Darkness at Noon Questions and Answers

Darkness at Noon

Darkness at Noon is a fictionalized treatment of the Stalinist purge trials of the late 1930s. An urge to consolidate power and to satisfy his own paranoia led Stalin to turn on many of the "old...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2018, 1:07 am (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

In Darkness at Noon, the first term, anti-vivisection morality, is used during Rubashev's interrogation by Ivanov. The Party operative tells Rubashev that actions should be based on the need to...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2020, 2:24 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Darkness at Noon

No. 1 is meant to be a fictionalized version of Joseph Stalin. When Darkness at Noon was first published in 1940, Stalin was the dictator of the Soviet Union and the undisputed leader of the...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2019, 2:04 pm (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

What is most fascinating about the depiction of totalitarianism in Darkness at Noon, as opposed to in Nineteen Eighty-Four and Brave New World, is that the protagonist is a former supporter of the...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2020, 7:34 pm (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

Arthur Koestler's Darkness at Noon is a sharp denunciation of Stalinism through the story of Nicolas Rubashov, a former Communist official under Lenin who is imprisoned and executed under Stalin's...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2021, 3:12 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Darkness at Noon

Arthur Koestler's novel needs to be understood in the context of the 1917 Russian Revolution and the history of the Soviet Union over the next twenty years. The events of 1917 seemed to give many...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2018, 4:12 pm (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

" ... We seem to be faced with a pendulum movement in history from absolutism to democracy, from democracy back to absolute dictatorship. "The amount of individual freedom which a people may...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2012, 3:10 pm (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

The main thrust of Darkness at Noon concerns the "end-means" debate. The Bolsheviks, represented by the figure of Rubashov, believed that the end justified the means. In other words, they believed...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2020, 8:09 am (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

A totalitarian state is that which is run by one party, or more often, by one person, with little to no individual freedoms or rights. The people are often referred to in the collective (for...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2011, 1:17 am (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

Darkness at Noon is a classic statement, in the form of fiction, of Lord Acton's principle that power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Koestler depicts the situation as it was in...

Latest answer posted April 23, 2020, 1:00 am (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

Although it is never named outright in the novel, Koestler clearly intends the setting of Darkness at Noon to be the Soviet Union. References to the nation's shadowy leader, Number One, are meant...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2020, 12:01 am (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

The "grammatical fiction" is what Rubashov experiences when his individuality defies Party bounds and appears, often when he has a toothache or is daydreaming. The grammatical fiction equates with...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2010, 11:21 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Darkness at Noon

This is Arthur Koestler's fictional history of Stalin’s Russia, and his main purpose is to expose the tragedy of Stalin’s reign.This historical/fictional novel reflects the difficult times during...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2016, 6:11 pm (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

Rubashov is a figure who represents the Old Guard of the Bolsheviks, those who were regarded as having had "pure" motives in the Russian Revolution of 1917. As such he is a hero to those who...

Latest answer posted November 23, 2018, 4:01 pm (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

The repeated mentioning of the "Pince Nez", or eyeglasses that were popular at that time which were supported by pinching the bridge of the nose rather than hooking around the ears seems to be a...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2011, 8:51 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Darkness at Noon

Arthur Koestler's Darkness at Noon was written to reflect his own combined horror at Nazism and disillusionment with communism as it had evolved in Russia under Stalin. The figure of Commissar...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2017, 8:16 pm (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

Darkness at Noon takes place during the 1930s, when Josef Stalin ran the Soviet Union and was conducting a series of bloody purges of his party and his military. The bulk of the dialogue in the...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2010, 12:24 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Darkness at Noon

This novel/play is a thinly disguised criticism of communism, but on another level, it describes the tendency of all Western governments (including capitalism) to deal with abstractions and...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2015, 9:19 pm (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

Within the traditional definition of "motif" as it applies to literature, if we think of a motif as a recurring theme, fragment or event, then Rubashov's eyeglasses (known then as "Pince Nez"...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2011, 12:58 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Darkness at Noon

No. 1 is the fictional representation of USSR leader Joseph Stalin. This leader plays an important role in the novel, although he is entirely behind the scenes. He is the successor to the grand...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2007, 11:57 am (UTC)

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Darkness at Noon

Since Darkness at Noon deals heavily with the concepts of individuality and consciousness, you might do well to select "Consciousness Derived from Material Conditions" by Karl Marx for a...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2010, 11:37 am (UTC)

1 educator answer