Crossing the Bar Questions and Answers

Crossing the Bar

Tennyson's "Crossing the Bar" begins at "Sunset," which is a time of day often used in poetry to symbolize dying or death. Indeed, the sun setting over the horizon, and thus the light of day fading...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2019 8:27 am UTC

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Crossing the Bar

The notion of finality seems to drive Tennyson's work. If there are any moral implications to the poem, it resides in the last stanza. It seems that Tennyson is arguing that one has to be able to...

Latest answer posted January 17, 2010 10:57 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

Alfred Lord Tennyson wrote the very short and poignant poem "Crossing the Bar" in 1889, while on a sea journey soon after he had recovered from a serious illness. The poet sees death as a...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2019 5:11 am UTC

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Crossing the Bar

"Crossing the Bar" focuses on the necessity of confronting life's ups and downs with stoicism and manly honor. This manly honor was perhaps the central component of gentlemanly virtue in the...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2017 6:05 am UTC

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Crossing the Bar

A bar. as the word is used in Tennyson's poem, is the place where a river flows into the ocean. Crossing a bar in either direction is a turbulent experience, especially if it is a big river and a...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2014 10:36 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

Alfred Lord Tennyson’s beautiful poem “Crossing the Bar” relates death to a sea voyage. It is interesting to know that Tennyson requested that this poem be at the end of all of his works of...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2013 11:24 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

In “Crossing the Bar,” Tennyson presents an extended metaphor of the passing from life into death. The poem begins, “Sunset and evening star, / And one clear call for me!” The first line here...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2021 6:13 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

Allegory is defined as any work of literature that, upon interpretation, reveals a deeper—and often moral or political—meaning. In order to answer your question, it’s important to understand that...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2019 4:22 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

The speaker provides a theme of death as a journey. He likens the venture as traveling on the sea, hoping to eventually meet the Pilot of his life when he crosses over "the bar." There is also a...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2020 12:28 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

In the poem "Crossing the Bar" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, death is compared to a ship putting out to sea. Often at the mouth of a harbor or a river, the movement of water by the tide or other means...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2021 5:52 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

The poet's attitude to death in "Crossing the Bar" might be described as calm, but with a certain quiet sense of anticipation and optimism. He seems to regard death as an adventure. The poem opens...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2019 12:57 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

In the first stanza, the speaker announces he will be going on some voyage ("out to sea"). He notes (to himself and perhaps the reader) that he will not moan about the "bar" as he leaves on this...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2016 10:14 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

I think that Tennyson understood the overall significance of the poem to request that it be included in his last collection and that it is the poem to conclude all of his collections of poetry....

Latest answer posted May 5, 2012 6:12 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

In the literal interpretation of the poem, this refers to the tide. The preceding two lines also refer to the tide, noting that it is "too full for sound and foam." In these lines, the speaker...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2019 5:22 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

The most obvious comparison between Alfred Tennyson's "Crossing the Bar" and Robert Frost's "Once by the Pacific" is that both of them deal with water, specifically the sea. Of course, Frost's sea...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2014 6:05 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

"Crossing the Bar" is a poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. He wrote the poem during an illness and while at sea; he claimed that the words "came in a moment," and asked his son to place the poem at the...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2012 9:17 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

"Crossing the Bar" uses various metaphors to convey the speaker's feelings about dying. Thus, the "bar" referenced in these lines is actually represented in the title as well. The poem utilizes...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2021 6:36 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

When discussing diction in poetry, we are looking for a range of ways in which the poet uses words to construct an experience and advance a view of the world or of the human experience. Because...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2019 7:46 pm UTC

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Crossing the Bar

In "Crossing the Bar," Tennyson describes the process of passing from life to death, and he uses as a metaphor for this process the speaker's journey out to sea. The "Bar" from the title refers to...

Latest answer posted May 8, 2021 10:56 am UTC

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Crossing the Bar

Today, as in Tennyson's time, most people fear death. That is if they think about death at all, which most people don't do for the obvious reason that it's all rather depressing to contemplate the...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2021 6:09 am UTC

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Crossing the Bar

What options/perspectives are you considering? I'm not sure there is more than one perspective about death, at least not in the sense that I interpret your question to mean. It's not like Tennyson...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2009 3:02 am UTC

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