The Count of Monte Cristo Questions and Answers

The Count of Monte Cristo

Dantes' stop at Elba sets off the rest of the novel. He stopped in order to exchange letters between his captain and Napoleon, per the request of his dying captain, not knowing that such an...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2007, 6:08 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo Top Ten Quotes 1) Count: "Tell the angel who will watch over your life to pray now and then for a man who, like Satan, believed himself for an instant to be equal to God,...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2007, 2:06 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Edmond Dantès believes that the sins of the father shall be visited upon the son, but he does not follow this to the letter. As you have suggested, the Count of Monte Cristo (Dantès) chooses not to...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2012, 1:14 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In the novel, The Count of Monte Cristo, there were four things the enemies of Dantes wanted for themselves. 1) Fernand was in love with Dantes' fiance, Mercedes, and wanted her for himself....

Latest answer posted July 11, 2012, 9:03 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Albert implies that Lucien has been manipulating stocks, and in his embarrassment, Lucien leaves, claiming he felt "ill at ease." The Count then suggests he will arrange a dinner party...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2008, 6:09 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

After Dantes is rescued by the Italian pirates, he wins the confidence of the skipper, who discusses with Edmund the possibility of obtaining Turkish treasure from another ship. The neutral ground...

Latest answer posted September 23, 2008, 8:45 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In the chapter (49) entitled "Ideology," of The Count of Monte Cristo, Monte Cristo has a rather intimate encounter with de Villefort in which he accuses de Villefort, "Do you really think that...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2010, 3:33 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count asks Haydee not to tell anyone about her parentage if she chooses to leave him. Although he introduces her to society as his slave, the Count is more than happy to allow Haydee to live...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2019, 7:04 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In "The Count of Monte Cristo," Haydee is the person who would be "happy to never leave" the Count. The daughter of Ali Pasha, she was sold into slavery after her father was...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2008, 2:43 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

After meeting Sinbad the Sailor on the isle of Monte Cristo and spending a drug-induced night, the Baron Franz d'Epinay arrives in Rome at Carnival time in order to join his friend, Viscount Albert...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2011, 9:56 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

An interesting question. Certainly the high level of adventure in this work might lead one to think maybe there is none. However, we can draw moral lessons in at least two areas from The Count of...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2007, 9:44 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

I don't know that I can get to all three, but one that certainly fits the bill is the way that he abuses Monsieur de Villefort. This man is a prosecutor, a politician and a reasoning man. He is...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2010, 2:59 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Both Eugénie and Valentine yearn for the freedom to choose how they live their own lives, yet each woman attempts to achieve this goal in a different way. The obedient Valentine shuns the notion of...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2010, 9:31 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Edmund Dantes- the original character, best friend to Fernand and engaged to Mercedes the priest Abbe Busconi- this is after Dantes is out of prison and he encounters Fernand, but does not want to...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2007, 9:44 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The betrothal feast in chapter 5 is for Dantes (the hero of the story) and Mercedes. In the middle of the feast Dantes is arrested as a result of the plot against him.

Latest answer posted November 16, 2008, 3:12 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The two meet in Rome and "run into each other" several times. The most significant occasion occurs when Albert is "kidnapped" by bandits at the carnival. Monte Cristo pays the...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2008, 2:21 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo knows that he can always count on the absolute loyalty of his servant Bertuccio. It was the count who gave him a job when Bertuccio was released from prison, so Bertuccio...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2018, 8:08 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

When Dantes is imprisoned in The Count of Monte Cristo, he spends eight years in the company of and learning from Abbe Faria, an Italian priest. As they work together to dig an escape tunnel,...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2019, 7:23 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Have you read the analysis of this novel here on eNotes? It gives you an excellent overview of what this novel is about. It is an interesting and fast-paced adventure story that also has important...

Latest answer posted August 4, 2010, 12:16 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

What makes Edmond such a fascinating, complex character is that at various points in the story he entertains doubts about exacting such terrible revenge on his enemies. One such example comes in...

