Break, Break, Break Questions and Answers

Break, Break, Break

The central idea of the poem concerns the dehumanizing power of uncontrollable grief. The speaker stands before the violent waves, enjoining them to continue crashing hard against the rocks. He may...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2019, 9:43 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

A "critical appreciation," or critical analysis, consists of a discussion of themes, thesis, structure, literary devices including elements, which are common to all specimens of the literary type,...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2010, 9:25 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In “Break, Break, Break,” Tennyson contrasts the power of nature with the relative weakness of a man struck down by grief. It is generally thought that the speaker of the poem is Tennyson himself,...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2020, 10:56 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

The sea is a useful symbol in the poem because it can be used to contrast the awesome power of nature with the speaker's emotional weakness and vulnerability. The thoughts that rise within him are...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2019, 9:50 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Literally, when the speaker tells the sea to "Break, break, break / At the foot of thy crags," he is ordering the sea to go ahead and crash into the rocks at the base of the land, perhaps the land...

Latest answer posted January 1, 2018, 7:32 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Tennyson's speaker repeats the word "break" three times in two different stanzas of the poem. Repetition is used for emphasis, and Tennyson is trying to emphasize the relentless way waves...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2019, 4:10 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Tennyson's poem, "Break, Break, Break," is an elegiac poem with a mournful, longing tone. The speaker mourns and longs for "the touch of a vanish'd hand" and for "the sound of a voice that is...

Latest answer posted September 14, 2019, 8:06 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Tennyson's "Break, Break, Break" is a brief poem which juxtaposes the speaker's lament for "the touch of a vanish'd hand" with the everyday activities of others in society who simply continue with...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2018, 8:51 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

The sea is not directly referenced in the third stanza. There are two ways to look at the other images in this stanza. The "stately ships" suggests ships that they are majestic, moving slowly, and...

Latest answer posted June 7, 2015, 10:28 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

If we assume the speaker and the poet to be one and the same, then we can infer that the poet feels grief-stricken and hopeless. The recurring image throughout the poem, described by the speaker,...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2019, 11:20 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Yes I think the title "Break, Break, Break" is appropriate. The poem opens with an image of waves breaking on the shore. The shore is cold and gray, and the poet struggles with how to express the...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2018, 2:48 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In this poem, written in the 1835, Tennyson expresses his inability to articulate grief for his close friend, Arthur Henry Hallam, who had died just two years before. In the poem, the speaker...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2019, 2:49 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

It is generally believed that “Break, Break, Break” was inspired by the untimely death of Tennyson's close friend, Arthur Henry Hallam. This would account for the overwhelming sense of grief that...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2020, 11:01 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

At the beginning and end of the poem "Break, Break, Break," the speaker implicitly compares himself to the sea. In the first stanza, for example, the speaker describes in the first two lines the...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2019, 9:46 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

"Break, Break, Break" is one of the poems that Alfred, Lord Tennyson wrote after the death of his close friend Arthur Henry Hallam. In it, Tennyson expresses the grief that he feels at the loss of...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2019, 2:02 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem "Break, Break, Break," the speaker laments that he cannot cry out the thoughts inside of him as he addresses the sea in apostrophe. Ironically, though, his poem...

Latest answer posted January 1, 2018, 10:17 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In the famous poem "Break, Break, Break" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, the poet observes waves breaking upon a stony shore while he contemplates the loss of a loved one. The poet is expressing his...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2019, 2:37 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

The repetition of the word "break" suggests that the waves keep breaking, over and over again. It suggests that things change and time moves on ceaselessly: regardless of human actions. The waves...

Latest answer posted June 7, 2015, 9:45 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

"Break, Break, Break" is not a free verse poem. Free verse is characterized by a lack of meter, rhyme, or rhythm; it can be composed of single lines, verses, or a block of text, but it is not...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2013, 8:10 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In the poem "Break, Break, Break" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, the poet is at the edge of the sea watching the waves break on the shore. He longs to be able to express the emotions he feels. Around...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2021, 3:56 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Tennyson's speaker expresses his grief over the death of an unnamed friend in the poem "Break, Break, Break." A tone of loss and alienation from life's joys permeates these verses. The speaker...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2021, 12:53 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In the third stanza of "Break, Break, Break," the speaker wishes that he could touch the hand and hear the voice of a friend who has died. The poem is an expression of grief, and most critics feel...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2021, 3:03 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In "Break, Break, Break," the speaker's grief at the loss of a close friend is generally thought to reflect Tennyson's own grief at the loss of Arthur Henry Hallam, his closest friend who died...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2021, 10:12 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In poetry, there is usually one controlling metaphor and a tension that is set up between two ideas. Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem, "Break, break, break," sets up such a tension between the...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2010, 1:17 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Here is the poem: Break, Break, Break Break, break, break,On thy cold gray stones, O Sea!And I would that my tongue could utterThe thoughts that arise in me.O well for the fisherman's boy,That he...

