The Bells Questions and Answers

The Bells

"The Bells" is a fascinating poem. If it is read aloud correctly, the listener can almost hear bells tolling in the bell tower. I think you've pretty much covered the poetic sound devices with the...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2011 6:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Bells

In certain stanzas, “The Bells” by Edgar Allan Poe is an example of a poem that relies heavily on the use of onomatopoeia to include words that sound like the actual sound that they describe. In...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2020 11:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Bells

The stanzas of Edgar Allan Poe's poem "The Bells" grow longer as the poem progresses. The first stanza is fourteen lines, the length, though not the meter, of a sonnet. The second stanza is twice...

Latest answer posted December 26, 2020 11:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Bells

The words tinkle and clanging are examples of onomatopoeia, meaning that the words "sound" like what they mean. In "The Bells," Edgar Alan Poe uses these and many other onomatopoeic words to...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2013 8:43 pm UTC

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The Bells

“The Bells,” a poem by Edgar Allen Poe, mentions four different kinds of bells. First the cheerful silver bells of a sledge. Then, joyful wedding bells. The third bells mentioned are alarm bells...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2019 3:23 am UTC

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The Bells

In "The Bells" by Edgar Allan Poe, we hear four types of bells ringing. In the first stanza, we hear silver sleigh bells jingling and tinkling in lightness and merriment. These bells are joyous and...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2019 1:27 am UTC

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The Bells

Broadly, the genre is poetry. Subcategorized, the genre is an "ode." An ode is something akin to a song; odes have a lyrical meter that can almost be sung. (Without too much effort,...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2008 9:43 am UTC

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The Bells

There are many aspects of Edgar Allan Poe's poem "The Bells" that lend themselves to interpretation. I will identify a few of them. You might focus on the symbolism of the different types of bells...

Latest answer posted August 11, 2013 11:11 pm UTC

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The Bells

In the first stanza, the bells are associated with silver and with emotions of merriment and pleasure. The tone is happy, and the bells jingle and tinkle. The scene is at night, perhaps describing...

Latest answer posted April 25, 2021 2:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Bells

The first five lines are: Hear the sledges with the bells - Silver bells! What a world of merriment their melody foretells! How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle, In the icy air of night! The words...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2007 7:58 am UTC

1 educator answer