A Mystery of Heroism Questions and Answers

A Mystery of Heroism

In Stephen Crane’s story “A Mystery of Heroism,” Fred Collins shows that he is a true hero because he risks his life in an effort to help other people. Fred goes for water not just for himself but...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2021 7:40 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Mystery of Heroism

The title of Stephen Crane's first published war story, "A Mystery of Heroism," is also the theme of the story. Crane's theory here is that heroism is a mystery rather than a deliberate choice or...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2014 5:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

By using personification, Stephen Crane gives agency to the war overall and to the battles in particular. By writing as if the events are playing human roles or have human feelings, Crane makes it...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2019 5:05 am UTC

3 educator answers

A Mystery of Heroism

In the first sentence, Crane employs a metaphor to describe the fighting between the two armies; he calls it "incessant wrestling." The armies, of course, are not actually wrestling, but this...

Latest answer posted February 23, 2019 9:45 pm UTC

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A Mystery of Heroism

The most important piece of symbolism in this short story is of course the bucket of water that Collins risks life and limb to go and fetch. Of course, on the one hand, the bucket represents the...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2013 5:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

A battle is raging around Fred Collins, and he wants a drink of water from the well in the middle of the battlefield. When he brings up the idea of going to get some water, the other soldiers with...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2015 12:32 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

This is an interesting question. I've never thought the duck trouser detail was anything more than Stephen Crane putting in a specific, real detail. Duck cloth is a heavy, plain-woven cotton...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2019 6:44 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Mystery of Heroism

Stephen Crane's word choice does indeed create a frightful and intense mood and atmosphere for readers in this story. Crane's dark and foreboding word choice starts right from the opening...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2018 3:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

In the opening paragraph of "A Mystery of Heroism," Crane's narrator describes the sky as blue, the firing of artillery as streaks of red against the sky, and the white duck trousers of the...

Latest answer posted November 26, 2017 10:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

"A Mystery of Heroism" is set against the backdrop of the Civil War. Collins, the protagonist, is a member of A Company, which is pinned down on the side of a hill by the relentless onslaught of...

Latest answer posted February 1, 2016 10:49 am UTC

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A Mystery of Heroism

The quote that this question is asking about appears a little more than halfway through the story. Fred Collins finally gets permission from an officer to go get the water, and Fred begins to move...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2019 12:48 pm UTC

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A Mystery of Heroism

For some reason, the soldier Collins decides that because he is thirsty, he will cross the field that is riddled with shells where there is apparently a well near the house that is now dilapidated...

Latest answer posted December 9, 2014 10:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

In Stephen Crane's short story "A Mystery of Heroism," Fred Collins crosses a battlefield in order to obtain a drink of water from a well. He does this, he says, because he is thirsty. This seems...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2021 1:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

The story is in the third person omniscient point of view. The story is about a young soldier named Fred Collins. Fred Collins, of A Company, was saying: “Thunder! I wisht I had a drink. Ain’t...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2015 4:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

At first, I think Collins's motive to go get some water from the well is simply that he is very thirsty. It would make sense, of course, as he is in the middle of a terrible battle, that he would...

Latest answer posted December 9, 2019 10:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

Fred Collins in “A Mystery of Heroism” finds himself and his other soldiers pinned down by a battle raging around them. Collins decides he is thirsty and sees a well in the middle of the...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2015 12:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

"A Mystery of Heroism" is really all about what the title suggests: it looks at what heroism really is and explores how it is a mystery. The story therefore, and the brave (and perhaps reckless)...

Latest answer posted October 12, 2012 6:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

Readers are not told what rank Collins is. We are told the rank of a few other soldiers around Collins, and they are privates, so it makes sense that Collins is also a private. It is possible that...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2019 4:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

In "A Mystery of Heroism" the bucket of water is a very important symbol in two respects. Firstly, it represents heroism. Fred Collins shows extraordinary courage in going off to fetch the bucket...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2018 1:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

I know the video that you are talking about. It was made in 1977, and it was done in black and white. It is possible that the filmmaker chose to make Fred Collins a Confederate soldier, because...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2016 1:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Mystery of Heroism

It's ironic that Fred should want water at the start of the story as he'll soon volunteer to risk life and limb to fetch water for his comrades. In a classic example of situational irony, the...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2020 11:26 am UTC

1 educator answer