Desert Places Questions and Answers

Desert Places

In Robert Frost's "Desert Places," the rhyme scheme is A A B A. A rhyme scheme is what the author uses to create a pattern of rhyme. In this case, Frost sticks to that pattern throughout the poem....

Latest answer posted August 18, 2011, 2:11 pm (UTC)

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Desert Places

The speaker in Frost's poem is somebody who is deeply acquainted with loneliness. Indeed, he stipulates at the end of the poem that no matter how lonely the world around him may feel, this does not...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2018, 7:52 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Desert Places

The "denotation" of a word is the actual, dictionary definition. In the same vein, the "connotation" is the suggestion of the meaning of a word apart from what it explicitly means. By definition,...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2011, 6:33 pm (UTC)

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Desert Places

Robert Frost is one of the greatest modern poets of American literature. His poems are embedded with thought-provoking symbolism. In the poem "Desert Places," Frost delves into the theme of...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2019, 9:29 pm (UTC)

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Desert Places

Robert Frost builds the power in the poem by using the primary symbol of snow and its related color, white, and then employing the clear contrast of night falling, which is echoed at the end with...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2018, 2:47 am (UTC)

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Desert Places

The previous post was quite accurate in suggesting that the entire poem has a strongly negative feel to it. I think the third stanza contains the most imagery that seems negative to me. Much of...

Latest answer posted December 25, 2009, 9:23 pm (UTC)

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Desert Places

Imagery is the use of words to convey sensory experience. It can be visual (describing something one can see), auditory (describing something one can hear), tactile (describing something one can...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2018, 8:30 pm (UTC)

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Desert Places

The title of Robert Frost’s poem “Desert Places” is particularly intriguing. We normally think of “desert places” as vast areas of dry sand baked under the blistering heat of the sun. We think of...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2011, 2:58 am (UTC)

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Desert Places

The opening lines of Robert Frost’s poem “Desert Places” quickly establish the setting of the poem, while the falling snow affects different things in the first three stanzas of the work. In lines...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2011, 1:37 pm (UTC)

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Desert Places

In "Desert Places," by Robert Frost, there is a significant change in the rhyming words used in the last stanza of the poem. Even though the same pattern is kept with the first, second, and fourth...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2011, 8:31 am (UTC)

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Desert Places

In "Desert Places," Robert Frost takes a scene from nature and uses it as a springboard for a philosophical idea. The poem begins with a description of a field filling up with snow at night:...

Latest answer posted January 20, 2011, 8:37 am (UTC)

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Desert Places

The use of the term "desert places" in Robert Frost's poem of that title uses the term in the classical sense in which the term desert meant an area that was uninhabited, or what would, in modern...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2012, 6:58 am (UTC)

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Desert Places

The speaker of the poem "Desert Places" laments his deep sense of loneliness and lack of a sense of belonging. He uses imagery of comparison and contrast to bring home the loneliness he feels. The...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2019, 9:59 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Desert Places

In the poem 'Desert Places' by Robert Frost we have a lovely description in the first stanza. It is not only the snow falling, but the night too, and speed is referenced - it is happening quickly....

Latest answer posted November 21, 2009, 8:22 pm (UTC)

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Desert Places

In approaching the analysis of poem, the most important step is in identifying the controlling metaphor. This metaphor is the deadness and spiritlessness of the world that is covered with snow in...

Latest answer posted August 19, 2011, 12:51 am (UTC)

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Desert Places

Robert Frost’s poem “Desert Places” in many ways exemplifies the dark, brooding, somewhat gloomy side of Frost’s poetic character – an aspect of his work that is evident in many poems. And Frost,...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2011, 3:49 am (UTC)

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Desert Places

Robert Frost's poem "Desert Places" is a deceptively simple short poem. In the first four-line stanza, the speaker passes by a snow-covered field. Though the snow covers the field, the speaker...

Latest answer posted February 29, 2016, 7:56 pm (UTC)

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Desert Places

Robert Frost's "Desert Places" is one of his bleakest poems. The first stanza is a description of white snow falling at night covering a field. This combination of white against a black expanse...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2011, 8:10 am (UTC)

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Desert Places

I do no know that this poem is particularly autobiographical or that it refers to a particular person at all. It is primarily written for the reader to identify with, if a common chord is struck....

Latest answer posted December 5, 2008, 2:59 am (UTC)

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Desert Places

This is an interesting poem, where Frost, probably on a walk, looks at a snow-covered field, and how everything his hidden and smothered by the snow. He makes a comparison between this, and...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2009, 10:30 am (UTC)

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