The Count of Monte Cristo Questions and Answers

The Count of Monte Cristo

In Dumas's The Count of Monte Cristo, Albert de Morcerf is son to Fernand Mondego—the Count de Morcerf—and Mercédès, who was Edmond Dantès' former sweetheart. In Chapter 37, Albert has been taken...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2016, 10:38 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The moral of a story is the lesson that a reader can learn from the story or characters and apply to life. All throughout Dumas' The Count of Monte Cristo, Dantes evolves. He goes from a young,...

Latest answer posted October 8, 2016, 10:29 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The Cavalcantis are imposters, whom the Count of Monte Cristo is using to get revenge against Villefort. Major Cavalcanti is supposed to be the wealthy and noble Italian father of “Count” or...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2008, 3:26 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In Alexander Dumas’ 1844 novel The Count of Monte Cristo, Edmond Dantes has suffered betrayal of the worst kind, and paid a price in bondage under horrible conditions that have no place in...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2013, 3:07 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The sea is the cemetery of the Chateau D’If because that is where the bodies of dead prisoners are sent. Faria does not go in, because Dantes switches places with him when the guards aren't...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2015, 4:29 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Danglars and avarice As a young man, Danglars, who is a disliked purser on the Pharaon, and is envious of the first mate, Edmund Dantes, who takes over when the captain dies at sea. It is this envy...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2009, 2:41 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

After he escapes from the Château d’If, Edmond Dantes will need to forge a new identity, and not content with one disguise, he chooses five different ones: Abbé Busoni, a clerk of the house of...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2020, 11:07 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

This question can be answered in two ways. First, when it comes to setting from a temporal point of view, the story takes place during the time of the decline of Napoleon's empire. More precisely,...

Latest answer posted August 4, 2015, 1:59 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Edmond Dantès exacts revenge on Fernand Mondego by destroying his reputation, which in turn leads to his family turning their backs on him. Mondego's son, Albert, is engaged to be married to...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2018, 4:16 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

To disabuse the error of the question, in the setting of "The Count of Monte Cristo," Louis XVIII sits on the throne in what history records as "The One Hundred Days," France having been restored...

Latest answer posted October 3, 2009, 3:18 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Mercedes marries Fernand so her husband Albert will have a father. This is a story about revenge, but Mercedes is an innocent party. She was supposed to marry Dantes right before he got hauled off...

Latest answer posted October 11, 2015, 7:54 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Perhaps the most salient symbol in "The Count of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas is the little red purse that originally belongs to Edmund Dantes father. This purse originally contained money...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2009, 2:16 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

One of the objects of Dumas's withering scorn in The Count of Monte Cristo is the rigid social hierarchy of contemporary France. According to prevailing social values, it was considered...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2018, 6:40 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In chapter 35 of The Count of Monte Cristo , by Alexandre Dumas, we find the Count entering Albert's apartments as per hisrequest. In the process of the conversation, the topic of European...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2011, 12:45 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The wicked Fernand Mondego is Edmond Dantès's main antagonist. He is deeply jealous of Dantès for winning the heart of his cousin Mercedes, for whom he has unrequited feelings. Mondego knows that...

Latest answer posted February 23, 2020, 10:40 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

For all that they've been through a lot together, Edmond feels that he cannot marry Mercedes, the woman he'd loved for so long. Primarily, this is because he no longer harbors the same feelings for...

Latest answer posted February 2, 2019, 10:55 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Haydee, spoken of by Monte Cristo to de Villefort as his "slave," first appears in Chapter 47 of Dumas's great novel. As the "lovely Greek" who has been the Count's companion in Italy, Haydee is...

Latest answer posted June 2, 2012, 4:39 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

There is no question that Fernand Mondego wishes ill upon Edmond Dantes. From their first encounter in the home of Fernand’s cousin, Mercedes, who loves Edmond but who is persistently wooed by...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2014, 2:32 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo purchases Haydee from a slave trader. She is a princess and was the daughter of Ali Pasha. Her father was betrayed by the Count de Morcef. The Count was supposed to be...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2011, 4:17 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

After taking leave of Albert and his family, Monte Cristo purchases a summerhouse in Auteuil. The summerhouse was once the site of Villefort and Madame Danglars's affair and is where they...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2010, 7:14 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Three ways in which Edmund Dantès is enabled to become the Count of Monte Cristo develop from the following: Edmund Dantès is arrested because of the treachery of his fiancée's cousin and his...

Latest answer posted August 17, 2016, 11:53 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In the chapter entitled "The Betrothal Feast," old Dante's father remarks, "What a silent party!" and his son replies that he is too happy to be joyous because at times joy oppresses just as much...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2011, 3:01 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Both Catalans, Mercedes and Ferdinand Mondego are cousins. Ferdinand is desirous of Mercedes and jealous of Edmund Dantes. Mercedes and Ferdinand are descended from Spanish and Moorish sailors who...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2016, 8:57 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Shortly after his return to life from the Chateau d'If, Edmund Dantes, disguised as an abbe, pays a visit to Caderousse at the Pont du Gard Inn where he presents the innkeeper with a huge diamond...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2009, 3:07 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

A complex character of Alexandre Dumas's tale of revenge and redemption, Edmund Dantes exhibits certain saliet traits: INGENUOUS In the opening chapters of The Count of Monte Cristo, Edmund Dantes...

