012 4:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

In Saki’s short story “Dusk,” Norman Gortsby sits on a park bench as evening arrives. As he sits on the bench, he is joined by two different men. Gortsby considers dusk to be the time of day when...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2016 1:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

The elderly gentleman is described from Gortsby's point of view: On the bench by his side sat an elderly gentleman with a drooping air of defiance that was probably the remaining vestige of...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2013 11:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

Norman Gortsby sits on a park bench in the Park where he comes at dusk. After an older gentleman leaves, a young man plunks himself down, uttering an expletive. "You don't seem in a very good...

Latest answer posted December 11, 2015 12:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

To me, the main theme of this story is that people are not able to really know what is in the hearts of the other people that they meet. I think that this is why the story is entitled "Dusk" --...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2010 1:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

“The Umbrella Man” and “Dusk” have one striking thing in common. The two tricksters obtain money by posing as men who don’t need money. The message in both stories seems to be that charity is...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2013 10:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

Norman Gortsby is a young man who apparently has a good job in some office in London. He is not married. Otherwise he would have gone home instead of sitting on a park bench at "thirty minutes past...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2016 7:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

Norman Gortsby, a sophisticated, cynical and skeptical young Londoner, is sitting on a park bench observing people, including an elderly gentleman seated beside him. Most of the men and women who...

Latest answer posted June 5, 2013 10:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

The title of Saki's short story,"Dusk," is appropriate given the setting of the story. Norman Gortsby, the protagonist of the story, defines dusk as "the hour of the defeated." Given that Norman is...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2012 10:58 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

This question has already been asked and answered right here on eNotes. Here is a link for you: http://www.enotes.com/saki/q-and-a/what-significance-title-dusk-explain-176683

Latest answer posted May 30, 2011 1:38 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Dusk

The ending of “Dusk” revolves around two interrelated ironies, both of which stem from Norman Gortsby’s condescending behavior and egocentric worldview. These interrelated ironies offer the reader...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2017 11:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

One significant fact about the young man is that he is young. This suggests that he is inexperienced as a con artist. He is intelligent and probably has expensive tastes. He has gotten the notion...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2013 11:42 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Dusk

If you want to take the position that the young stranger who sat down beside Norman Gortsby had just made up his hard-luck story on the spur of the moment, there are several clues you can offer....

Latest answer posted June 9, 2016 3:26 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

The old gentleman is a functional character in the story with whom Saki develops his surprise ending and accomplishes his theme. Norman Gortsby sits on a bench in Hyde Park, London, as darkness...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2009 1:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

The answer to your question can be found at the beginning of the story as we are introduced to Norman Gortsby and also, thanks to the third-person-limited point of view, given access to his...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2011 7:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

The young man that replaces the old gentleman who seems so defeated by the vicissitudes of life on the bench is described as being "fairly well dressed" but having the same depressed and browbeaten...

Latest answer posted May 27, 2011 8:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

Perhaps this would be a good place to try to explain exactly what the young man claims happened to him, since it seems pretty odd for a person to lose a hotel. The young man says he "came up this...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2013 11:03 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Dusk

In literature conflict is either internal (caused within the character), or external. Out of the external conflicts there are four distinct types that serve as catalysts which help the plot move...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2012 4:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

The story takes place at dusk. This is the time of day when it is just getting dark. The significance of the time of day is that the defeated people come out at dusk. It is a time of day when the...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2012 5:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

Saki seems to be deliberately leaving the ending of "Dusk" with an open question. Apparently the young stranger was a fledgling con artist who got a sovereign and a cake of soap from Gortsby by the...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2013 5:29 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Dusk

Norman Gortsby was apparently accustomed to lounging on a park bench at the end of the day. This suggests that he is not to be taken as a gentleman of leisure but as a young man with a...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2013 8:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

Gortsby learned what he thought he already knew. Don't be too trusting. Gortsby in his own cynicism was already on to people like the young man. Still, the young man tricked Gortsby into giving him...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2011 2:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

The young man in Saki's story seems to be a novice as a confidence trickster. He gives the impression of being from a middle-class background and currently unemployed. He seems to have gotten the...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2014 7:33 am UTC

