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  • 1984
    George Orwell, in his futuristic dystopian novel 1984, creates a language called "newspeak" which epitomizes the style and manner of thinking of totalitarian regimes. The goal of "newspeak" within...

    Asked by jallen10 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In 1984, the police patrol uses helicopters to carry out its task. These helicopters can hover in between buildings in order to allow the police to look in through people's windows. Snooping allows...

    Asked by user8729811 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    While the party maintains that it operates for the good of society, Winston and the people of Oceania suffer at the hands of the party on a daily basis. In the opening paragraphs of the book, for...

    Asked by yeseniatorres902 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    The novel, 1984, is split into three parts and each of these parts contains important events. In the first part, for example, Winston's internal fear of the party begins to dissipate and he...

    Asked by danigashi66 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    Winston despises Julia early in Part One of 1984—before he even knows her name—for a number of reasons. He hates her because he hates all young women who are Party members. With their sashes...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    Modernism in art and literature in the first half of the twentieth century has often been related to the rise of the city and the machine, and to a fascination with the automated, the mechanized,...

    Asked by andrewtse169 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • 1984
    The Party uses surveillance, thought control, endless war, and endless propaganda to control Party members in 1984. As we learn early in the novel, the television screen in every one's apartment...

    Asked by user4118247 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In 1984, Syme is one of Winston's colleagues at the Ministry of Truth. Winston describes him as a "friend" and as a person whose company he genuinely enjoys. Winston is concerned, however, that...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    2 educator answers

  • 1984
    In 1984, war is a constant presence in the lives of the people of Oceania. It is used by the party in two important ways. First of all, war is used to increase people's loyalty towards the party....

    Asked by angelatheastronaut on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    The government in 1984 demands that no tension exists between inward and outward conformity. The state insists not only on outward obedience to its laws and dictates but that its citizens' minds...

    Asked by lildpeaceout on via web

    3 educator answers

  • 1984
    In Part One, Chapter Two, the reader learns that an execution is due to take place that evening in the park: Some Eurasian prisoners, guilty of war crimes, were to be hanged...This happened about...

    Asked by tannerb26 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In 1984, we see very differing attitudes to intimacy in the characters of Julia and Katharine, both of whom play an important role in Winston's life. Katharine is Winston's wife and she appears in...

    Asked by carlojoyce0454 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In 1984, Julia is Winston's girlfriend and his co-conspirator against Big Brother and the party. While Winston is an idealist and thinker who seeks to bring down the party for the sake of humanity,...

    Asked by user5746253 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    You would probably address the letter to Big Brother. According to the novel, Big Brother may or may not exist as a human being. In Winston's conversation with O'Brien, Winston asks about Big...

    Asked by onatyapici on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    One of the very fascinating effects of a well-run totalitarian regime seems to always be the work that goes into breaking down typical family and community relationships. In East Germany and in...

    Asked by user4285224 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    For Winston, his relationship with Julia is problematic because it violates party rules. As a result, every moment he spends with her is fraught with insecurity and prevents him from being truly...

    Asked by user7372944 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In 1984 and Fahrenheit 451 authoritarian states practice mind control over their citizens. In Fahrenheit 451, the government has banned books and the central character, Montag, works as "fireman"...

    Asked by haziqahmadaziz2233 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    Eric Arthur Blair (who wrote 1984 and his other works under the pen name George Orwell) was a 19th-century English author and journalist. Blair was born in India. He later moved to Europe to become...

    Asked by fatimashokor98765432 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In 1984, the Party socially controls its citizens through many means. Despite there being no laws, the Party annihilates anyone whose thoughts or actions are rebellious or indicate that they have...

    Asked by user5170922 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    The oppressive, totalitarian government of 1984 is governed by a set of principles known as "Ingsoc," which means English socialism in the constructed language of the Party, Newspeak. The...

    Asked by user4351718 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    While Julia and Winston are complementary characters in some circumstances, such as their their rebellion against the Party, they do have their own views. This doesn't make one or the other right...

    Asked by oduksy10 on via web

  • 1984
    In 1984, Winston finds a piece of coral encased in glass in an old junk shop. It's a paperweight, and to him, it represents the time before the Party came into power, a time Winston dimly remembers...

    Asked by ndaneric on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In George Orwell's dystopian classic 1984, protagonist Winston Smith purchases a diary and begins recording his secret thoughts therein. As a literary convention, Winston's diary entries help move...

    Asked by user254212 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • 1984
    The society in George Orwell's 1984 is an anti-individualistic society. People engage in group-think rather than forming their own thoughts and opinions, because self-expression is illegal....

    Asked by user7132145 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Romeo and Juliet
    Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet and Orwell's 1984 are both stories of forbidden love, among other things. In Shakespeare's play, the two young lovers are members of fighting families and they must...

