Dulce et Decorum Est Questions and Answers

Dulce et Decorum Est

The main message of this poem is that it is not "sweet and fitting to die for one's country" as so many people choose to believe; war is tragic and awful and gruesome and miserable, and so are the...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2019 8:28 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Similes rather than metaphors predominate in the description of the gassed soldier; the central one, as the previous post identifies, is His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin as he lies in...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2011 7:59 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

According to Merriam-Webster's dictionary, to be shod means to be wearing shoes or to be furnished with a shoe. The narrator of this poem tells us that the marching soldiers were in terrible shape...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2017 10:55 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Owen is writing about the young but exhausted, battle-worn soldiers on the front in World War I when he begins his double sonnet with the description that they were "Bent double,like old beggars...

Latest answer posted November 20, 2015 2:16 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In his poem "Dulce Et Decorum Est," Wilfred Owen depicts war as a brutal and senseless waste of human life. From the very first stanza, Wilfred tears down the idea that war is glorious. The...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2020 8:54 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In Owen's "Dulce et Decorum Est," the "old lie" is, as the poem says, "dulce et decorum est, pro patria mori." This is a Latin phrase which means "it is sweet and good to die for your country." In...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2018 8:07 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In terms of what this line represents in the poem, it describes a particularly horrific death that leads the narrator to the conclusion that the notion that "It is sweet and fitting to die for...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2016 8:18 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" by World War I poet Wilfred Owen does not adhere to any sort of formal poetic structure. Its four-stanza structure is irregular, as the first stanza contains 8...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2018 3:39 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In "Dulce et Decorum Est," Owen rejects the commonly accepted idea that fighting for your country is a glorious and heroic thing to do. To emphasize this message, Owen portrays the harsh realities...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2017 7:52 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In Wilfred Owen's "Dulce et Decorum Est," the short sentence "Men marched asleep" at the beginning of the fifth line marks an abrupt transition from the first to the third person. It is as though...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2020 10:37 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In the first stanza of the poem, the mood is gloomy and depressing. This is because Owen creates an image of soldiers who are battle-worn, fatigued and weary. They cough like "hags" and are missing...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2017 8:48 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The lie Wilfred Owen refers to is the Latin sentence that comes at the very end of the poem: Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori. Translated into English, this sentence means "How sweet and...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2016 4:10 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

"Dulce et Decorum Est" was written by Wilfred Owen, whose poetry was shaped by his own experiences in the trenches of World War I (and who would himself die shortly before the armistice). This poem...

Latest answer posted May 20, 2019 7:30 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Metaphorically speaking, one could argue that all of the choices you list can be considered relevant to the man who has been gassed. I would suggest, however, that the most striking image is one...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018 4:54 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The tone of this anti-war poem is bitter. Owens is bitter at the way warfare, and in particular World War I, has been glorified. This leads to the ironic title "Dulce et decorum est," a Latin...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2017 12:52 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

"Dulce et Decorum Est" is a poem full of irony, not least in the title, where the Roman poet Horace's famous observation that it is a sweet and honorable thing to die for one's country is repeated,...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2020 8:22 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The life of Wilfred Owen addresses the futility of war. At the start of World War I, Owen was an English teacher in France. After joining the war in 1917, Owen spent time in the hospital with shell...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2013 12:42 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Poet Wilfred Owen served during World War I until he was killed in action in 1918. His poem "Dolce et Decorum Est" captures the horrors of war. Owen uses his opening stanza, in which can be found...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2015 6:54 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

DULCE ET DECORUM EST are the first words of a Latin saying (taken from an ode by Horace). The words were often used as an oath and were frequently quoted by soldiers at the start of the First...

Latest answer posted July 23, 2009 11:34 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Wilfred Owen establishes assonance in the title and first line and then applies it consistently through the poem. It helps to keep in mind that assonance is oral and not related to spelling. It...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2018 5:49 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

I don't know that I would call this a "joke" of any kind, but I suppose you are really asking about Owen's deliberate choice of words here being at once a metaphor and, almost, a homophone for...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2019 12:40 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The central message of Owen's poem features a stinging rebuke of war. The poem captures the innocence of soldiers who are put in harm's way without the faintest of idea that what they engage upon...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2014 3:23 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

There are several major shifts in the poem. In lines 1-8, Owen describes the horrible battle fatigue the men must endure in during World War I. They are described as " old beggars under sacks," and...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2009 10:20 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

These lines of Wilfred Owen’s poem “Dulce et Decorum Est” refer to different things. The first part of the line you mention refers to the glass lenses, vision ports, in the gas masks the soldiers...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2016 12:36 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In World War I, the use of poison gas as a weapon was introduced. The soldier who inhaled what was most likely, in this poem, chlorine gas, was "flung" into the back of a wagon to be carted away,...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2016 8:53 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Wilfred Owen wrote poems that are astringent rather than sentimental. His poem "Dulce et Decorum Est"—a title taken from the last two lines from Horace, Odes III:ii: "Sweet and fitting it is to die...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2017 1:18 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

