Questions and Answers for 1984

1984

In Orwell's classic novel 1984, War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, and Ignorance is Strength are the Party's three paradoxical slogans, which are perfect examples of how the ruling government uses...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2020 10:59 am UTC

3 educator answers

1984

The four ministries in George Orwell's 1984 are the Ministries of Truth, Love, Peace, and Plenty. They are all named for positive values that are meant to be beneficial to society, but, in reality,...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2019 12:17 pm UTC

6 educator answers

1984

When Winston Smith writes this line in his secret diary, he is saying that freedom means having the ability to assert objective truths. The made-up Ingsoc ideology that 2+2=5 represents the way...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2021 3:43 pm UTC

5 educator answers

1984

In George Orwell’s 1949 novel of a dystopian society ruled by “Big Brother,” 1984, the four government ministries to which the story refers are the Ministries of Truth, Love, Peace, and Plenty. As...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2014 7:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

1984

The Junior Spies is a government organization concentrated on indoctrinating children into the Party's socialist ideology. The primary objective of the organization is to create a loyal, orthodox...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2020 1:03 pm UTC

4 educator answers

1984

The Two Minutes Hate is a break in the day in which Party members briefly stop their work routines and gather in front of a screen in order to participate in an intense expression of hatred against...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2020 1:03 pm UTC

5 educator answers

1984

It is in Part One, Chapter Three of 1984 that you can find the following quote about controlling the past: "Who controls the past," ran the Party slogan, "controls the future: who controls the...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2016 5:14 pm UTC

3 educator answers

1984

When citing sources it is important to cite them in two different ways; an in-text citation within the body of your paper and on the works cited page at the end of your paper. When citing a novel...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2015 2:45 am UTC

3 educator answers

1984

It’s highly probable George Orwell wrote 1984 with more than one message in mind. Other Educators have discussed messages connected to oppressive regimes and totalitarianism. Another central...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2021 4:25 pm UTC

4 educator answers

1984

Everything isn't alright for Winston at the end of 1984; far from it. Broken and brainwashed, he has effectively been tortured into loving Big Brother. And because he's been brainwashed, he no...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2020 10:58 am UTC

4 educator answers

1984

This particular quote serves as an illustration, provided by O'Brien, to better clarify the core motivation which ultimately lies behind this entire dystopian world as envisioned by Orwell. Indeed,...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2020 6:46 am UTC

4 educator answers

1984

This is a much-quoted statement, viewed as a commentary upon the commitment of people to the status quo, even when that status quo is effectively abusive. Winston feels that the only solution to...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2018 9:17 am UTC

2 educator answers

1984

Winston occasionally dreams about the Golden Country, and once, when he is with Julia in the countryside, comes upon a real landscape that almost (but not quite) lives up to his dream. Later, in...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2020 6:02 am UTC

3 educator answers

1984

There is a great character description and analysis for each character in the novel on eNotes, so I will post Katharine's here for your convenience. Katharine is "Winston’s wife. She was a tall,...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2014 9:34 pm UTC

2 educator answers

1984

Like so many people in Oceania, Jones, Aaronson, and Rutherford have been crushed beneath the wheels of the totalitarian system. Once upon a time, they were fanatical Party leaders during the...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2021 10:37 am UTC

3 educator answers

1984

The Anti-Junior Sex League is a Party organization working for replacing sex with artificial insemination. Julia is a part of the group, but only as a cover—she is pro-actively interested in sex...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2018 2:12 pm UTC

2 educator answers

1984

A page number can change based on the edition you are using, but the quote appears in part I, chapter 4 of the text. In my Signet edition, it is on page 36 and reads as follows: As short a time...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2017 4:31 am UTC

2 educator answers

1984

Similarities • Both Winston and Julia are rebellious towards the Party and go against the laws that govern thought and action • They both desire each other and engage in a covert affair...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2015 7:34 am UTC

3 educator answers

1984

Winston and Julia have just awakened from another evening spent in the "secret" room above Charrington's shop. Winston is thinking about the implications of Goldstein's book, which he has almost...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2017 4:34 am UTC

3 educator answers

1984

As with the names of the other ministries in Oceania, the name Ministry of Truth means the opposite of what it says. If the Ministry of Love is the place of torture and hate, the Ministry of Truth...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2016 9:24 pm UTC

4 educator answers

1984

The Parsons represent what is supposed to be the middle class since they are in an apartment. In his depiction of them, George Orwell demonstrates how the basic unit of society, the family, has had...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2015 4:23 am UTC

2 educator answers

1984

In Chapter One of 1984, Winston writes in his newly-purchased diary for the first time. This diary is used by Winston as a tool for self-expression because, under Party rule, Winston is not allowed...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2017 10:16 am UTC

2 educator answers

1984

The chestnut tree is often understood as a symbol of justice and honesty. We also hear the phrase "an old chestnut" to describe a story that has been repeated many times. More specifically, Orwell...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2016 1:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

1984

"Orthodoxy means not thinking—not needing to think. Orthodoxy is unconsciousness" (Orwell 68). While Syme is explaining to Winston the significance of Newspeak, he comments on how language will...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2017 9:30 am UTC

2 educator answers

1984

In Part One, Chapter Four, while at work, Winston is tasked with writing a man called Comrade Withers out of history. (Withers has been vaporised and is now considered to be an enemy of the Party)....

