African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

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African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

There were several methods used by the southern states to keep African Americans from voting. One method that was used was the poll tax. The poll tax required a person to pay a fee in order to...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2017 1:08 am UTC

2 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The Southern economy was overwhelmingly agrarian and so land-ownership was the main source of wealth in that part of the world. Therefore, if the freed slaves were ever going to take their rightful...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2019 8:39 am UTC

2 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The American nation did not make provision to integrate the freed blacks into society. They were treated in the north and west, and by the nonslaveholders of the South, as a pariah. Many or most...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2010 11:19 am UTC

2 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

In some ways, African American lives changed after 1865. Slavery was officially outlawed, and during the Reconstruction period (1865-1876), there was some attempt not only to provide African...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2018 10:56 pm UTC

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African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The Civil War and Reconstruction had long-lasting effects. It took awhile to sort everything out. There was also a burgeoning civil rights movement, and the KKK was attempting to stifle any...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2011 12:29 pm UTC

4 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

When the Ku Klux Klan first formed in the South, its purpose was to reverse the improvements African-Americans received as a result of Reconstruction. White southerners weren’t happy that...

Latest answer posted December 27, 2015 11:26 pm UTC

3 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

First of all, we must recognize that not all of the African Americans who had been slaves reacted in the same way after the Civil War made them free. Different individuals reacted in different...

Latest answer posted October 30, 2014 2:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The gains for African-Americans in the Reconstruction Era were huge. The obvious one is that slavery was ended, and millions of African-Americans who had been enslaved were freed. Much of the...

Latest answer posted January 21, 2016 7:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The Freedmen's Bureau, technically known as the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, was established in the final days of the Civil War. Its purpose was to provide relief and economic...

Latest answer posted December 2, 2019 9:10 pm UTC

4 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The Freedmen's Bureau was established during the Civil War by the United States government to deal with the challenges faced by the hundreds of thousands of former slaves in the South. It was...

Latest answer posted November 26, 2015 5:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

After the Civil War, many former slaves searched for missing family members who were either sold or displaced by the war. Many former slaves took advantage of their new freedom of movement and...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2018 7:26 pm UTC

2 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

As the previous educator mentioned, former slave owners tried to continue to force labor out of black people. There were two ways in which this was accomplished in the late-nineteenth and...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2017 3:11 pm UTC

2 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

Ex-slaves resisted working for wages after emancipation for several reasons. One reason was the former slaves were used to having all of their basic needs taken care of by the plantation owner....

Latest answer posted September 29, 2015 8:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

This is a controversial topic. The fact is that the KKK is able to meet and be protected under the law. The first amendment provides freedom of religion, speech, and the press. So, all people and...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2015 1:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

One would hope that the Ku Klux Klan did not define "Americanism" per se, as a whole. But unfortunately it did represent that part of Americanism that has, from the beginning 400 years ago, been...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2018 5:11 am UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

Your question asks whether African-Americans were better off AFTER Reconstruction than they were before the Civil War. Most unfortunately, the answer to this question is neither straightforward nor...

Latest answer posted January 17, 2018 4:15 pm UTC

2 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The Freedman's Bureau was a federal agency created immediately after the Civil War to help the South's ex-slaves by giving them educational opportunities, health care, and job training. The...

Latest answer posted September 22, 2016 1:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) had a resurgence in the 1920s. Its resurgence came about because of changes to society that made American society more modern. The KKK was based largely on a desire to have...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2013 3:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The Freedmen's Bureau was established by the United States government near the end of the Civil War. As the war was drawing to a close, the U.S. government realized that they would need to provide...

Latest answer posted October 27, 2018 5:29 pm UTC

2 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

Consider the words of one "Colonel" William Joseph Simmons. Seeking to develop the resurgence of the Klan in the 1920s, Simmons became a prominent voice of the movement and the group's goals....

Latest answer posted December 2, 2012 4:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

At Abraham Lincoln's instigation, Congress established the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, informally known as the Freedmen's Bureau, on March 3, 1865. This was just two months...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2019 8:00 pm UTC

2 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The role of the Freedmen's Bureau changed over time. In the immediate aftermath of the war, the Bureau was primarily responsible for providing freed slaves with food, medical care, and living...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2012 2:37 am UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

Reconstruction had mixed effects on southern African Americans. Initially, Reconstruction gave African Americans the right to vote. However, the right to vote was later curtailed through the Black...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2017 8:38 am UTC

3 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The first of the three acts was passed in March of 1870. The Enforcement Acts were: criminal codes that protected blacks' right to vote, hold office, serve on juries, and receive equal protection...

