Questions and Answers for The Convergence of the Twain

The Convergence of the Twain

Explain the theme of Thomas Hardy's poem "The Convergence of the Twain."

Most people at the time thought that the sinking of the Titanic was an appalling tragedy involving the senseless loss of innocent life. If Thomas Hardy felt the same way, then there's no sign of it...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2017 8:17 am UTC

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The Convergence of the Twain

Explain the theme of Thomas Hardy's poem "The Convergence of the Twain."

The powerful role of fate is one of the major themes of Thomas Hardy's poem "Convergence of the Twain." Written originally as a response to the sinking of the Titanic, Hardy's poem suggests that...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2012 7:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Convergence of the Twain

What is a good thesis for the poem ''The convergence of the twain''?

I usually find that a good rule for creating thesis statements about poems is to fill in this sentence: In ["Poem's Title,"] [Author's Name] uses [literary device], [literary device], and [literary...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2016 6:31 pm UTC

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The Convergence of the Twain

How does Thomas Hardy memorably respond to the sinking of the Titanic in "The Convergence of the Twain"?

In "The Convergence of the Twain," Thomas Hardy memorably responds to the sinking of the Titanic by suggesting that it was the inevitable result of our human pride and vanity. First, the title...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2016 8:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Convergence of the Twain

What historic event might "The Convergence of the Twain" be referring to? Whose fault was it, according to the poet?...

As Thomas Hardy himself alludes to in part of the poem's title ("Lines on the loss of the Titanic"), the poem is about the doomed and "unsinkable" cruise liner the Titanic. Hardy places the blame...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2020 7:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Convergence of the Twain

What is the theme of 'The Convergence of the Twain'?

To answer this question you need to understand Hardy's own philosophy of life and how he viewed events and tragedies such as the sinking of the Titanic, which is the concern of this poem. What is...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2011 12:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Convergence of the Twain

In the Thomas Hardy poem, "The Convergence of the Twain", why is the ship described as "prepared for a sinister mate"...

In the poem, "The Convergence of the Twain", published in 1915, and commemorating the sinking of the luxury ocean liner Titanic three years before, Thomas Hardy gives free reign to his...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2011 4:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Convergence of the Twain

According to the poem "Convergence of the Twain," what caused the Titanic to sink?

The primary cause of the ship's damage is an iceberg, which the poet describes as A Shape of Ice, for the time fat and dissociate However, in the poet's mind, the convergence of the ice and the...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2009 3:26 am UTC

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The Convergence of the Twain

How might Thomas Hardy's poem "The Convergence of the Twain" relate to Hardy's own marriage?

Thomas Hardy’s marriage to his first wife, Emma, is a famously paradoxical relationship. Although they seem to have been genuinely in love at first, they grew increasingly distant and estranged as...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2012 5:46 am UTC

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The Convergence of the Twain

In Thomas Hardy's poem, "The Convergence of the Twain", why is the ship described as "prepared"?

The ship (the Titanic) is not being described as prepared. The line makes logical sense when it is taken with the last line of the previous stanza, where there is no ending punctuation after...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2015 2:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Convergence of the Twain

What historic event might "The Convergence of the Twain" be referring to? Whose fault was it according to the poet?...

Throughout the poem, fate is personified as an omnipotent and malevolent force. In the sixth stanza, the speaker refers to fate as the "Immanent Will that stirs and urges everything." Fate...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2020 8:02 am UTC

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The Convergence of the Twain

What in the poem might lead us to conclude that the poem has an exceptionally grim way of understanding the fate of...

In "The Convergence of the Twain," by Thomas Hardy, the Titanic's ultimate destination is first described: the ship is at the bottom of the sea, where the jewels and the mirrors are scarcely...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2011 7:17 am UTC

1 educator answer