Latest answer posted February 7, 2017 9:42 am UTC

2 educator answers

1984

Ingsoc is short for English Socialism, and the shortening of the word into two basically meaningless syllables is itself significant. Ingsoc is a word that can mean whatever the Party wants it to...

Latest answer posted September 22, 2017 4:22 pm UTC

2 educator answers

1984

To find a physical description of Winston Smith, take a look at Part One, Chapter One. In the third paragraph, Orwell informs us that Winston is "smallish" and has a "frail figure." He has "fair...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2017 8:40 am UTC

3 educator answers

1984

The purpose of the telescreens in Orwell's popular dystopian novel 1984 is to constantly monitor, control, and oppress the population of Oceania. The Party uses the telescreens to assert its...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2021 11:13 am UTC

5 educator answers

1984

In 1984, the Brotherhood is the name of the secret organization whose role is to bring down the Party. In Part Two, Chapter Eight, when Winston and Julia are at O'Brien's apartment, the reader gets...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2016 10:24 am UTC

2 educator answers

1984

Room 101 was the place where the worst thing in the world was found. Winston had previously asked O’Brien to tell him what exactly was in the room because he noticed that all the prisoners who had...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2015 12:52 pm UTC

3 educator answers

1984

The quotation "a place where there is no darkness" occurs twice in George Orwell's "1984." That is certainly no accident, given Orwell's writing style and his portrayal of life in a totalitarian...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2013 4:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

1984

In 1984, the world is divided into three states: Oceania, Eastasia, and Eurasia. Oceania is constantly at war with one of these states while at peace with the other. For the majority of the book,...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2016 9:01 am UTC

2 educator answers

1984

The children in 1984 are taught to love the government of their own country. All their loyalty, energy, and obedience is directed toward their leaders. Anyone who threatens the state is a threat to...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2020 2:35 am UTC

4 educator answers

1984

Love and marriage are extremely important to the Party, in a negative sense. In other words, they see love and the sort of marriage based on love as inherently subversive forces and attempt to...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2016 10:33 am UTC

2 educator answers

1984

This is a very important statement in the novel. When Winston states that "we are the dead," it follows a statement that speaks more to Winston's above assertion. Winston insists that "She did...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2010 9:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

1984

We only see Julia through Winston's eyes, so what happens to her in many ways remains mysterious. We know she approaches Winston for an affair, they fall in love, and that both promise not to...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2021 10:43 am UTC

4 educator answers

1984

For an example of a simile, take a look at the first chapter of the book in which Winston is describing the appearance of the telescreen: The voice came from an oblong metal plaque like a dulled...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2017 6:20 pm UTC

2 educator answers

1984

Winston has only hazy, dreamlike memories of his mother and sister. In reality, there's no evidence he murdered her: she and his sister disappeared one day after he snatched a small piece of...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2016 9:04 pm UTC

3 educator answers

1984

As one of the previous answers pointed out, Winston has been changed from the rebellious individual into a completely obedient and subservient member of the party. This change in some ways mimics...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2015 2:50 am UTC

3 educator answers

1984

In the novel 1984, INGSOC is an acronym for "English Socialism," which is the political philosophy adopted by Oceania's ruling Socialist Party. Orwell writes that the principles of INGSOC are...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2017 11:17 pm UTC

2 educator answers

1984

First mentioned in Chapter Four of George Orwell’s novel of a futuristic dystopian society, 1984, a “speakwrite” is apparently some form of dictation system, in which a user speaks into it and his...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2014 7:47 pm UTC

2 educator answers

1984

The central conflict in 1984 is man versus society, personified in Winston Smith's struggle against Big Brother's oppressive regime. Winston represents freedom, both physical and intellectual. He...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2020 12:36 pm UTC

4 educator answers

1984

Choosing the most important events of 1984 clearly involves the interpretation the reader; however, in selecting these the reader can look for events that have significant consequences. From this...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2015 7:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

1984

This is taken from a nursery rhyme of the time Orwell was growing up ("The Chestnut Tree" by Glen Miller 1939), much like he took the line "oranges and lemons say the bells of St. Clements." The...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2008 10:18 am UTC

3 educator answers

1984

The uniform of the Party is the blue overalls that are worn by men and women alike. The overalls are worn by both inner Party members, like O'Brien, and outer Party members, such as Julia and...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2020 5:40 pm UTC

5 educator answers

1984

As mentioned in the previous post, Winston believes that the only hope to destroy the Party was to awaken and unite the overwhelming mass of proles to revolt against Big Brother. Unlike the Inner...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2016 10:50 pm UTC

2 educator answers

1984

In 1984, Winston dreams about a few things. One of his dreams features a dark-haired woman running toward Winston. Winston sees it as an act of freedom and Party defiance. This is going to sound...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2015 2:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

1984

In the first stage of Winston's reintegration in the Ministry of Love, he is physically tortured and forced to confess to imaginary crimes against the Party. Party intellectuals continually...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2020 12:53 pm UTC

4 educator answers

1984

The way in which the government in this future dystopia keeps control over its people is through a combination of manipulation and fear. There is of course the ever-present threat of the Thought...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2013 5:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

1984

Winston and Julia meet at the Ministry of Truth or Minitrue, where they both work. They keep eyeing each other obliquely. Winston doesn't know her name, but calls her the "dark-haired girl." He...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2016 10:42 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Showing 1-50 of 1936