A Doll's House Questions and Answers

A Doll's House

Henrik Ibsen uses numerous literary devices in A Doll’s House. These include two types of comparisons, metaphor and simile. Throughout the play, he frequently employs dramatic irony. With this...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2021 3:07 am UTC

3 educator answers

A Doll's House

Henrik Ibsen’s play A Doll’s House exemplifies realism in drama through its overall approach to representing life. This approach is laid out through the setting, plot, characters, and dialogue. The...

Latest answer posted January 17, 2021 2:07 am UTC

3 educator answers

A Doll's House

[eNotes editors are only permitted to answer one question per posting. If you have other questions, please post them separately.] Although Henrik Ibsen is often considered an advocate for women's...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2011 2:03 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

The title of A Doll's House is a reference to the protagonist, Nora, and her domestic station in life. Consider what a doll's house is in the literal sense of the term. It is quite beautiful and...

Latest answer posted January 9, 2020 9:53 am UTC

3 educator answers

A Doll's House

A Doll’s House, produced in 1879, was written as a social problem drama. Playwright Henrik Ibsen recognized that one of the most pressing situations in European society in his era stemmed from...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2020 9:28 pm UTC

4 educator answers

A Doll's House

Nora leaves the children with Torvald because as a woman she has no other option; she needs to find her true self before she can be a mother to them, she fears that she is a bad influence, and she...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2021 1:12 am UTC

5 educator answers

A Doll's House

A Doll's House takes place entirely within the confines of the Helmer household; other locations are merely alluded to within the work. The author of the play, Henrik Ibsen, was Norwegian, and the...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2020 5:38 pm UTC

4 educator answers

A Doll's House

In A Doll’s House, the relationship between Mr. Krogstad and Mrs. Linde contrasts the marriage between Nora and Torvald Helmer. Krogstad and Linde’s union is based on honesty and forgiveness; on...

Latest answer posted December 25, 2020 9:01 pm UTC

4 educator answers

A Doll's House

When Nora’s character makes her initial entrance, the first thing she does after tipping the porter is to make sure the coast is clear to furtively pop a couple of the dainty confections into her...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2021 10:36 pm UTC

3 educator answers

A Doll's House

The tarantella is a dance which is characterized by quick, light steps and an upbeat tempo and has historically been seen as a dance of cheerful courtship. References to the tarantella are woven...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2020 11:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

There are many themes in Ibsen's A Doll's House. Perhaps the most significant theme (though unintended by Ibsen) is that of the absence of the female identity in the male-dominated society. Years...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2016 7:33 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

In Ibsen's drama A Doll's House, he writes about a modern social tragedy. Ibsen's play is considered modern drama. In fact, Ibsen establishes a new genre known as modern drama. Prior to A Doll's...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2013 12:11 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

In the play A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, Nora Helmer commits the crime of forgery. She signs her father's signature to a loan document, although her father has passed away. Nora has two...

Latest answer posted January 12, 2017 2:12 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

Henrik Ibsen, in his play, A Doll's House, intends to reveal how everyone is subject to the limitations and expectations of others; thus creating stereotypes. in 1879, not only women were trapped...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2013 10:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

Being made in a more realist style of drama, the acting method called for in A Doll's House is necessarily more intimate and restrained. Much of nineteenth century drama was more histrionic and...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2019 5:21 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

On the face of it, it would appear that Nora is weak, unworldly, and submissive. In this, she is very much a product of her conventional upbringing. In those days, girls in respectable families...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2019 10:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

The dollhouse that the Burnell girls receive from "dear old Mrs. Hay" is a rather garish replica of a house belonging to the upper class, yet it is intriguing in its realistic detail. When this...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2018 2:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

Dr. Rank, a close and old friend of the family who visits Torvald and Nora every day, has spinal tuberculosis, a disease Nora thinks was caused by his father's lascivious lifestyle, including many...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2017 1:28 pm UTC

3 educator answers

A Doll's House

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House is an example of realism, although the terms "realism" and "naturalism" are often used interchangeably. A distinction between realism and naturalism is that naturalism...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2019 8:34 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

I second the idea of freedom and identity. Nora is being suppressed and in a world which encourages the woman to just shut up and take it, she rebels. Had her husband respected her and given her...

Latest answer posted May 18, 2008 3:33 pm UTC

4 educator answers

A Doll's House

Ibsen's play ends with Nora deciding to break up her marriage, leave her husband and children, and go off on her own. She hopes to develop an identity of her own. This decision is the surprising...

