Anthem for Doomed Youth Questions and Answers

Anthem for Doomed Youth

The irony in the poem is foreshadowed by the irony in this title. Owen writes a bitter poem about the fate of so many soldiers in World War I and deliberately uses the title to mock the...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2013 6:11 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

There are lots of figures of speech in the second stanza of "Anthem for Doomed Youth," most of which draw on a motif of light and darkness. For example, in the opening line, "What candles may be...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2019 11:58 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Wilfred Owen conveys his anti-war attitude through the central metaphor around which the poem is organized. The poem asks how the young soldiers who died on the battlefields are being memorialized....

Latest answer posted September 3, 2016 12:27 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

What passing-bells for these who die as cattle? The tone of the first stanza of Owen's "Anthem for Doomed Youth" is crystallized in the first line, above. Borrowing from Edmund Spenser's genius,...

Latest answer posted September 29, 2011 11:09 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

This simile suggests a lot about both the soldiers and the war that is leading them to be killed in such a spectacularly numerous way. The key to understanding any simile is thinking about the kind...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2012 5:51 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

In Wilfred Owens's "Anthem for Doomed Youth," the poet employs sound imagery in the first stanza and visual imagery in the second. With its indirect appeal to the senses of sight, sound, smell,...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2015 11:57 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Owen's aggressively anti-war poem uses the metaphor of a church service to frame the horrific scene of men dying, most likely in France, during World War I. Instead of the sound of church bells...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2011 5:47 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

The overarching theme or message from the poem is the futility of war. The language of the poem is one that helps to construct the grim landscape of death as an intrinsic part of war. Constructed...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2010 8:04 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

In Wilfred Owen's World War I poem "Anthem for Doomed Youth," the deceased soldiers do not receive prayers, bells, or songs from choirs. Instead, their deaths are marked only by the sounds of guns,...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2016 1:03 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

When people ask a rhetorical question, it is often because the question has an implied answer. When the speaker asks, "What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?" the implied answer is none....

Latest answer posted November 17, 2018 2:12 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

In "Anthem for Doomed Youth" Owen compares the trappings of a normal funeral, a dignified, ceremonial commemoration of death, with the horrific reality of violent death on the battlefield. Out...

Latest answer posted December 10, 2019 6:54 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Let us remember that a metaphor is a form of figurative language in which one object is normally compared to another directly, without the use of the words "like" or "as," as in a simile. Normally...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2011 7:09 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

The youth in this poem are doomed because they have been called to a war—World War I—which will steal their childhood and innocence. In addition, these young boys are doomed to never truly grow...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2019 8:54 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Alliteration is an example of a literary device where, in a series of words that may or may not be next to each other, the initial consonant sound is repeated to create a special sound effect. If...

Latest answer posted March 30, 2011 7:14 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

In the poem "Anthem for Doomed Youth" by Wilfred Owen, the poet asks "what passing bells for these that die as cattle" will ring, but more particularly, will ring in churches. All the way through...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2010 6:57 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

As with any of these kind of questions, it is very important to read the word or phrase you are trying to define in the context of the poem as a whole and especially the sentence in which it...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2011 7:04 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Owen saw the horror of World War I up close, fighting in it and losing his life in battle a week before the armistice. This poem is part of a series of anti-war poems he wrote near the end of his...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2020 9:51 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

The theme of Owen's sonnet presents the bitter irony of the terrible costs and brutal realities of warfare in contrast to the incapability of England's rituals to honor the fallen soldiers and...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2016 8:23 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

In "Anthem for Doomed Youth," Owen presents war as horrifying because it is dehumanizing and because it is a tragic waste of young life. In the opening line, the speaker asks, "What passing-bells...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2019 11:01 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Wilfred Owen uses the Italian sonnet form to reflect the losses of World War I by employing the first eight lines (or octave) to address the terrible cost of the loss of young men's lives in war...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2016 3:28 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Consonance has several definitions, and it can be used synonymously with alliteration to describe the repetition of initial consonant sounds in words which are near one another in a text. The...