2 educator answers

Dusk

The young man who tries to con Gortsby with a hard-luck story about losing his hotel appears to be a novice criminal. For one thing, he is "young," so he could not have had much experience. For...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2014 2:24 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Dusk

Gortsby believes the young man is lying and is trying to con him out of money. He believes himself a good judge of people, and, after listening to the young man's story, confronts him with the...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2011 4:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

The cake of soap obviously belongs to the elderly gentleman, but there are several questions it raises. For one thing, Gortsby found the soap and gave it to the young man who had told him the...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2013 7:57 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Dusk

The young stranger tells Gortsby that he left his hotel to buy a cake of soap. He ought to have the cake of soap in his possession to serve as proof of his story. It seems possible that the elderly...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2013 9:17 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Dusk

The title is a double entendre. On the one hand, the story takes place at dusk as Norman Grotsby sits "heartsore and disillusioned" in the twilight where others cannot discern the woe upon his...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2010 6:36 am UTC

2 educator answers

Dusk

"Dusk" is told by an omniscient third-person narrator through Norman Gortsby's point of view. He is sitting on a park bench watching people. This would seem to characterize him as something of a...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2013 8:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

It should be noted that the young man presents a sharp contrast to the other people Gortsby has been observing. He muses: Dusk, to his mind, was the hour of the defeated. Men and women, who had...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2013 1:25 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

Gortsby is one of life's observers. He likes nothing better than to engage in a spot or two of people-watching. From his exalted position on a park bench, he enjoys casting his Olympian gaze over...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2018 9:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

It is evident from the description of Gortsby's observations and reflections that he makes a habit of sitting on a bench in this general area around dusk, probably shortly after he gets off work in...

Latest answer posted May 9, 2016 3:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

Twilight, or dusk, is that moment in which day and night are suspended. Caught between two realms, dusk is the time of illusion when things may not seem what they are. And, it is this "gloaming...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2012 5:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

Climax is the moment of highest emotional intensity in a plot, when the outcome of the conflict is finally made clear to readers; this moment occurs in Saki's "Dusk" at the point in which Gortsby...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2010 2:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

Yes. In Saki's "Dusk," after Grotsky hands the young man a sovereign and his card, he reflects, Poor boy, he as nearly as possible broke down....I don't wonder either; the relief from this...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2010 6:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

H.H. Munro's short story "Dusk" tells of the protagonist's, Norman Gortsby, decision to help out a seemly down on his luck young man. The young man has no money and has forgotten what hotel he is...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2018 1:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

In "Dusk," the main character Gortsby was sitting in Hyde Park of London. It was about 6:30 in the evening, right before dark. Gortsby's philosophy was that those who are defeated come out at dusk,...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2012 8:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

Given that you did not specify which passage, this answer will address numerous passages and the qualities present in the protagonist for each passage. Saki's short story "Dusk" tells of Norman...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2018 6:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

In the story "Dusk," Gortsby is sitting on a park bench. Gortsby has a theory. He believes people who live defeated lives wander about at dusk. Dusk is the time of day when it is almost dark. It is...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2012 2:16 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Dusk

Gortsby is in a gloomy mood. He is observing the passers-by who seem to have waited for this time of day to come outside. Dusk, to his mind, was the hour of the defeated. Men and women, who had...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2013 5:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

The title "Dusk" seems quite appropriate for Saki's story for several reasons. Obviously, it creates a mood associated with the setting. Most importantly, however, is the fact that dusk is the time...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2013 10:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

In the short story "Dusk," the title is significant in that the setting takes place at dusk, the time between sunset and dark. The main character, Norman Gortsby, is sitting on a park bench at...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2011 1:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

"Dusk" is another classic story by Saki with a twist in its ending that surprises us all. However, your question relates to the initial paragraph, which builds up a description of the scene and...

Latest answer posted May 27, 2011 7:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dusk

This story also connects with the idea of hope: when Gortsby becomes convinced that the stranger is really a young aristocrat from the country, Gortsby rushes after him to give him some money,...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2014 11:52 pm UTC

2 educator answers

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