Latest answer posted August 27, 2010, 9:31 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Jacopo is best described as loyalty, and his loyalty is vital to the development of Dantes' character and to the themes. Dantes' faith in humanity has been demolished by his experiences. Meeting...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2007, 12:00 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

I encourage my students to create a key for the important themes and characters in a book and then to use that key to annotate the outer margins as they read. So, for example, when reading The...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2019, 9:38 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

When Dantes leaves prison, his primary goal is revenge, and he proceeds to accomplish his objective by punishing those responsible for his imprisonment one by one. Unfortunately, however, Eduoard...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2007, 3:22 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

There may be more than two answers to this question but I think the characters you are referring to are Mercedes, Dante's former fiance and Mercedes, the Count de Morcerf, wife. Her spirit was...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2007, 9:08 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In the exposition of "The Count of Monte Cristo," the setting is Marseille, France, in the south of the country on the Mediterranean coast. The prison, the Chateau d'If, is off this...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2008, 11:44 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The historical setting plays a crucial role in the development of the subplots, main plot, and themes of The Count of Monte Cristo. Several of the characters' lives are tied inextricably to the...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2012, 5:59 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Villeforte wants Valentine (his daughter from his first marriage) to marry the Baron Franz d'Epinay. This union is not motivated by love, but by Villefort's personal political gains and Valentine's...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2016, 7:51 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In "The Count of Monte Cristo" the atmosphere, or mood/tone fluctuates beginning with the foreboding tone of the first chapters as Edmund Dantes returns in the merchant ship on which the...

Latest answer posted September 23, 2008, 8:24 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

With Innocence and Revenge and the Strength of Love as dominant in this work, here are some passages: 1. The young first mate of the Pharaon returns to Marseille with its cargo. His assumption of...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2010, 8:44 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The wicked Fernand Mondego has always lusted after Edmond's fiancee Mercedes. Determined to have her, he hatches a truly diabolical scheme that involves framing Edmond as a traitor. Once Edmond's...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2018, 8:56 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

A symbol is defined in the following way: A symbol is something that represents an idea, a physical entity or a process but is distinct from it. The purpose of a symbol is to communicate meaning....

Latest answer posted September 1, 2012, 5:57 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Bertuccio had once attempted to murder someone at the house in Auteuil. Bertuccio's brother, who had been a soldier in Napoleon’s army, was murdered by royalist assassins in the city of Nîmes....

Latest answer posted July 28, 2010, 6:30 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

This incident occurs in Chapter 45 and 46 of Le Comte de Monte Cristo/The Count of Monte Cristo. In this chapter and in Chapter 46, Bertuccio gives his history to the Count of Monte Cristo in the...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2010, 11:31 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

"The Count of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas employs the historical backdrop of the exiled emperor, Napoleon Bonaparte, the One Hundred Days in which the monarchy was restored, and the attempts...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2009, 1:54 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In his efforts to be the Providential paraclete, Edmund Dantes assumes a number of disguises, the most prominent of which is that of the Count of Monte Cristo. Here are his other disguises: Sinbad...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2010, 11:41 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In Chapter 89 of The Count of Monte Cristo, the Count returns home from the opera where Albert de Morcerf has challenged him to a duel because the charges of betraying Ali Tebelin, ally of France,...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2012, 5:27 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In an abridged edition of Alexandre Dumas's The Count of Monte Cristo, the presence of Ferdinand Mondego is felt mostly in the beginning chapters. For, he forms the third part of the classic love...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2014, 7:56 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

Well, I have a few of my own favorites. One is when Abbe Faria and Edmond are digging and Edmond tells the Abbe: "I don't believe in God," and Faria replies, "It doesn't matter, he believes in...

Latest answer posted November 9, 2010, 4:38 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

I am seized with a cataleptic fit....When you seeme motionless, cold, and all appearances dead, then and not until then force my teeth apart with the knife, and pour eight to ten drops of the...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2009, 10:59 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

In the opening chapter we discover that Edmond Dantès made an unscheduled stop on the island of Elba during his most recent voyage. He went there to fulfill the dying wish of his captain to deliver...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2019, 10:47 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The political climate of the setting of The Count of Monte Cristo is intrinsic to the plot of Dumas's narrative. For, it is the exile of Napoleon Bonaparte which proves to be the nemesis of Edmund...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2011, 4:28 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

The term "classic" can sometimes be overused or applied too liberally. For this writer, a classic is a well-crafted work which remains entertaining and/or relevant despite its age. With that...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2019, 5:28 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

On the 24th of February, 1815, the look-out at Notre-Dame de la Garde signaled the three-master, the Pharaon from Smyrna, Trieste, and Naples. (The Count of Monte Christo, book 1, chapter 1) The...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2019, 7:25 pm (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

This story uses two symbols that are common in literature. One is water or the sea. In literature, water is often symbolic of a cleansing or rebirth. By entering the sea after prison, Dantes is...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2011, 8:20 am (UTC)

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The Count of Monte Cristo

This is a difficult hypothetical to explore and certainly one that would be completely subject to the interpretation of the reader. During his time in the dread fortress, the Chateau d'If, Dantes...

Latest answer posted January 2, 2020, 7:15 pm (UTC)

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