Don Juan Questions and Answers

Don Juan

In Don Juan, a satirical poem by Lord Byron, Byron uses the well-known character of Don Juan in reverse: instead of a womanizer, he is passive, pursued instead of pursuing. Byron allows Don Juan to...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2019 12:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

Don Juan

The Don Juan of legend and of the earlier literary treatments that predate Romanticism, when contrasted with Byron’s quite different treatment of the character, can be discussed in terms of these...

Latest answer posted April 15, 2019 2:10 pm UTC

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Don Juan

Don Juan does not strike me as a Byronic hero. The Byronic hero has qualities that reflected Lord Byron himself. As outlined in Byron's The Corsair, the Byronic hero is "that man of loneliness and...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2016 1:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Don Juan

The "Dedication" of Byron's Don Juan is, like his epic poem overall, a vehicle for Byron to express his political, literary and personal views, focusing in these opening stanzas on the poet Robert...

Latest answer posted May 4, 2018 5:36 am UTC

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Don Juan

What is so funny in this Canto are the author's very ironic and tongue-in-cheek reflections on love and women, which are obviously meant to provoke humour in the audience. This comes from Don...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2013 8:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

Don Juan

I can give you background on Byron's emphasis on the individual, which you can apply to the homework (the reading of the two works): Both works focus on the Bryonic Hero, which is a very close...

Latest answer posted April 25, 2010 10:24 pm UTC

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Don Juan

Unfinished at the time of his death in 1824 and hailed by some scholars as his greatest work, Byron’s “Don Juan” is a lengthy satirical epic wherein no colleague of Byron—Southey, Coleridge, and...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2017 9:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Don Juan

Don Juan is a fantastic poem. You would be hard pressed not to find it included in a British literature anthology textbook. It is exceedingly clever, it is exceptionally well written, and the...

Latest answer posted June 2, 2020 3:36 pm UTC

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Don Juan

With Haidée, Byron basically wants to point out not just the double standards of what was supposed to be a rigid society with specific gender roles, but also the complex nature of romance in...

Latest answer posted December 10, 2014 9:26 pm UTC

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Don Juan

Byron is decrying the limited choices that women have in life in this stanza and indeed throughout the poem. A woman must put up with a man's "injustices" (drunkenness, unfaithfulness, etc) because...

Latest answer posted December 18, 2014 6:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Don Juan

To answer this, I'll have to quote the stanza in its entirety initially in order to analyse how it functions: Brave men were living before Agamemnon And since, exceeding valorous and sage, A good...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2014 9:52 am UTC

1 educator answer