A Bird came down the Walk— Questions and Answers

A Bird came down the Walk—

In "A Bird came down the Walk—" Dickinson uses a number of literary devices. She uses personification, for example, when she gives the bird some human characteristics. Notice in the first stanza...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2017 8:08 am UTC

2 educator answers

A Bird came down the Walk—

This phrase occurs in the poem "A bird came down the walk--" by Emily Dickinson. The phrase is part of a metaphor: "he unrolled his feathers / And rowed him softer home— / Than Oars divide the...

Latest answer posted May 8, 2016 3:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

This poem is a beautiful example of Dickinson's style, which often employs radically unique syntax and diction to craft images of astounding poetic quality. Unfortunately, because they are so...

Latest answer posted August 9, 2016 5:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

To understand the last stanza of Dickinson's poem, you really need to read the last two stanzas together and understand the structure of the poem as a whole. The first three stanzas describe the...

Latest answer posted April 1, 2012 9:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

One can almost picture the poet, Emily Dickinson, sitting outside somewhere in a beautiful field as she wrote this poem about a bird. It describes one of those beautiful moments in nature that are...

Latest answer posted September 9, 2018 4:08 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Bird came down the Walk—

"A Bird Came Down a Walk" by Emily Dickinson reveals both the danger and beauty of the outer, natural world and the inner, self-conscious world of both the bird and the speaker. In most poetry,...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2010 8:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

In this poem, Emily Dickinson describes the actions and antics of a little bird she observes coming down the walk. In the first two stanzas of the poem, the speaker's tone is curious and even...

Latest answer posted January 1, 2021 6:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

In this particular phrase from “A Bird came down the Walk—” the speaker wants to emphasize certain features of the bird that she's describing. She's already told us about his “rapid eyes” that look...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2021 11:23 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

Emily Dickinson's poem focuses on how humans frequently want to ascribe human motivation to animal behavior while downplaying the animal's instinctive understanding of its surroundings. In doing...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2016 2:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

The bird that has alighted on this plot of land is hopping about, feeding on worms and lapping up dew from the grass. However, as all animals are, it is constantly on watch. When the bird takes a...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2019 8:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

"A Bird came down the Walk" by the poet Emily Dickinson is a five-stanza poem concerning her perceptions upon seeing this winged creature go about its daily activities. It is her observation of...

Latest answer posted May 13, 2013 6:19 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Bird came down the Walk—

The poem "A Bird came down the Walk" by Emily Dickinson describes a chance outdoor encounter the poet has with a bird. At first, the bird does not notice the poet, and so it continues to perform as...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2019 1:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

The relevant part of the poem in answering this question comes in the penultimate stanza. The speaker cautiously offers the little bird a crumb to eat; but instead of gratefully accepting this...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2019 5:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

It's only the second and fourth lines that rhyme: A Bird came down the Walk—He did not know I saw—He bit an Angleworm in halvesAnd ate the fellow, raw, "Saw" at the end of the second line rhymes...

Latest answer posted May 9, 2016 1:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

As with most poetry, answers will vary based on personal interpretation. That being said, the speaker is displaying an awe for nature here, and I think “reverent” is a word that succinctly sums up...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2018 1:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

The setting of this poem is outdoors, in a place with a sidewalk, a wall, and grass, along with a worm and a beetle, so it might be a park or someone's yard. It's probably early in the day, because...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2016 9:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

Generally speaking, it is good advice to assume that the speaker of the poem is not the author. When we assume that the speaker, even when unnamed, is the poet him- or herself, we can often miss...

Latest answer posted June 24, 2018 12:44 am UTC

2 educator answers

A Bird came down the Walk—

Emily Dickinson's "A Bird Came Down the Walk" conveys the danger and the freedom a bird feels in the wild. While the bird is clearly anxious throughout the poem, its sudden flight shows the reader...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2011 7:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

It's hard to say what the climax of Emily Dickinson's "A Bird came down the Walk" is; indeed, it's difficult to say if there even is a climax in the poem, as the piece (like all of Dickinson's...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2016 1:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

Emily Dickinson calls the grass convenient because it is right there by the Bird, covered with dew when the Bird needs a drink. On a deeper thematic level, the convenience of the grass is part of...

Latest answer posted September 12, 2019 2:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

Poetry has lyrical origins, as people in ancient times tried to preserve and pass down their culture and history. As such, poetry is imaginative and uses words (diction) and elements of poetry,...

Latest answer posted February 29, 2016 6:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

The little bird behaves in a completely natural manner when he's sure that no one's looking at him. He acts just like any normal bird would under the circumstances, biting a worm in half before...

Latest answer posted February 23, 2020 11:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

This is a matter of interpretation. We could offer different lines as candidates for the climax, or we could claim that there are multiple ones, or none. Personally, I'm not convinced that the poem...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2016 11:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

The flying aspect of the bird’s motion comes rather late in Emily Dickinson’s poem. For more than half of the poem, the bird does not fly. Instead, as the speaker observes, he does a number of...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2019 12:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

This quote does a good job of summarizing Emily Dickinson's poem "A Bird came down the Walk." Let's look at each of the four adjectives separately to see how they work in the poem. Abundance:...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2016 2:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

Emily Dickinson's charming poem "A Bird Came Down The Walk" is an account of just that—the poet watches the bird and its actions intently, with fascination and a congenial, humorous view. The bird...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2016 8:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

The bird in this poem does not ask anything either of the reader or of the speaker, who is watching him with interest. On the contrary, the bird "did not know" he was being watched as he came down...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2018 1:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

In Emily Dickinson's poem "A Bird came down the Walk—," the bird is searching for a morning meal. The bird is able to find a worm that he quickly snatches up and bites in half. Then, satisfied with...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2019 5:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

The speaker doesn't explicitly state why she offered food to the bird. Perhaps she took pity on him because all he'd had to eat up until then was a raw angleworm. Whatever her motives, in offering...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2019 7:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

Dickinson's prolific use of the dash always raises questions for the reader. What do we make of them? Aside from giving her poems a major mark of distinction, and aside from expressing sudden...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2016 9:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

There are a couple of spots where the speaker of "A Bird came down the Walk" voices conflicting, or ambivalent, feelings regarding nature, primarily seen through her focus of the bird noted in the...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2019 7:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

Are you asking each editor who reads this question to respond by telling you the type of question that he or she generally answers?

Latest answer posted April 26, 2010 9:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

The bird that the speaker is observing in this poem actually displays all of its bird-related instincts to the speaker, and she relates them over the course of his relatively short 5 stanza poem!...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2012 9:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

Thanks, everyone!

Latest answer posted December 11, 2009 1:04 pm UTC

6 educator answers

A Bird came down the Walk—

In her poem "A Bird came down the Walk—" Emily Dickinson employs a markedly contemplative tone. In the first stanza, Dickinson specifies that the speaker is a detached onlooker to the actions of...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2021 12:36 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Bird came down the Walk—

In the third stanza of the poem, the speaker says that the bird "glanced with rapid eyes, / That hurried all abroad." The implication here is that the bird was looking for predators that might have...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2021 4:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer