The Botany of Desire Questions and Answers

The Botany of Desire

The overall argument in The Botany of Desire is that plants control us just as much as we control them. That is, they access our desires—for sweetness and beauty and pleasure—in order to ensure...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2013, 10:15 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Botany of Desire

Chapter 2 of The Botany of Desire showcases the tulip and explains its place in Western history and economics. Michael Pollan begins chapter 2 of this book by explaining his own personal connection...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2019, 6:09 pm (UTC)

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The Botany of Desire

Michael Pollan's Botany of Desire proposes an intriguing idea that plants use us more than we use them. They appeal to the human desire for beauty, sweetness, intoxication, and control to ensure...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2018, 10:59 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Botany of Desire

In Chapter Four of this fascinating book that explores the interaction of plants with humans, and how plants use human desires for their own benefit, Pollan turns his attention to the humble...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2013, 5:47 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Botany of Desire

In this book, Pollan explores the ways that plants develop certain characteristics to help prolong their lives or protect them from predators. In the case of the apple, the normally-bitter fruit...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2016, 9:43 pm (UTC)

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The Botany of Desire

The last section of this great work of non-fiction acts as a summary and a reinforcement of Pollan's main argument. As he visits his garden which he has ignored for the last couple of weeks, he is...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2013, 7:28 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Botany of Desire

What is so interesting about this text is the way that Pollan looks at botany from a completely different and unique viewpoint, arguing that plants actually have been using humans and our desire...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2013, 7:15 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Botany of Desire

Natural selection is the process of an organism adapting to its environment through characteristics that help it thrive. For example, an insect species might develop characteristics that make it...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2020, 10:02 pm (UTC)

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The Botany of Desire

Chapter 3, entitled "Intoxication," takes as its focus the plant of marijuana, and in particular, the way that this has become such an important plant to humans over time. What is interesting about...

Latest answer posted October 11, 2013, 6:09 am (UTC)

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The Botany of Desire

One way that Pollan makes the writing interesting is by sharing examples from pop culture and common knowledge. Pollan makes the secret life of plants and our interaction with them interesting....

Latest answer posted October 15, 2013, 9:37 pm (UTC)

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The Botany of Desire

You must be taking about Chapter Four: the Potato! The subtitle of this chapter, "Control," addresses the attempts by humans to utilize the potential of potatoes as a food crop by modifying them...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2016, 12:12 am (UTC)

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The Botany of Desire

Michael Pollan's introduction to this fascinating book describes the moment when he had the idea and insight for what the book would explore. He was planting fingerling potatoes, thinking of how...

Latest answer posted July 4, 2016, 10:39 pm (UTC)

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The Botany of Desire

Pollan in his book, as the title suggests, set out to write not just about the history of various plants and flowers, but also the relationship that these plants and flowers have had with humans...

Latest answer posted October 3, 2013, 5:52 am (UTC)

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The Botany of Desire

Tulipomania, or the obsession with tulips, is something that demonstrates the desire for beauty within humans through the constant search and quest of humans to breed and create other types of...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2013, 5:38 am (UTC)

1 educator answer