The Book of the Courtier Questions and Answers

The Book of the Courtier

On one hand, Castiglione has a fairly conventional view of women. They must by all means retain their femininity; they must be pleasing to the (male) eye, agreeable, and charming in conversation....

Latest answer posted February 14, 2018, 3:46 pm (UTC)

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The Book of the Courtier

Count Baldassare Castiglione's The Book of the Courtier (1528), as your question suggests, is a detailed discussion among a group of Italian aristocrats, ladies and gentlemen, about the physical...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2019, 1:39 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Book of the Courtier

Other answers here offer excellent ideas regarding the specific qualities a courtier ought to possess. A central concept of the Renaissance courtier is sprezzatura: an Italian word roughly meaning...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2018, 2:07 am (UTC)

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The Book of the Courtier

They say that you can tell a lot about someone from the company they keep. And that certainly seems to be the overriding message of The Book of the Courtier when it comes to the question of...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2020, 1:15 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Book of the Courtier

Most people have probably never heard of Baldassare Castiglione, let alone know of his text The Book of the Courtier. Unless studying the courts of the Renaissance period, his texts are mostly...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2012, 8:25 am (UTC)

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The Book of the Courtier

In The Book of the Courtier Castiglione regularly inveighs against fortune and its power to do us so much irreparable harm. In one particularly bitter passage he laments how fortune uplifts to the...

Latest answer posted March 8, 2019, 7:20 am (UTC)

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The Book of the Courtier

The way Baldassare Castiglione wrote The Book of the Courtier is important and ultimately shows his stance on the "Questione della Lingua" because he wrote his book in the vernacular. Like Dante...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2020, 3:47 pm (UTC)

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The Book of the Courtier

Gaspar, in The Book of the Courtiers, is one of the courtiers under the Duke of Urbino (who serves with Castiglione). This specific courtier was well spoken in the art of women and love. One...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2012, 10:05 am (UTC)

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The Book of the Courtier

The courtiers of the Renaissance period were expected to possess very specific characteristics. These characteristics were true to the ones exemplified by those who were chivalrous and courtly in...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2012, 2:54 am (UTC)

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The Book of the Courtier

Although Castiglione shared the classicist ideals of fellow Renaissance writers such as Bembo, he conceived literary form in a much more open way and believed there could be a profitable exchange...

Latest answer posted December 25, 2011, 5:51 pm (UTC)

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The Book of the Courtier

In The Book of the Courtier, the perfect courtier himself is an elusive ideal. Perfection, naturally, should be hard to attain. However, Castiglione certainly makes it more than challenging for...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2020, 10:54 pm (UTC)

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The Book of the Courtier

I believe you're referring to Pietro Monte, a famous master of arms who's referenced by Castiglione in The Book of the Courtier. Monte was very much the typical Renaissance man—a soldier, a...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2018, 6:17 am (UTC)

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