    Asked by user9917002 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In 1984, this quote appears when Winston is relating to Julia a dream that he had about his mother. In this dream, Winston returns to his childhood and relives the last day he spent with his mother...

    Asked by mel123ina on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In 1984, a telescreen is a dual-purpose device: it broadcasts party propaganda to the people of Oceania while also watching and recording their every move. As such, the telescreens are located in a...

    Asked by nadeenali12 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    This sounds like a great assignment! My one caution would be to provide students with a rubric that clarifies whether or not they will be graded on elements such as style/diction, or simply on...

    Asked by user4463129 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • 1984
    I love the idea of a post–Room 101 interview with Winston—the book’s actual ending is haunting, of course, but I think that exploring what happens after Winston’s conversion is a great way...

    Asked by user9058249 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In Part Three, Chapter One of 1984, there are two people from Winston's life who are thrown into his cell. The first is Ampleforth, a poet and co-worker of Winston's, who worked in the Records...

    Asked by herrerabrezza on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    The key words are: indoctrination and manipulation. Indoctrination and manipulation, as every reader of 1984 knows, are the key strategies of the Party to maintain control of the population. This...

    Asked by ellensohn on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    Doublethink is the practice of accepting two opposing ideas at the same time. In 1984, we see this clearly during Winston's ordeal in the Ministry of Love. In Part Three, Chapter Two, O'Brien...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    2 educator answers

  • 1984
    There are two themes that relate well to George Orwell's 1984 and Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five. The first theme is the destructiveness of war on a society. In 1984, Oceania exists in a...

    Asked by smh98 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    Rats symbolize Winston’s biggest fear. He has an unnatural terror of them. We first witness this in the “shabby little room” above Mr. Charrington’s shop. Julia casually mentions seeing a...

    Asked by brown487 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • 1984
    Winston could be called the "last artist" in 1984 for several reasons. First, he is old enough to have memories from the time before the Party came into power. He recalls, for example, fragments of...

    Asked by lilili226 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In Book 2, Chapter 7, Julia says: "It's the one thing they can't do. They can make you say anything -- anything -- but they can't make you believe it. They can't get inside you." What Julia means...

    Asked by cripnation3911 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    To write a clear thesis statement about Big Brother, you need to understand the role Big Brother plays in the novel. George Orwell's 1984 never answers the question of whether or not Big Brother is...

    Asked by ashlynnweaver79 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In 1984, Winston's dream function as an expression of repressed memories. In Part One, Chapter Three, for example, Winston dreams of her disappearance when he was a young boy. This dream reminds...

    Asked by amnamann on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In Part 1, Chapter 1 of 1984, Winston sees the three party slogans etched on to the building of the Ministry of Truth. These are: WAR IS PEACE FREEDOM IS SLAVERY IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH To the...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In my copy of 1984 (Penguin, London, 1990), you will find this quote on pages 41-42, though it may be slightly different in yours. Either way, this quote appears in Part 1, Chapter 4 of the book,...

    Asked by yoloislife on via web

    2 educator answers

  • 1984
    According to Gordon State College, there are a number of elements which define a dystopian novel like 1984. One of these is the portrayal of a "hierarchical society" in which class divisions...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    2 educator answers

  • 1984
    One of the ideas prevalent in 1984 is the idea of the government controlling the people. When Winston is talking to Julia about the war, she expresses the opinion that it is not real. “The...

    Asked by user5708261 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    The old-fashioned clock serves three purposes in 1984. First, it helps create a sense of a new or very different world in the mind of the reader. Most readers at the time the book was published...

    Asked by user9518949 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • 1984
    At the beginning of 1984, Winston Smith is a low level bureaucrat who makes his living altering historical records at the Ministry of Truth. Though an unassuming man, he is keenly aware of the...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In Part Two, Chapter Two, Winston heads out of town and into the countryside where he has arranged to meet with the dark-haired girl, Julia. Waiting for her to arrive, Winston finds himself...

    Asked by bert1234 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In 1984, Winston receives the briefcase with 'the book' inside on Sunday, the day before Hate Week begins. We know this because he tells us that on the fifth day of Hate Week he has had the book in...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In this chapter of 1984, Julia raises some important ideas about the party which come as a surprise to Winston because they represent, to him, a completely different way of thinking. First of all,...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    According to the Party, Emmanuel Goldstein was a former member who left to form what is referred to in hushed tones as the "Brotherhood," a sort of dissident organization. Goldstein, as a former...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In Part 1, Chapter 8 of 1984, Winston follows an old man into a pub. As soon as he enters, he looks around for a telescreen: "It was horribly dangerous, but at any rate there was no telescreen in...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • 1984
    In George Orwell’s 1984, we know for certain that Jones, Rutherford, and Aaronson were early leaders of the Revolution. We also know that they were tortured because they came to be seen as...

    Asked by zbevis8 on via web

    1 educator answer

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