Latest answer posted October 20, 2018, 7:19 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

At first reading, The Count of Monte Cristo seems a novel of revenge, but upon a second reading, one realizes that while Emund Dantes does exact retribution upon his enemies, a main theme is one of...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2010, 11:59 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In The Count of Monte Cristo, Albert is the son of the man who betrayed Edmund Dantes in order to marry his girl. Albert does not realize that his father set up Dantes to be sent to prison and...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2012, 7:04 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

One reason that Count Monte Cristo (Edmond Dantes) says that the worst thing Albert will suffer is fear is because de Monte Cristo recognizes the goodness in Albert, whose mother, after all, is the...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2010, 3:11 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

One element of the story that does not fit the usual pattern in some ways, is the fact that at a certain point, Edmond questions his divine (previously assumed) right to revenge for his wrongful...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2010, 2:50 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

There are a number of people that the Count helps, so perhaps by detailing a few I will be able to answer your question. One is his former employer, Monseiur Morrel. Monte Christo pays off his...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2010, 2:54 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Alexandre Dumas' "The Count of Monte Cristo" is considered a classic for the same reason many other books are considered classics: it has stood the test of time. Completed in 1844, the novel has...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2013, 1:23 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Abbe Faria helps him realize that he has been set up. Villefort is using this situation to win over the King. Dante realizes that he must revenge this betrayal.

Latest answer posted November 9, 2007, 11:41 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In Chapter 90 of The Count of Monte Cristo, it is the night before his duel with Albert de Morcerf, who has challenged him for dishonoring his father's reputation by exposing the criminal acts of...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2010, 9:11 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Dantes is so angry toward the people who unjustly sent him to prison, he becomes consumed with seeking revenge, believing that making them suffer is providential. In the years that it takes for...

Latest answer posted September 12, 2007, 2:15 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Dangars wants to marry his daughter to someone wealthy so he can then get the money to solve his financial problems from that family through her. First he wants her to marry Albert de Morcerf,...

Latest answer posted October 6, 2007, 8:30 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Valentine’s grandfather Noritier reveals a secret document, the “Minutes of a Sitting of the Bonapartist Club....February the fifth, eighteen-fifteen,” which he requests Franz, Valentine’s...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2008, 2:06 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

What Edmond Dantes considers to be justice, most other people would call revenge. Edmond undeniably suffers more than his share of misfortune, beginning with being erroneously accused and...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2019, 6:40 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The ship-owner, Monsieur Morrel, has just given Edmond captaincy of the Pharaon, a position he will take up on the ship's next voyage. It's a sign of how much regard Morrel has for Edmond's skills...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2019, 6:37 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

This question is very difficult because the precise wording depends upon the translation. However, in the Barnes and Nobles Classic Edition, that line is used in Chapter 40: "I could have delivered...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2007, 5:51 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Alexandre Dumas's novel, The Count of Monte Cristo, is the romantic tale of an ingenuous young man caught in events that are beyond his ken. Not only is his naivete dangerous to him, but his...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2010, 1:51 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Revenge, of course, drives all of Edmond Dante's actions after he is falsely imprisoned. It keeps him alive in prison, gives him strength and motivation to carry out his elaborate strategy to...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2010, 7:15 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

After being framed and spending years in an incredibly desolate prison, Dantes's humanity eventually seeps out of him. His thoughts are filled only with exacting divine justice on those who have...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2019, 7:53 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Before he was a Count, Edmund was also a sailor; we can assume Gaetano was on the Count’s payroll and would suggest to Franz, who was interested in hunting, to try his luck on the Isle of Monte...

Latest answer posted May 18, 2008, 12:50 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The tablets are actually mentioned in chapters 34 and 35. The tablets are "hung up at the corners of streets the evening before an execution" and provide details as to the names and crimes of those...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2019, 7:08 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

After the it lands, Dantes “looks after the ship,” and dresses it as in “mourning” because of the death of Captain Leclere. He then “spring[s] out on the quay and disappear[s] in the midst of the...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2007, 8:16 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Fernand Mondego, the sneaky fisherman, betrays Dantès to the authorities because he wants Edmond's fiancee, Mercédès, for himself. Mondego is generously rewarded for his betrayal, eventually...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2019, 8:59 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Monte Cristo begins the story full of hope and optimism, seeing the world as an essentially good place and people as essentially moral. When he is betrayed, his views swing violently in the...

Latest answer posted November 12, 2007, 9:24 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Through the intrigue and suspense of the book, the idea of a truly great man runs afoul of greed, dishonesty, and treachery. The Count himself, despite his need for vengeance, is presented as a...

Latest answer posted December 27, 2012, 10:01 pm (UTC)

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