Latest answer posted March 18, 2021 1:33 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

In Wilfred Owen's World War I poem, "Anthem for Doomed Youth," all of the elements of a funeral are represented by the trappings of war. The guns act like the tolling of bells for the dead; the...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2011 3:27 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

The life of the poet Wilfred Owen is as heart breaking as the war poetry he wrote. After suffering from shell shock in World War I, Owen stayed in a hospital where he wrote many of his poems....

Latest answer posted January 1, 2013 3:12 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Though Wilfred Owen was a participant in the First World War, he was never under any illusions about the true nature of armed conflict. Not for him was the romanticized portrait of war presented by...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2020 10:50 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Wildred Owen's "Anthem for Doomed Youth" describes the juxtaposition of what youth is meant to be and what young soldiers get instead. Owen begins his poem by posing the question, "What...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2019 11:43 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Wilfred Owen constructed this poem in iambic pentameter. This means most of the lines are broken up into five feet (this is the penta- part), and each foot consists of one unstressed syllable...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2016 5:33 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

I believe that you are asking about Owen's use of striking imagery in his powerful, evocative descriptions of the horrors of World War I in "Anthem for Doomed Youth." "Anthem for Doomed Youth" is...

Latest answer posted January 27, 2016 5:10 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

"Anthem for Doomed Youth" is about the devastation of World War I. The poem is very much focused on the violence and extreme loss of life due to industrial warfare, with reference to shellings and...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2019 3:57 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

In 'Anthem for Doomed Youth' by English world war one poet Wilfred Owen, a mournful tone is set for the 'religious ceremony' so we presume it is a funeral. The words 'each dusk a drawing down of...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2009 12:47 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Wilfred Owen's “Anthem for Doomed Youth” presents a poignant portrait of dying soldiers. These young men, he says, “die as cattle.” They are guided in their passage from life to death not by the...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2021 6:58 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Anthem for Doomed Youth What passing-bells for these who die as cattle? a-- Only the monstrous anger of the guns. bOnly the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle aCan patter out their hasty orisons. bNo...

Latest answer posted November 26, 2011 4:41 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Most critics view Owens' poem "Anthem for Doomed Youth" as a mixture of the English and Italian sonnet forms-a hybrid. The poem, as you correctly noted, begins as an English sonnet with an ABAB...

Latest answer posted September 29, 2011 8:29 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

In the opening stanza of the poem, the speaker reflects on the deaths of those soldiers who have died during war. He says that these soldiers have died "as cattle," suggesting that they have not...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2021 10:41 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

I am not sure what you mean by “fog of war” because this phrase does not appear in this poem by Wilfred Owen, but it certainly is a phrase that has been applied to war and may be evident in the...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2010 10:21 pm UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

In Wilfred Owen's "Anthem for Doomed Youth," the author refers to the tolling of bells. It has been a common practice in England for hundreds of years to toll church bells at someone's passing. It...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2011 2:47 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Yes... I mean it doesn't come out and say "war is bad" but here are the relevant lines. Seems to me to be sort of saying that it's dumb to go off to war and all you get is dead young men. Where...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2009 12:19 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

In Wilfred Owen's poem, "Anthem for Doomed Youth," the antecedent for "these" does refer to the dying soldiers. However, it seems that the poem's title provides us with the best answer based on the...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2011 2:08 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

The poems 'Demeter' by Carol Ann Duffy and 'Anthem for Doomed Youth' by Wilfred Owen both deal with the theme of mourning. In that much there are similarities. Duffy's poem reminds us of a story...

Latest answer posted January 9, 2010 6:48 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

The bugles in Wilfred Owen's "Anthem for Doomed Youth" come "from sad shires." Shire is the British equivalent of county. They are unlikely, then, to be playing anything directly related to...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2011 10:10 am UTC

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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Strictly, an antecedent is defined as the word, phrase, or clause that determines what a pronoun refers to. Applying this definition to your question, it is clear that "these," and other words that...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2011 7:18 pm UTC

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