Dulce et Decorum Est Questions and Answers

Dulce et Decorum Est

This vivid simile is an interesting one to try to unpack. Owen describes the "hanging" face of a soldier who has been thrown into a wagon. His eyes are "writhing" in his face and his lungs are...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2021, 11:19 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In Owen's "Dulce et Decorum Est," the "old lie" is, as the poem says, "dulce et decorum est, pro patria mori." This is a Latin phrase which means "it is sweet and good to die for your country." In...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2018, 8:07 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

According to Merriam-Webster's dictionary, to be shod means to be wearing shoes or to be furnished with a shoe. The narrator of this poem tells us that the marching soldiers were in terrible shape...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2017, 10:55 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Owen is writing about the young but exhausted, battle-worn soldiers on the front in World War I when he begins his double sonnet with the description that they were "Bent double,like old beggars...

Latest answer posted November 20, 2015, 2:16 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The main message of this poem is that it is not "sweet and fitting to die for one's country" as so many people choose to believe; war is tragic and awful and gruesome and miserable, and so are the...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2019, 8:28 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

"Dulce et Decorum Est" is a poem full of irony, not least in the title, where the Roman poet Horace's famous observation that it is a sweet and honorable thing to die for one's country is repeated,...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2020, 8:22 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In his poem "Dulce Et Decorum Est," Wilfred Owen depicts war as a brutal and senseless waste of human life. From the very first stanza, Wilfred tears down the idea that war is glorious. The...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2020, 8:54 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In Wilfred Owen's "Dulce et Decorum Est," the short sentence "Men marched asleep" at the beginning of the fifth line marks an abrupt transition from the first to the third person. It is as though...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2020, 10:37 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In the second stanza of the poem, Owen describes the excruciating agony experienced by a soldier caught in a poison gas attack. The Germans used poison gas as a weapon in World War One; in 1915, in...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2021, 11:34 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In the first stanza of the poem, the mood is gloomy and depressing. This is because Owen creates an image of soldiers who are battle-worn, fatigued and weary. They cough like "hags" and are missing...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2017, 8:48 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Similes rather than metaphors predominate in the description of the gassed soldier; the central one, as the previous post identifies, is His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin as he lies in...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2011, 7:59 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" by World War I poet Wilfred Owen does not adhere to any sort of formal poetic structure. Its four-stanza structure is irregular, as the first stanza contains 8...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2018, 3:39 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The tone of this anti-war poem is bitter. Owens is bitter at the way warfare, and in particular World War I, has been glorified. This leads to the ironic title "Dulce et decorum est," a Latin...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2017, 12:52 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Poet Wilfred Owen served during World War I until he was killed in action in 1918. His poem "Dolce et Decorum Est" captures the horrors of war. Owen uses his opening stanza, in which can be found...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2015, 6:54 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,Till on the haunting flares we turned our backsAnd towards our distant rest began to trudge. Owen...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2019, 4:30 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In terms of what this line represents in the poem, it describes a particularly horrific death that leads the narrator to the conclusion that the notion that "It is sweet and fitting to die for...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2016, 8:18 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Owen makes some graphic comparisons regarding the soldiers that help readers understand the emotional and physical realities facing the men who fought in World War I. First he compares them to "old...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2016, 4:11 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Interestingly, the intended audience for Wilfred Owen's graphic war poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" is other poets, specifically one poet named Jessie Pope. Owen originally entitled this poem, "To...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2016, 6:10 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The title of this poem about World War I comes from a longer Latin phrase: Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori. In English, it means "it is sweet and proper to die for one's country," much the...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2021, 12:11 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

I don't know that I would call this a "joke" of any kind, but I suppose you are really asking about Owen's deliberate choice of words here being at once a metaphor and, almost, a homophone for...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2019, 12:40 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

"Obscene as cancer"is a subset of metaphor called simile. A metaphor is a comparison, and a simile is a particular form of comparison that uses the words "like" or "as." "Obscene as cancer" is a...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2021, 1:52 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The thesis of this anti-war poem is that war is degrading and horrible. It is anything but "sweet and fitting" (which is what "dulce and decorum" means). People in English society might have been...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2019, 10:43 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Wilfred Owen wrote poems that are astringent rather than sentimental. His poem "Dulce et Decorum Est"—a title taken from the last two lines from Horace, Odes III:ii: "Sweet and fitting it is to die...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2017, 1:18 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The speaker of the poem describes the fellow soldier who inhales poison gas as “stumbling” around, yelling, and “flound’ring” like a man on fire or as one who is “drowning” and gasps for air. He...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2021, 2:37 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

To fully appreciate this stylistic choice, it's important to return to the ending of the first stanza. The speaker is part of a group of soldiers who are weary from fighting. They march as if they...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2021, 1:41 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