Latest answer posted May 16, 2010 6:40 am UTC

2 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

In general the 1920s were the high point of membership and power of the KKK, although from the beginning of the decade to the end there was a decline, so the answer would be both true and false,...

Latest answer posted March 30, 2010 5:42 pm UTC

4 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

With the exception of a short time during Reconstruction, life for African Americans in the South did not change that much, particularly in the economic and political realms. Politically and...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2012 6:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

It is improbable that former Confederate cavalryman Nathan Bedford Forrest personally and singularly founded the Ku Klux Klan. He may well have been an early member and, possibly, even its first...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2012 12:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The Freedmen's Bureau helped to reform education in the South mainly by helping to create a system of public education in that region. Before the Civil War, there was very little in the way of...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2011 6:07 am UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

One reason African Americans did not achieve full freedom after the Civil War was they really lost their right to vote. Though the 15th Amendment states that the right to vote cannot be denied on...

Latest answer posted September 22, 2011 7:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

Many factors affected the 1920s KKK. More black people migrated to Northern cities, which led to a resurgence of anti-black racism. Race riots in St. Louis and other cities led to fears among...

Latest answer posted February 29, 2020 6:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The first, and most obvious, way that life changed for African-Americans after the Civil War was that slavery came to an end. Millions of people that had been the property of Southern planters were...

Latest answer posted May 21, 2016 3:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The major change in the lives of African-Americans after the Civil War resulted from the end of slavery. With the Confederacy in ruins, slavery was outlawed with the Thirteenth Amendment, ratified...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2016 8:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

In opposition to federal agencies such as the Freedman's Bureau, the Ku Klux Klan was born of ex-Confederate soldiers in Pulaski, Tennessee 1866. Interestingly, its first leader referred to as the...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2012 12:17 pm UTC

3 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

There was much societal discontent in the South following the end of the Civil War, and within a few years a group of Confederate veterans joined forces to create the Ku Klux Klan in Pulaski,...

Latest answer posted May 18, 2019 6:28 pm UTC

2 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

Opposition groups, in the form of oppositional news publications, leftist organizations, labor unions, and community defense organizations certainly contributed to the fall of the 1920s iteration...

Latest answer posted February 29, 2020 7:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

When talking about the Ku Klux Klan (better known as the KKK), we need to distinguish between two versions of it. The KKK was strong in the South during the Reconstruction era. It was strong...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2013 3:46 am UTC

2 educator answers

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

Of these options, the best is C. A major goal of the KKK was to prevent African Americans from voting. The KKK was organized mainly to destroy the power of the Republican Party in the South. Once...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2011 6:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

Although the Thirteenth Amendment ended slavery, the Fourteenth made Black Americans citizens and gave them equality before the law, and the Fifteenth insured their right to vote, the...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2012 12:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

During its short existence (from 1865 to 1869) the Freedmen's Bureau provided crucial support to the immense population of freed slaves in the South at the end of the Civil War. In the immediate...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2012 6:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The KKK was a powerful force in the South immediately after the Civil War. The Klan burned black-owned businesses, churches, and schools—places where African Americans could gather together and...

Latest answer posted February 29, 2020 6:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The original Ku Klux Klan was founded on Christmas Eve, 1865. Established by Confederate veterans, it was one of many organizations founded with the purpose of defending Southern society (i.e....

Latest answer posted August 8, 2012 2:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The Freedmen’s Bureau was created after the Civil War ended to help the former slaves. The former slaves had little experience with freedom. Many of them had been born into slavery. They had no...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2016 8:48 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

While the Civil War, and more specifically the 13th Amendment, ended legalized slavery in the United States and gave approximately 4 million former slaves their freedom, it did not mean that the...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2019 2:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) are a white supremacist group that emerged in the American South in the years after the Civil War (c. 1865). Initially, the KKK was formed by a small number of former...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2016 10:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

African Americans in the Post–Civil War Era

If the year in this question is correct, this has the potential to be a trick question. The Ku Klux Klan was not formally established until 1867 when a general organization convention was held. By...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2015 3:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer