A Clean, Well-Lighted Place Questions and Answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The word "nada" in the story stands for the nothingness that the waiter who is not in a hurry fears. He understands the old man's desire to drink in a clean, well-lighted place, though the old man...

Latest answer posted December 7, 2017, 1:05 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

"A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" by Ernest Hemingway was first published in the March 1933 issue of Scribner’s Magazine. It has three characters, an older waiter, a younger waiter, and a customer, who...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2016, 10:53 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The tone of "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" by American writer Ernest Hemingway is a matter-of-fact, direct tone. It is an unbiased reporting by Hemingway of this story stored in his mind, as if it...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2015, 9:12 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The short story "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" by Ernest Hemingway is deceptively simple. It tells of two waiters in a café who are serving an old man, the only customer, late at night. The younger...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2021, 2:07 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

At the beginning of Ernest Hemingway's "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," the two waiters are discussing the old man's suicide attempt. It is then that they see the soldier. A girl and a soldier went...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2019, 11:08 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Using Hemingway's own words, the young waiter is "the waiter who was in a hurry," while the old waiter is the "unhurried waiter." That is, the young waiter exists in the present tense of his youth;...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2011, 2:37 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Darkness in this short story symbolizes despair while light, especially when accompanied by cleanliness and order, symbolizes a refuge from the chaos and nothingness ("nada") of the universe. In...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2020, 2:25 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The old waiter likes to keep the cafe open until late at night because it provides a refuge or safe haven for people against the nothingness and darkness of the outer world. It is quiet, without...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2017, 12:47 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In Hemingway's iconography, good places are clean and filled with light. We see this in "The Snows of Kilimanjaro," as well, when Harry dreams he is taken to the mountaintop, where he is at peace,...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2019, 12:45 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The climax of "A Clean Well-Lighted Place" is as quiet and subtle as the story itself. Throughout the story, the young waiter wants to close the cafe early, while the older waiter wants to remain...

Latest answer posted April 11, 2009, 7:17 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Each of the three characters in "A Clean Well-Lighted Place" by Ernest Hemingway is in a different stage of life: the young waiter, the older waiter, and the old man. As in any work, several...

Latest answer posted August 2, 2013, 6:15 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The older waiter says to the younger, "we are of two different kinds," this establishes the most obvious conflict. The younger waiter is more selfish, 'in a hurry,' and the older waiter is more...

Latest answer posted December 13, 2009, 6:53 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The famous short story "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" by Ernest Hemingway tells of an old man who sits late at a cafe drinking brandy and the two waiters who serve him. One of the waiters is young...

Latest answer posted August 11, 2019, 7:33 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The title of Ernest Hemingway's short story, "A Clean Well-Lighted Place," on the surface refers to the old man's preference of the night life available in the town. Unlike the younger waiter, who...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2011, 3:15 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In Hemingway's "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," that is what one can hope for: a clean, well-lighted place like the little cafe. The story presents a realistic--some might say bleak--picture of...

Latest answer posted May 16, 2010, 11:45 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The young waiter is impatient, selfish, arrogant, and judgmental; he also is hateful in his treatment of the old man who drinks alone on the terrace. He wants only to close early so that he can go...

Latest answer posted May 9, 2009, 6:27 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

This is a broad topic as semantic analysis can take many avenues of consideration, though some are more relevant to literature. Semantic analysis follows parsing, which describes language, we'll...

Latest answer posted June 5, 2012, 11:01 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Even though the two waiters understand that the old man is lonely and has recently attempted suicide, the younger waiter remains unsympathetic. He himself, he says, would not want to be that old;...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2018, 2:35 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In Ernest Hemingway’s short story “A Clean Well-Lighted Place,” the older waiter, at the end of the story, contemplates a personal version of the Lord’s Prayer that emphasizes the idea of...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2011, 2:12 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

My thesis would be that this is a story about human empathy versus human indifference. Hemingway comes down on the side of human empathy. The world may be a meaningless place that crushes people,...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2019, 2:39 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," Hemingway uses his sparse prose to evoke imagery of a warm, welcoming café in the darkness. One motif he uses in multiple ways throughout this story is light. When...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2020, 4:36 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The older waiter has wisdom and experience whereas the younger waiter is selfish, inexperienced and dismissive of the old man. The older waiter understands that the old man needs this simple and...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2015, 2:09 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Hemingway is often referred to as a minimalist; his understated manner of expression in objective and terse prose characterizes his desire to describe without frills, and without the imposition of...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2009, 3:18 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

This story is set in a cafe late at night—or, more specifically, at a little after two o'clock in the morning. An old man sits at a table in the otherwise empty terrace of the cafe "in the shadow...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2019, 9:41 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Hemingway is presenting in "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" a picture of existential nihilism and arguing against nihilism while acknowledging the truth of existentialism. The older waiter is the...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2012, 3:39 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Modernist writing rejected the Victorian and Edwardian omniscient, or all-knowing, narrator, believing that this form of narration did not accurately reflect a reality in which knowledge is...