These lines of Wilfred Owen’s poem “Dulce et Decorum Est” refer to different things. The first part of the line you mention refers to the glass lenses, vision ports, in the gas masks the soldiers...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2016, 12:36 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The life of Wilfred Owen addresses the futility of war. At the start of World War I, Owen was an English teacher in France. After joining the war in 1917, Owen spent time in the hospital with shell...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2013, 12:42 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

"Drunk with fatigue" is indeed a metaphor. The soldiers Owen is describing are not literally drunk, and of course it is not literally possible to drink fatigue. However, what Owen is suggesting is...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2021, 11:26 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" was written by Wilfred Owen while he was a soldier during World War I. Tragically, he died in action about a year later in November 1918. The graphic images of the...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2019, 2:36 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Wilfred Owen’s “Dulce et Decorum Est” graphically describes the horrors of war from his experience as a solder in World War I. He opens the poem with: Bent double, like old beggars under...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2021, 2:47 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In World War I, the use of poison gas as a weapon was introduced. The soldier who inhaled what was most likely, in this poem, chlorine gas, was "flung" into the back of a wagon to be carted away,...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2016, 8:53 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The lie Wilfred Owen refers to is the Latin sentence that comes at the very end of the poem: Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori. Translated into English, this sentence means "How sweet and...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2016, 4:10 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

This phrase is used to describe the dreadful appearance of a young soldier who has inhaled some kind of poison gas and is now dying, slowly and painfully. He did not get his gas mask on in time,...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2021, 12:17 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Metaphorically speaking, one could argue that all of the choices you list can be considered relevant to the man who has been gassed. I would suggest, however, that the most striking image is one...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018, 4:54 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Wilfred Owen establishes assonance in the title and first line and then applies it consistently through the poem. It helps to keep in mind that assonance is oral and not related to spelling. It...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2018, 5:49 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

There are several major shifts in the poem. In lines 1-8, Owen describes the horrible battle fatigue the men must endure in during World War I. They are described as " old beggars under sacks," and...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2009, 10:20 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

These quotes from the poem are describing the effects of poison gas. The ‘five-nines’ referred to are German artillery shells which contain the deadly gas (probably chlorine, which was only one of...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2014, 6:20 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Although the word "horror" is absent from the poem, Wilfred Owen describes the horror of war through a series of images. In the first stanza, a group of fellow soldiers are returning from battle....

Latest answer posted June 6, 2017, 6:19 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The men are knock-kneed and coughing like hags because they are exhausted and battle weary from being at the front. They are "drunk with fatigue," yet they have to plunge on through sludge to get...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2019, 8:45 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In this bitterly anti-war poem, Owens hopes to highlight the irony of the old Latin phrase "dulce et decorum est," which means that war is sweet and proper. Instead, Owens wants the reader to see...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2019, 9:24 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In "Dulce et Decorum Est," Owen rejects the commonly accepted idea that fighting for your country is a glorious and heroic thing to do. To emphasize this message, Owen portrays the harsh realities...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2017, 7:52 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

"Dulce et Decorum Est" was written by Wilfred Owen, whose poetry was shaped by his own experiences in the trenches of World War I (and who would himself die shortly before the armistice). This poem...

Latest answer posted May 20, 2019, 7:30 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

One can absolutely read “Dulce et Decorum Est” as an anti-war poem. The speaker describes the idea that it is sweet and becoming to die for one’s country—via a quotation in Latin from the Roman...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2021, 11:47 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The speaker in Wilfred Owen's "Dulce et Decorum Est" is a soldier who has experienced shell shock, or as we would now call it, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), after taking part in trench...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2016, 4:52 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The title and last line translated from the Latin mean It is sweet and honorable, to die for one's country. The use of Latin is appropriate for this classical, epic view of war. It is a view Owen...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2012, 3:01 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

The meter is iambic pentameter, usually regarded the most frequently used metrical form in English poetry. It consists, of course, of five poetic "feet" per line, each foot being an iamb, an...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2020, 1:40 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Oxymorons, figures of speech that put together two opposing words, often create paradoxes with just a few words. In the second stanza of Wilfred Owen's "Dolce et Decorum Est," the oxymoron is in...

Latest answer posted June 1, 2016, 7:24 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Since the dawn of civilization and up until today, men have waged wars, and from our earliest literature, as Owens notes in the poem, soldiering has been glorified as a sweet and noble duty to...

Latest answer posted August 27, 2019, 1:48 pm (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

In the last line of the first stanza, the speaker refers to the “gas shells dropping softly behind” the soldiers as they trudge through the mud of the battlefields. The first line of the second...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2021, 11:35 am (UTC)

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Dulce et Decorum Est

Imagery is created when an author uses vivid language to describe sensory details. Therefore, imagery can be visual, for something we might see; auditory, for something we might hear; olfactory,...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2021, 11:35 am (UTC)

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