Ben Jonson Questions and Answers

Ben Jonson

This is a short poem, and it presents its message succinctly, in a way that is in keeping with that message itself. Jonson is cautioning the reader against the belief that "bulk" or longevity...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2018 9:27 am UTC

2 educator answers

Ben Jonson

Ben Jonson’s poem beginning “Come, my Celia, let us prove” is sometimes read as an appealing love lyric. In its original context, however – as part of Jonson’s play Volpone – it is clearly meant...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2011 1:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

The tone of a poem is the mood or emotion it conveys. The tone of "On My first Son," is one of deep and sincere grief for the loss of a beloved child, as the opening lines reveal: Farewell, thou...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2019 10:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

This song, so famous in English, is a classic and fascinating expression of love. Jonson's ideas are so sincere and unusual that they are memorable as well as beautiful. "Drink to me only with...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2010 2:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

Volpone uses physical disguises to turn the tables and trick those who would trick him. First, Volpone disguises himself as Scoto the Mountebank in order to see Celia, the beautiful wife of...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2018 4:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

By literary terms, I take you to mean what are commonly called literary devices, ways to enhance a piece of writing that go beyond bare-bones factual (literal) information. Literary devices make a...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2019 3:14 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Ben Jonson

Although your question seems like a legitimate inquiry, it's also possible that it is a trick question. Let me take each idea in turn, and then you can decide. First, let's take the question at...

Latest answer posted March 30, 2015 3:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

To start with, the definition of an allegory is that it is a type of writing that has a double meaning. On one level, it is a romance or adventure etc (e.g., Spenser's Faerie Queene) while on...

Latest answer posted January 14, 2010 12:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

The conclusion Jonson comes to in this poem is that although he has been buffeted terribly by the poor reaction to his most recent dramatic work, he is not a poor writer and must not allow himself...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2019 3:11 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Ben Jonson

The poem 'It is not growing like a tree' by Ben Jonson has a theme of estimating worth or value. At the beginning of the poem he is saying something akin to the old saying 'brain versus brawn'...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2009 3:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

I would say that the tone of this second stanza is one of disappointment and longing. In this stanza, the speaker has sent his love a wreath of flowers. He hopes that it will stay on her and...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2010 9:07 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

Ben Jonson’s poem “Epitaph on S. P., a Child of Queen Elizabeth’s Chapel” and Robert Herrick’s poem “Upon Prue, His Maid” are two works, by seventeenth-century writers, that commemorate the dead....

Latest answer posted September 22, 2011 2:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

Ben Jonson’s poem beginning “Come, my Celia, let us prove” originally appeared as a song in Jonson’s famous 1605 comedy titled Volpone. In the play, the lecherous Volpone uses the song to try to...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2011 3:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

I'm not quite sure. It's an odd mix of the absolutely colloquial and personal, and a slightly arch, grander style. The first four lines, addressing the son are particularly colloquial: Farewell,...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2009 3:23 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

English literary periods are named for monarchs, as with the Elizabethan period, or historical events, as with the Restoration period, or for great literary times or movements, as with the Middle...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2010 7:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

Three things are being undercut in this poem by Ben Jonson. The first is the lady's right to independent decision. The second is joined in the importance of a good name and the harm of rumor. The...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2010 9:11 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

The poem, the first in a genre of poems in praise of country houses, was written with two underlying agendas. The first was to compliment and flatter Jonson's patron, Robert Sidney, the earl of...

Latest answer posted June 1, 2019 11:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

I'm afraid this question is too big and too open-ended to really address in this format. Johnson was one of Shakespeare's contemporaries, and wrote a number of plays. He's best known for his...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2007 1:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

Assuming that the poem is meant to be broken up into two stanzas, the first being 10 and the second being 8, the rhyme scheme is as follows: stanza 1:abbbacccbb and stanza 2: abbaacca. There is no...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2010 4:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

To help you get started on this question, let's take a close look at each of these two poems. Ben Jonson's “To Penshurst” creates a sense of place through vivid details and intricate descriptions....

Latest answer posted May 28, 2021 2:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

Various elements of the structure of Ben Jonson's poem "On My First Son" help create sympathy both for the dead son and for the grieving father. Written to mourn and commemorate the death of young...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2011 8:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

The Masque of Blackness and its sequel, the Masque of Beauty, were intended to show off the beauty and accomplishments of the royal court, in a display of visual pageantry created by court...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2012 3:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

This play was written by Ben Jonson after being asked to write a play by Anne of Denmark, who was the queen consort of James I. She wanted a play to be written where the main characters would be...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2012 1:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ben Jonson

"Song: To Celia" is an extremely rhythmical love song. It has a very definite meter that alternates between iambic tetrameter and iambic trimeter. All lines of trimeter rhyme within each stanza...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2009 12:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer