Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth Questions and Answers

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Richard’s mother teaches him through experience how to stand up for himself. She sends him out to buy groceries, but he is accosted by a gang of boys who beat him and steal his money. Upon...

Latest answer posted September 12, 2019, 8:59 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

The main idea of the book is the way racism degrades one's life by forcing one into a role rather than allowing them to express their individuality. In a system pervaded by racism, Wright is not a...

Latest answer posted February 3, 2019, 12:38 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

In a nutshell, the novel's theme is the individual's struggle to survive in an atmosphere of prejudice and intolerance, and to understand the forces that create the environment in which he lives....

Latest answer posted June 4, 2008, 2:09 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

When the father leaves in "The Right To the Streets of Memphis," his departure results in great suffering for his family. First, the children have to endure persistent hunger. The narrator tells us...

Latest answer posted June 4, 2018, 9:41 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

In Chapter 1 of Richard Wright's autobiographical novel, he narrates of his experiences as a boy, Hunger stole upon me so slowly that at first I was not aware of what hunger really meant....The...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2012, 8:57 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

"The Kitten" is actually an episode from Richard Wright's childhood. In his book, he gives an account of what happened when he and his brother discovered a stray kitten wandering near their...

Latest answer posted July 20, 2018, 6:43 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Resentful of being ignored by his mother who tends his ailing grandmother, four-year-old Richard becomes curious about the fire that burns to warm the room. He takes some straws from the broom and...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012, 12:04 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

In his autobiographical novel, Black Boy Richard Wright makes splendid use of the abused male prototype. As the subject of his own work and narrator, Wright employs many options as he becomes both...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2010, 2:17 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Richard's mom is a complicated and polarizing figure. On one hand, she is the center of Richard's life—the one constant in a world that he finds increasingly confusing and hostile. On the other...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2017, 12:39 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Richard and his brother helped a little kitten that they found in their backyard and this made their father angry. The kitten was making too much noise, and their father told Richard to, “Kill that...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2008, 12:01 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

After Richard reads an editorial in a newspaper that attacks Henry Louis Mencken, he is curious to learn why the paper would attack a white man. He asks a co-worker, an Irish Catholic named Falk...

Latest answer posted September 29, 2010, 11:00 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Men can starve from lack of self-realization as much as they can from lack of bread. —Richard Wright Black Boy is author Richard Wright's 1945 autobiographical account of his childhood and early...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2020, 4:33 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

At the railroad station, while waiting for the train that would take him to Arkansas, Richard notices for the first time that "there (are) two lines of people at the ticket window, a 'white'...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2008, 2:30 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Richard Wright did not so much change the title of his autobiography and sociological examination of race in America from American Hunger to Black Boy as he simply divided his literary work into...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2015, 3:08 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

In Richard Wright's autobiography, Black Boy, Richard tells of his attempts to earn enough money so that he can escape the impoverished life he lives. In all of the jobs that Richard has, he...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2009, 2:06 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Richard quit selling the newspapers when he became aware that the particular paper he was selling was preaching Ku Klux Klan doctrines. Richard had no idea what was in the papers he was selling....

Latest answer posted August 21, 2009, 7:12 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Brother Mance is an insurance salesman who makes his living selling policies to poor, illiterate families working on plantations. Brother Mance is himself illiterate, which probably explains why he...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2019, 6:42 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

On his first day of school, young Richard attaches himself to a group of older boys on the playground and follows them about, "listening to their talk, asking countless questions". He...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2008, 2:39 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

In Chapter 9 of Black Boy, after Richard Wright has been fired from a being a delivery boy for not laughing and talking as the other blacks do, driven off, he writes, "because of my attitude, my...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2010, 10:50 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

The hunger felt by Richard is both literal and metaphorical. Taken literally the hunger felt by Richard signifies his family's poverty and deprived social condition. While staying with Granny in...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2010, 2:56 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

The posthumously published "American Hunger" has now been added to Black Boy which ended in 1925. This motif of hunger is what ties the two parts of Wright's novel together; hunger is both literal...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2009, 11:27 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

After having lived in decrepit shacks, Granny's home in Jackson, Mississippi, is "an enchanting place to explore." It is large, two stories, and has seven rooms. In the long, narrow hallways,...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2009, 1:10 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

"Black Boy" is divided into two parts: "Southern Night," which explores Wright's formative years growing up in the Jim Crow South and "The Horror and the Glory" which documents Wright's political...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2019, 12:58 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Hunger is personified in Wright's autobiography. Personification is when an inanimate object takes on human characteristics. At nightRichard sayshunger "stoleupon me" and "I began to...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2007, 10:33 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

The author's main point in Black Boy is the redemptive power of art. For example, when a schoolteacher is boarding with Richard's family and reads him Bluebeard (a novel), Richard's world is...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2017, 1:30 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Hunger plagues Richard incessantly in chapter 5. The reason Richard is always hungry is because he lives with his grandmother, who is a strict Seventh-Day Adventist. Many people who profess the...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2018, 8:55 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Black Boy is Richard Wright's memoir and narrates his experience of growing up poor and black in the American South. Wright's father left when he was young, requiring his mother to struggle to...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2016, 12:51 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

There is only one narrative point-of-view in Black Boy by Richard Wright; the novel is written from a first-person perspective from the point-of-view of the author and narrator, Richard Wright. One...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2019, 6:03 pm (UTC)

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Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Wright depicts how black people, particularly black men, learn to debase themselves in order to survive. For example, the elevator operator, Shorty, is willing to play to racist stereotypes about...

Latest answer posted November 9, 2018, 1:32 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

You'll find a fairly long list of questions for your consideration about this book in the Topics for Further Study section of the enotes study guide:http://www.enotes.com/black-boy-wright/7367 In...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2007, 12:57 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

After having lived an impoverished life, physically, socially, and psychologically, in his fifteenth year, Richard becomes profoundly aware of the limitations of any opportunity to improve his...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2015, 9:38 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Richard starts to play with fire because he is frustrated and bored. As he is a very young child at this stage, he is not fully aware of the possible dangers of his actions. Richard is four years...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2008, 7:17 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

This passage comes at the end of Chapter 8 of Black Boy, a chapter in which Richard has striven to find his own voice and express an individualism. But, as he says, he becomes ...aware of the...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2013, 4:54 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Richard Wright's childhood experiences propelled him to escape the South, question religion, and become a writer. As a child, Wright felt alienated from his family, and confused by the larger...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2015, 7:19 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

The opening and ending scenes of the autobiography Black Boy (American Hunger) show Richard's independent personality and his rejection of every type of authority. In the opening scene, it is the...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2010, 8:25 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

In the beginning of Black Boy, Richard is four-years-old. He and his family live in Mississippi with his grandmother. While playing he accidentally sets the curtins on fire. He tries to put the...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2008, 3:13 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Because Richard refuses to adapt to his deprived social surroundings and constantly seeks opportunities to improve himself. He is an individualist and a materialist who refuses his family's bigotry...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2010, 1:00 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

An autobiographical novel, Black Boy is Richard Wright's record of how literacy enables him to emerge from his poor background. With its subtitle of American Hunger, And, in his account of his...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2011, 2:31 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

This excerpt from Richard Wright's Black Boy clearly shows a mother who wants her son to be successful in life, thinks he has talent--but clearly sees writing as something less than a worthy...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2010, 10:27 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

1. the kitten In the autobiographical Black Boy by Richard Wright, as a boy Richard is rather defiant and he also acts on his own without considering the consequences. He unwisely kills an innocent...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2015, 8:44 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

These parenthetical interjections are a modernist technique that interrupt the linear narrative. In other words, the modernist story does not go straight from point A to point B. You are right,...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2009, 11:46 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

These excerpts from Black Boy have a literal meaning, which is that Richard Wright's mother works as a cook for white people. While visiting with her at work, Wright, as a five-year-old boy, is...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2019, 1:34 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

In part 1 of this sad account of a man's "indoctrination" on how a black man is supposed to live under Jim Crow laws, Richard is, indeed, between a rock and a hard place. Morrie is adamant that...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2015, 4:34 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

In chapter nine of Black Boy by Richard Wright, we learn that young Richard (the autobiographical protagonist of the story) is desperate for another job and takes the first one he can find. Richard...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2014, 2:21 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

The meager income Richard earned was quickly eaten away by "the endless expenses at home". Living with his grandmother and his invalid mother in Jackson, Mississippi, Richard's existence is a...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2009, 3:46 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

In the narration of his life, Black Boy, Richard Wright never learns how to be "black" as the Jim Crow South and even the Communist Party wish him to be. Stymied in the expression of his soul and...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2010, 3:18 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

In his early years, Richard is quite naive and does not understand race relations in society. He attempts to understand by asking questions which fall on deaf ears. No one can really explain to him...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2019, 8:08 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Griggs is telling Richard what many black mentors told the young people around them at this place and time--you can only get ahead as a black man if you defer to the white men around them. Tragic...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2011, 6:50 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

This book, along with others (Invisible Man by Ellison among them) attempts to walk readers through life in the shoes of a black man/person. The prejudice is apparent, and anyone who reads...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2007, 8:40 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth

Richard Wright's formal education was brief and inconsistent. His parents were poor sharecroppers in the rural south. There was little money or time for school. When he was 6, his father abandoned...

Latest answer posted August 19, 2008, 3:52 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

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