Latest answer posted February 25, 2010, 10:18 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

"Break, Break, Break" has lines with varying numbers of syllables. The metrical feet also vary. For instance, the first line has only three stressed (long) syllables and this is called a molossus....

Latest answer posted March 20, 2013, 9:58 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

The speaker is addressing the sea. He does this through the use of a figure of speech called an apostrophe (not be confused with the punctuation mark of the same name). This involves an address,...

Latest answer posted November 17, 2019, 7:55 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

This poem by the "great rhythmic teacher and prophet...of a Spiritual Universe" is melancholic as were his early poems. Also, it calls to mind the reflection of Ralph Waldo Emerson that "Nature...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2011, 2:35 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In the poem "Break, Break, Break" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, the speaker contemplates waves breaking upon the seashore, the children of fishermen playing together, a young sailor singing in his...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2019, 5:29 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Short Answer to the four questions: Nature is depicted as the objective world The lyrical ego is the internal world of emotions The relationship between nature and the lyrical ego is this: Nature...

Latest answer posted June 7, 2015, 11:03 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Tennyson lost his best friend (and the fiance of his sister) when Arthur Henry Hallam died. In this poem, the narrator grieves the loss of a best friend. He speaks of how nature does not stop and...

Latest answer posted January 21, 2009, 2:31 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

This is a poem about grief. The speaker stands near the sea and hears (and possibly feels through the spray, though this is not stated) the crash of the waves on the shore. He wishes, that like the...

Latest answer posted January 14, 2021, 12:01 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In his poem "Break, Break, Break," the speaker looks out over the sea and listens as it crashes against the rocks. He wishes that he could give voice to the thoughts that fill him. In the poem's...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2021, 7:50 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In “Break, Break, Break,” Tennyson depicts the sea as being in constant motion, breaking against the shore. He also tells us about the sea’s surroundings, the “cold gray stones” and the crags....

Latest answer posted January 15, 2022, 4:18 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Trimeter means a poetic line with three metrical feet. These feet do not have to be iambic; they can be trochaic, anapestic, or dactylic, or other variations. Tennyson here, in “Break, Break,...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2013, 8:47 pm (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Rhythmically, an anapest is a foot which consists of two short, unstressed syllables followed by a final stressed syllable. A good way of remembering this is to say the word "anapest" out loud, as...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2013, 10:19 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

The atmosphere of the poem "Break, Break, Break" is informed by the speaker's tone, which is sometimes impassioned and desperate and sometimes melancholic. The melancholy is created in part by the...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2021, 8:47 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

The image of the breaking waves in Tennyson's poem "Break, Break, Break" conveys a sense of the pitiless march of time. The waves break on "cold gray stones," and the repetition of the word...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2021, 2:50 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

It is generally accepted among scholars and literary critics that “Break, Break, Break” is a meditation on Tennyson's feelings concerning his late lamented friend Arthur Henry Hallam. It's no...

Latest answer posted February 25, 2021, 11:15 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

As is frequently the case in his work, Tennyson gives us the sense of an irresistible power in nature in the opening of this famous poem. If the first stanza is looked at in isolation, the meaning...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2021, 5:41 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Alfred, Lord Tennyson does not mention the grave specifically in his poem "Break, Break, Break," but certainly he is preoccupied in it with death and the unpleasantness of it. Specifically, the...

Latest answer posted September 12, 2019, 7:42 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

In the fourth stanza of "Break, Break, Break," the speaker says that "the tender grace of a day that is dead" will never come back to him, implying a wish to return to the past, along with the...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2021, 3:23 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

The breaking of the waves on the shore, and in particular, the use of the word break, relates to the sense of the brokenness the speaker feels at the death of his friend, usually assumed to be...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2021, 6:04 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

Tennyson uses external circumstance, and particularly portraits of nature, to create mood in his poetry. He is especially effective at invoking melancholy in his work through a vision of decay in...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2011, 3:19 am (UTC)

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Break, Break, Break

The images of the sea in stanza 1 and stanza 4 are quite similar. In the first stanza, the "break" is repeated; as it is in stanza 4. This stresses the ongoing breaking, that the sea is...

Latest answer posted June 7, 2015, 10:01 pm (UTC)

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