“Dulce Et Decorum Est” is a perfect example of poetry’s ability to reflect the changing worldview of an entire generation after World War I. In fact, there was a popular saying in Britain after...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2013 10:18 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" was written by Wilfred Owen while he was a soldier during World War I. Tragically, he died in action about a year later in November 1918. The graphic images of the...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2019 2:36 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Interestingly, the intended audience for Wilfred Owen's graphic war poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" is other poets, specifically one poet named Jessie Pope. Owen originally entitled this poem, "To...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2016 6:10 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,Till on the haunting flares we turned our backsAnd towards our distant rest began to trudge. Owen...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2019 4:30 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Although the word "horror" is absent from the poem, Wilfred Owen describes the horror of war through a series of images. In the first stanza, a group of fellow soldiers are returning from battle....

Latest answer posted June 6, 2017 6:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dulce et Decorum Est

The meter is iambic pentameter, usually regarded the most frequently used metrical form in English poetry. It consists, of course, of five poetic "feet" per line, each foot being an iamb, an...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2020 1:40 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Wilfred Owen’s poem titled “Dulce et Decorum Est” employs a number of similes (that is, comparisons that use the words “like” or “as”). One might argue that these similes, as the poem proceeds,...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2012 11:00 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The title and last line translated from the Latin mean It is sweet and honorable, to die for one's country. The use of Latin is appropriate for this classical, epic view of war. It is a view Owen...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2012 3:01 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Owen changes the tempo or flow of the poem from stanza to stanza and within stanzas. The tempo of the first stanza is slow and plodding, reflecting the intense weariness of the soldiers. Owen...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2021 11:58 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The speaker in Wilfred Owen's "Dulce et Decorum Est" is a soldier who has experienced shell shock, or as we would now call it, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), after taking part in trench...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2016 4:52 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

These quotes from the poem are describing the effects of poison gas. The ‘five-nines’ referred to are German artillery shells which contain the deadly gas (probably chlorine, which was only one of...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2014 6:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dulce et Decorum Est

Robert Owen's poem "Dulce Et Decorum Est" is an influential and moving poem about the horrors of World War I, known at the time of the writing as the Great War. The poem marked a departure from...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2016 1:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dulce et Decorum Est

One of the definite strengths of this poem is the way that it sets us up with definite expectations about what to expect because of its title, and then presents us with the exact opposite. With...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2011 4:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dulce et Decorum Est

The thesis of this anti-war poem is that war is degrading and horrible. It is anything but "sweet and fitting" (which is what "dulce and decorum" means). People in English society might have been...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2019 10:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dulce et Decorum Est

The central message of "Dulce et Decorum Est" is that, if the reader could see what the speaker has seen -- the real horrors of war, the awful human toll, a young man's eyes as they roll around in...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2016 7:29 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The central stanzas, detailing the loss of a man to gas: GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling,Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;But someone still was yelling out and...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2012 4:34 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Oxymorons, figures of speech that put together two opposing words, often create paradoxes with just a few words. In the second stanza of Wilfred Owen's "Dolce et Decorum Est," the oxymoron is in...

Latest answer posted June 1, 2016 7:24 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

This poem reminds those who have read Erich Maria Remarque's World War I novel, All Quiet on the Western Front of the tragic results that occurred for the young men who, in their chauvanism for...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2012 12:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dulce et Decorum Est

In this bitterly anti-war poem, Owens hopes to highlight the irony of the old Latin phrase "dulce et decorum est," which means that war is sweet and proper. Instead, Owens wants the reader to see...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2019 9:24 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The speaker of the poem describes the fellow soldier who inhales poison gas as “stumbling” around, yelling, and “flound’ring” like a man on fire or as one who is “drowning” and gasps for air. He...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2021 2:37 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Wilfred Owen seems to purposely name his war poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" in order to expose the glamorization of war and the lie that it is a "wonderful and great honour to fight and die" for one's...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2012 6:46 am UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

This particular image in Wilfred Owen's "Dulce Et Decorum Est" is especially potent in its frank depiction of the horrors of World War I. The soldier who fails to put on his gas mask suffers an...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2016 9:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dulce et Decorum Est

Wilfred Owens' poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" (1920) is modeled on a poem by the Roman poet Horace entitled "Dulce et Decorum est Pro Patria Mori," which means "it is sweet and proper to die for one's...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2013 9:24 pm UTC

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Whenever we think of rhyme schemes in a poem we normally map them by matching a letter to particular rhyme for the duration of the poem and seeing how it continues. Therefore to give you a simple...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2011 4:48 am UTC

1 educator answer

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