illustrated profile of a man and an armored knight connected by two overlapping circles with a fortress skyline below them

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

by Mark Twain
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A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court Questions and Answers

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court by Mark Twain tells the story of a Yankee who finds himself in the the time of King Arthur and, through the use of his wit, as well as knowledge of the...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2019, 4:25 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

One of the central themes of this hilarioius, but also quite sad and tragic, novel is the idea that technology can improve the world and bring it out of darkness and free it from superstition. This...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2013, 5:53 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Hello-Central is the very odd name of the daughter of Sandy and the Boss. We learn the child's name in chapter 40; in chapter 41, we find out why she has this name:"The name of one who was...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2008, 3:23 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

"Hello-Central" is a reference to a nineteenth-century telephone operator. Sandy chooses to give this somewhat bizarre name to her daughter because she hears her husband, Hank, use the phrase in...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2011, 7:18 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

At the end of the book, Hank realizes that he's as much a subject to human nature as anybody else. He had succeeded in transforming the knights from mere fighting machines into men who worked for...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2008, 2:20 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

The irony in this situation is that Merlin was beaten so many times by Hank Morgan with his Yankee ingenuity, and yet at the end, Merlin is the one able to put Morgan into the sleep that took him...

Latest answer posted December 19, 2007, 6:11 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

In Mark Twain's satirical novel A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, the characters of Morgan le Faye and Hank Morgan share a number of similarities, despite their very different natures....

Latest answer posted July 22, 2010, 4:24 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Hank found the people of Camelot to be superstitious and gullible. In their naivete, he found it easy to con them into believing he possessed magical powers. Once he won over King Arthur and the...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2007, 12:30 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Twain thinks of nobility as little better than animals themselves, as they sleep well on the ground with the critters and "as for a bath, probably neither she nor any other noble in the land had...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2015, 4:27 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

The answer to this question comes in Chapter 22, entitled "The Holy Fountain." In this chapter the Abbot begs Hank to help fix the fountain, but when he hears that Merlin is already working on this...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2010, 7:46 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

In Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Hank continually works toward specific goal: if he cannot return to the nineteenth century, he will make the sixth century like the...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2010, 4:27 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

It is towards the end of this tale that we find the answer to your question and Clarence reveals his plans for the royal family of the new republic Hank wishes to form. Initially, he wishes to have...

Latest answer posted December 1, 2010, 5:15 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

The quote that you are referring to comes in the second chapter of this highly amusing story. Hank, having been transported back to Arthurian times, still doesn't know where he is or in what time,...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2010, 7:23 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

A framing narrative is a story that "frames" the main story in a book. So, literally, there is a story within a story. This technique is used in works such as Turn of the Screw by Henry James and...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2009, 8:15 am (UTC)

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A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Hank Morgan, a modern man from Connecticut, finds the sport of jousting and the other ways of doing battle absolutely inane. He describes how the knights don all their armor and are cruelly...

Latest answer posted December 1, 2010, 9:07 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

While one can look at the obvious in reference to the bullet in the armor, it more subtly foreshadows he demise of that which some deem to be indestructable. Armor is seen as being a way to...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2007, 12:35 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Hank Morgan is trying to undermine the nobles in part because he thinks they are power hungry and that they are fooling the people into obeying them (with talk of things like divine right and...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2011, 11:10 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

It is Chapter Twenty-Two where you can find the answer to this question. When the Abbot sees that Hank has arrived, he is overjoyed at having a "magician" whose magic has already shown itself to be...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2011, 6:51 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is a famous novel by Mark Twain, published in 1889, and considered one of his great works of satire. Hank, the protagonist, is a modern man who finds...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2012, 1:40 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

I have had to edit your question slightly to make it fit enotes regulations. We need to remember the context of this small episode to consider how Twain uses this section of the novel. The part you...

Latest answer posted December 1, 2010, 5:22 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

In Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Hank continually works toward specific goal: if he cannot return to the nineteenth century, he will make the sixth century like the...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2010, 8:26 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

I appreciate this customary example of Mark Twain's humour and biting satire, whilst at the same time recognising the presentation and critique of serious social issues such as the hanging of the...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2010, 3:52 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

I think that you would say that this is false. The actual duel (or tournament) is between Morgan and Sir Sagramore. However, you can look at it as a duel between Morgan and Merlin. Morgan says...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2010, 1:38 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

As you say, Hank Morgan says he doesn't like tournaments but tends to go to watch them even so. Also as you say, he gives two reasons. First, he says he pretty much has to do it because he's a...

Latest answer posted December 6, 2009, 5:30 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

You can find this answer in Chapter 21. Now, it never says what the monks themselves believe, but you can certainly infer that they believe it. The story says that as soon as they bathed, the...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2010, 10:26 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

In Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Hank continually works toward specific goal: if he cannot return to the nineteenth century, he will make the sixth century like the...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2010, 4:04 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

The most salient difference between Hank and the nobles is that Hank is from a more advanced society and has a knowledge of technology that is unknown to anyone else. Ironically, his knowledge of...

Latest answer posted November 28, 2010, 2:08 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

This section of the novel comes as Hank and King Arthur decide to tour England in disguise to see the lives of the populace in action. They are surprised by the injustice and horrible acts that...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2011, 7:38 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Another way Hank tries to undermine the knights is to do away with the tournament. He hates the chivalric code and everything to do with it. So he tries to get the knights to play baseball instead...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2008, 7:34 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

We can clearly deduce Hank's thoughts about armour and its use in Chapter 39, when he has his duel with Sir Sagramor. Key to discerning this inference is the comparison with how Sir Sagramor and...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2010, 7:31 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

The event you refer to happens in Chapter 39 of this immensely funny novel. Hank and Sir Sagramor have a tournament, and as they move to meet each other in their first "clash," Hank comments that...

Latest answer posted December 1, 2010, 7:34 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Hank Morgan, a man skilled in the manufacture of firearms, was the superintendent of a firearms factory of about two thousand employees.

Latest answer posted October 27, 2009, 7:02 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Mark Twain did an excellent job of contrasting the real, gritty England of the early medieval era with what everyone pictures when they think of Camelot and King Arthur. The England that Hank...

Latest answer posted August 19, 2008, 1:18 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

The story certainly is a tall tale. As much as I'd love to time travel, we haven't discovered how to do it yet.There are actually two postscripts in this book. The first was written by Clarence,...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2008, 11:16 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

At first Hank feels that King Arthur is too confident and oblivious to what is going on in his own country. King Arthur is even unaware of his wife's affair with Sir Launcelot. Hank feels that King...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2008, 5:44 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

There are various opinions regarding Twain's purpose in writing A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. Some would say that Twain was once again demonstrating his mastery of the writing of...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2011, 7:15 am (UTC)

1 educator answer