Latest answer posted December 5, 2012 7:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

Nora once forged her father's signature on a loan application so that she could obtain money for her husband Torvald to have a rest cure abroad. This in itself would be shocking to a nineteenth...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2019 7:46 am UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

More than anything else, Nora's fancy dress symbolizes her subordination to her husband, Torvald. This rather fetching Neapolitan fisher-girl's dress isn't something that Nora wears for herself but...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2020 11:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

Nora and Torvald's relationship is not really a fundamentally strong one because it is founded on appearances rather than trust and truth. Nora keeps up appearances and acts a bit like a child when...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2019 1:40 am UTC

4 educator answers

A Doll's House

The "miracle of miracles" is that Torvald Helmer would love his wife Nora as an equal—that is, he must recognize her as a person, not as a "doll wife." Near the end of Act III of A Doll's House,...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2017 5:09 am UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

In A Doll's House, Nora Helmer carries the heavy burden of a devastating secret, which is revealed to her domineering husband toward the end of the play. In act 1, Nora is visited by her former...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2020 11:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

Henrik Ibsen’s ground-breaking play A Doll’s House premiered in Copenhagen in 1879.Particularly for modern audiences, it’s easy to make the mistake of believing that Torvald Helmer does not love...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2016 9:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

A Doll's House is a quintessential problem play. In it, Ibsen presents the problem of women's place in society. However, many at the time might not have recognized this as a problem but more as...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2011 3:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

Henrik Ibsen wrote plays that dealt with many taboo subjects of the time, including the place of women in society, venereal disease, marriage, and double standards; A Doll's House features all of...

Latest answer posted September 19, 2008 1:07 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

In Henrik Ibsen’s play, hereditary disease is presented as social and moral afflictions, not just physical ailments. In particular, the character of Dr. Rank both embodies and expresses the role of...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2019 1:28 am UTC

3 educator answers

A Doll's House

In A Doll’s House, the lamp represents both false security and the illumination of truth. In the play, Ibsen introduces the lamp as a prop that characters use as protection and as a device to...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2020 2:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

At the end of the play, Nora Helmer makes a radical decision to leave her husband, Torvald, and her children in order to live independently of society's expectations for women and discover who she...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2018 5:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

The geographic and historical setting of the play A Doll's House is an unspecified city, arguably in Norway, around the 1870's. This time period is known as the Victorian Era, and it lasted from...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2016 9:59 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

It is interesting that the children are but minor characters in this play that is so much about the family and Nora as a mother and as a wife. It is also important to note that the way Nora...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2011 7:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

An interesting symbol that is usually not mentioned is the dance, the Tarantella, that Nora practices for Torvald. During this dance, Nora is full of excitement, nervous energy and agitation, so...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2008 7:08 am UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

Act I of Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House introduces us to the seemingly happy abode of Nora and Helmer Torvald, a young, middle class couple that epitomizes conjugal happiness and family bliss to the...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2012 12:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

It's sometimes difficult to determine the difference between an incident in a play that represents foreshadowing (as definitively reflecting later plot developments in the play) and an incident...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2019 9:05 pm UTC

3 educator answers

A Doll's House

Ibsen names his drama A Doll's House because Torvald treats his wife Nora as a toy. Nora is Torvald's prized possession. He treats her as a child; therefore, the title is befitting. Torvald has...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2011 11:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

The inciting incident in any story is the catalyst for the action which is to follow. In other words, it is the moment at which the status quo is disturbed, prompting the protagonist to begin a...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2020 11:05 am UTC

4 educator answers

A Doll's House

In the play, Nora is portrayed as a submissive housewife who is primarily concerned with pleasing her controlling, insensitive husband, Torvald Helmer. Torvald views and treats Nora like a doll and...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2020 11:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

Notice at the end of the play how Nora explicitly identifies herself with a doll to explain how she has been treated by Helmer during their marriage: I was your little songbird just as...

Latest answer posted March 18, 2011 7:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

One of the key issues in A Doll's House is the tendency of men, particularly in this historical context, to dismiss the ideas and the value which women hold in their societies. From the beginning,...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2020 12:17 pm UTC

5 educator answers

A Doll's House

Torvald Helmer's first two lines actually include two different nicknames for his wife, Nora. He first asks, from another room, "Is that my lark twittering there?" Nora responds that it is she that...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2018 11:38 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

The play A Doll’s House was written by the Norwegian author and playwright Henrik Ibsen and was first put on stage in 1879. Betrayal is a big theme throughout this play right from the start. In...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2020 11:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

Kristine Linde acts as a foil to Nora, highlighting certain character traits which Nora has. Though initially a minor, somewhat insignificant character, Kristine comes to perform a crucial role in...

Latest answer posted February 1, 2018 5:29 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

Torvald has various nicknames for Nora, many of which begin with the word “my.” As the head of the house, he has assumed complete control over not only the household but everything and everyone in...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2020 2:15 am UTC

4 educator answers

A Doll's House

The quotation provided is a version of a passage from the Bible, Timothy 6:10: For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2019 5:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Doll's House

A foil is a character which illuminates the positive and negative qualities of a main character. Krogstad does this for Torvald in that they have many of the same experiences and skills but they...

Latest answer posted June 12, 2007 12:13 am UTC

2 educator answers

A Doll's House

Torvald's use of pet names for his wife, Nora, shows that he thinks of her as more of an object than a person. She is something cute and small: something which ought to obey him as her master,...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2020 9:55 am UTC

4 educator answers

A Doll's House

I would argue that the main conflict in this play is of the character versus society variety. Nora Helmer opposes the standards her society sets for women, standards which have compelled her to...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2018 10:58 pm UTC

2 educator answers

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