London, 1802 Questions and Answers

London, 1802

Shifting towards a more conservative outlook, Wordsworth appears patriotic and moralistic in this poem. He addresses Milton, pleading for the deceased poet to return and be an example of virtue for...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2018 5:53 pm UTC

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London, 1802

I think that one can turn to some of the opening lines of the poem in order to fully grasp where the speaker's admiration of Milton lies. The speaker, presumably Wordsworth, believes that the...

Latest answer posted December 18, 2011 7:02 pm UTC

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London, 1802

Certainly, the phrase "fen of stagnant waters" carries quite a negative connotation. A fen is an area that is mostly or wholly covered with water, where water can pool and sort of go rancid and...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2019 11:20 pm UTC

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London, 1802

This colorful simile reveals the high regard in which Wordsworth holds Milton. By saying that Milton's soul was "like a star, and dwelt apart", he is expressing his firm belief that Milton, both as...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2020 10:37 am UTC

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London, 1802

This excellent poem contains a number of different examples of figurative language. I will pick out two examples, but I hope that reading my examples will encourage you to go back and analyse the...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2011 7:15 pm UTC

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London, 1802

According to the speaker, England ought to have inherited "the heroic wealth of hall and bower" and the "ancient English dower / Of inward happiness." It is a country of mythic heroes, culture, and...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2019 2:13 am UTC

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London, 1802

In the first octet (eight lines) of this sonnet, Wordsworth says that the three cultural institutions of "altar, sword, and pen" have become stagnant in England. By this, he means that the church,...

Latest answer posted November 20, 2019 5:53 pm UTC

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London, 1802

In the poem "London, 1802" by William Wordsworth, the poet presents a symbolic problem and a real problem, both of which are related. The symbolic problem is that the great poet John Milton is...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2020 1:25 am UTC

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London, 1802

In William Wordsworth’s poem “London, 1802,” the speaker famously begins by proclaiming, Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour; England hath need of thee . . . . Why does the speaker begin...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2012 12:47 pm UTC

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London, 1802

Wordsworth's poem is an apostrophe to the great English poet, John Milton. It is written as a sonnet: Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour: England hath need of thee: she is a fen Of...

Latest answer posted June 24, 2009 5:08 pm UTC

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London, 1802

In this poem, the speaker is longing for what he he considers to be England's Golden Age, the Enlightenment. This is the theme of the poem. The Enlightenment is widely defined as the years between...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2012 3:50 pm UTC

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London, 1802

In the poem "London, 1802," Wordsworth is scathingly critical of the city of London and of the English in general. He says that the city is "a fen / Of stagnant waters" and that the English have...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2021 11:27 am UTC

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London, 1802

William Wordsworth uses his poem “London, 1802” to lament the loss of virtue and values that he has seen in British society. There are several things he mentions in particular, bemoaning their...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2019 9:28 pm UTC

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London, 1802

In the poem "London, 1802" by William Wordsworth, the "Milton" referred to in the first line is the famous British poet John Milton. He had a profound impact on English poetry and is considered a...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2019 2:33 am UTC

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London, 1802

To discuss how William Wordsworth’s use of structure helps convey the theme of “London, 1802,” try to identify the main theme first. The primary theme appears to be related to decay and...

Latest answer posted June 24, 2021 6:40 pm UTC

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London, 1802

I think that "London, 1802" does contain a healthy dose of nostalgia. The speaker, presumably Wordsworth, is longing for the days of John Milton to change what England is into what is used to be....

Latest answer posted October 31, 2011 6:36 pm UTC

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London, 1802

According to the poem, Wordsworth seems dismayed by the degeneration of the people of London in 1802. He specifically states that all aspects of the spirit of the people are in a troubled state. He...

Latest answer posted October 30, 2011 12:48 pm UTC

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London, 1802

It seems to me that the fundamental issue in the poem is Wordsworth's claim that there is a need for an "awakening" that can only be provided through the likes of thinkers like Milton. Wordsworth...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2011 7:14 pm UTC

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