Dreams Questions and Answers

Dreams

Langston Hughes's poem “Dreams” is only eight lines long, but it is packed with meaning and filled with literary devices that enhance its interest and beauty. Hughes employs personification when he...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2021 4:21 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Dreams

Langston Hughes uses imagery, metaphor, apostrophe, repetition, and parallelism in this poem. Imagery is description that employs any of the fives senses of sight, sound, touch, taste, or smell....

Latest answer posted February 5, 2021 11:32 am UTC

4 educator answers

Dreams

The most famous writer of the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes became the "poet laureate of Harlem." He once commented on his poetry as verse that deals with people up today and down...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2017 2:29 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Dreams

"Dreams" is an accessible poem known for its plainspoken diction and simple style; it is noted for having been one of the thematic inspirations behind Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream"...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2018 7:09 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Dreams

You have said that there is personification in this poem, which there arguably could be in the idea of dreams dying, or going, but that isn't straightforward, clear-cut personification. Lots of...

Latest answer posted April 28, 2018 8:47 am UTC

2 educator answers

Dreams

It is also possible to read this poem as having a somewhat hopeless and sad tone, as though Hughes knows that many readers will not take his advice concerning the importance of keeping dreams alive...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2017 12:22 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Dreams

Tone is the attitude the speaker takes toward the subject of the literary work. In "Dreams," the primary subject consists of the outcome of unfulfilled dreams. The tone of this poem feels at once...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2020 4:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

Langston Hughes'' short poem "Dreams" is a lyric poem, yes, but I'm not sure that I'd call it free verse. Read the poem slowly out loud: Hold fast to dreamsFor if dreams dieLife is a broken-winged...

Latest answer posted February 6, 2010 2:33 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

Since the speaker of Langston Hughes's poem "Dreams" is not identified, one might interpret that the speaker of the poem is Hughes himself. In the poem, Hughes urges his readers to hold on to their...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2016 8:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

One theme to Langston Hughes's poem is that to feel oneself a fulfilled person, one must dream; for without dreams, one's spirit becomes barren and broken. Without dreams, one lives, as Henry David...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2013 5:18 am UTC

2 educator answers

Dreams

The fundamental message of the poem "Dreams" is that we should all try to achieve our dreams and aspirations. Without these dreams, the speaker says, "Life is a broken-winged bird." The implication...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2021 8:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

The idea of resignation, and giving up, and then the suggestion of an explosion and the implication of danger always reminds me of the plight of young people in the inner city. Time and time...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2009 1:30 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Dreams

The metrical pattern in Langston Hughes' poem "Dreams" is very simplistic. What one needs to do when determining meter in a poem is read it aloud. To note syllables, place your finger under your...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2011 9:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

The poem “Dreams” comes from Hughes collection “The Weary Blues,” which describes many aspects of inequality and life in a segregated America. He discusses music, pride, and suffering throughout...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2019 12:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

A foot, or metric foot, in poetry is the number of units per line. The specific definition of a poetic foot is pretty complex and can depend on the type of poem and the language, but in English, it...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2019 12:18 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Dreams

Langston Hughes wrote for the African-American people. One of his most frequent topics was dreams. To him, dreams were the "hope" for the black man. One of the most famous poems in American...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2012 8:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

The metaphor in the first stanza compares a life with no dreams to an incapacitated bird: the speaker says For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird That cannot fly (2–4). A metaphor is a...

Latest answer posted August 11, 2020 12:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

In Hughes' poem, he urges readers to hold on to their dreams. Without dreams, he says, using two different metaphors, life is like a bird with broken wings and like a frozen, snow-covered field. In...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2019 5:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

Langston Hughes's inspirational poem, "Dreams" urges young people to tenaciously keep their dreams and goals. Just as Robert Browning wrote, Ah, but a man's reach should exceed his grasp--or...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2013 5:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

The theme of the poem is stated in the first line, "Hold fast to dreams," and it is then developed through metaphors. If our dreams die, the poem says, life becomes a bird with a broken wing...

Latest answer posted October 9, 2011 6:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

One of the themes that emerges from Hughes' poem is the defense of one's dreams. Hughes reaffirms this themes in a couple of critical moments in the poem. The opening line of "Hold fast to...

Latest answer posted June 24, 2013 1:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Dreams

What Langston Hughes is saying about the American Dream is that it is, essentially, everything in life. Look at what he says about dreams -- if they die, then you have nothing, you can't fly,...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2009 3:48 am UTC

1 educator answer