Latest answer posted February 6, 2020, 2:54 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

"A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" is one of Hemingway's works of fiction which is set in Spain. In most of these works the dialogue is in English, but he wrote the dialogue in such a way that the...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2016, 12:40 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In "A Clean Well-Lighted Place," Hemingway quickly establishes a dichotomy between the two waiters. Although it is not clear from the text who says what in the first piece of dialogue (since the...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2020, 1:29 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Ernest Hemingway explores several themes in his short story "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place." LOYALTY AND SOLIDARITY. The two old men--the waiter and his customer--share this common bond. The waiter...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2011, 6:58 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In this story, a young waiter with a wife at home is anxious for the last patron in the cafe, a very old man, to leave. The young waiter wants to close the cafe so that he can go home. The older...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2020, 6:25 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The most important theme in this story relates to humankind's despair. It is an existential theme of Man against Nature, as existential despair is the result of the nature of life, the nature of...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2012, 1:18 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The word "nada" or nothing is inserted by the waiter into the Lord's Prayer to turn it into a kind of existentialist parody. The older waiter in the story personifies the story's general theme of...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2018, 8:24 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In Hemingway's "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" (1933), three characters—the young and old waiters and the drunken old man—represent three different stages of attachment to the world. The young...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2019, 5:04 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Perhaps Ernest Hemingway, in his unstated way, merely portrays the young waiter as the typical youth who is so full of life and the desires of life that he does not yet recognize the void and the...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2011, 8:58 am (UTC)

6 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

To clarify, there are three characters in the story, two of whom are older than the young waiter. Hemingway's "old man" is a deaf patron of the cafe who stays late to drink alone on the terrace....

Latest answer posted March 1, 2009, 3:55 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Nihilism is part of the spirit of modernism. Victorian fiction seldom questions the essential meaning or purpose of life, whereas the literary fiction of the twentieth century does so all the time....

Latest answer posted April 22, 2021, 11:03 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

This is in respect to the ways the three characters deal with uncertainty and what they have to live for. The old man drinks his sorrows away to forget the void in his life: the “nada.” He has...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2010, 1:32 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In Hemingway's "A Clean Well-Lighted Place," the fact that the man is deaf indicates that he is even more isolated from people. This deafness and age of the man may also indicate that he is losing...

Latest answer posted August 23, 2009, 7:54 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

It is always the opening sentences that set the style of well written literature. In this case, the opening sentences include the narration and dialogue as in this excerpt from the opening...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2012, 2:15 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

One symbol is the absence of the cafe. In other words, this absence represents nothing or "nada" as it is said in the story. The old man seems to have nothing. His wife is gone; his only solace is...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2015, 1:04 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The two waiters of Ernest Hemingway's "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" converse after the old man has been told by the younger waiter that he must go home. This younger waiter is eager to go home to...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2011, 7:54 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," there are existential overtones in the old man's search for the light and a clean café, the waiter's efforts to establish order by reciting the Lord's Prayer using...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2015, 9:33 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Here are some additional observations on setting and theme: Setting: The significance of the setting of Hemingway's story is certainly suggested in the fact that it is given the priority of being...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2014, 1:53 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Ernest Hemingway always writes with a simple and almost journalistic style. In "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," he is perhaps even more minimalistic than ever. Your question refers to vocabulary, so...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2013, 9:47 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In basic terms, a nihilist is someone who believes in nothing, a person for whom life has no worth or value. Such a tragic attitude is often adopted by people who've been dealt a bad hand in life...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2021, 8:06 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Dialogue predominates the story in Hemingway's "A Clean Well-Lighted Place." The dialogue is almost exclusively between the two waiters--the waiter with a wife who is in a hurry and the old...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2011, 2:26 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In his short story "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," Ernest Hemingway employs the literary tools of symbols to convey man's attempt to generate a sense of structure and meaning in order to fill the...

Latest answer posted November 17, 2015, 7:31 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

In "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," light symbolizes a safe refuge from the chaos of the world. In this story, an old deaf man sits in the shadows in a café. The shadows represent his feelings of...

Latest answer posted September 29, 2021, 5:55 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

The younger waiter is fairly straightforward in his implied expressions of what the café represents for him. He has a wife, he has confidence, and he has a livelihood. The café both is and...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2012, 9:48 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

Let's approach the answer in two parts--the reader-response component and the story itself. The essence of the reader-response is the individual reader's response to a text. That is, every reader...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2012, 6:28 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Showing 1-50 of 108