How can a topic sentence effectively introduce the title and author of a book?

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Regardless of the length of a paper, the topic sentence sets the tone for the entire paper. The topic sentence is the first sentence of the paper, but each paragraph has its own topic sentence as well. When writing about a specific book or other source, the easiest and most...

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Regardless of the length of a paper, the topic sentence sets the tone for the entire paper. The topic sentence is the first sentence of the paper, but each paragraph has its own topic sentence as well. When writing about a specific book or other source, the easiest and most effective way to begin your paper is to name the book (or other source), the author, and something relevant about the book as it relates to your paper.

For example:

The Great Depression was full of loneliness and internal anguish for those who struggled to obtain steady work, a point well illustrated in John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men.

Lord of the Flies, a classic novel by William Golding, is filled with conflict between civilization and savagery, a war oftentimes waged within the minds of the characters of the book.

Victor Hugo's novel Les Miserables explores many aspects of life that affect the world today, but none more so than his tackling of human rights and social justice.

As you can see, the method you choose to build your sentence structure can be adjusted to fit your own style of writing, so don't feel locked into a single way of introducing your topic or its source. Whether you are talking about major themes in a book or simply listing characters in paragraph form, utilizing different techniques to introduce sources will prevent your paper from feeling repetitive when you have multiple sources and will help your paper stand out from your peers' when teachers grade them.

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A topic sentence is the first sentence in a paragraph, a sentence in which you let the reader know the topic the paragraph is going to be about, the point you want to make.  If you are writing just one paragraph about a book, it is best to introduce the title of the book and the author's name in the topic sentence.  But you also need to let the reader know what you are going to be saying about the book.  You don't want to just say, "This is a paragraph about this book by this author." 

So, how you write the topic sentence is going to depend on what the main idea is that you want to share with the reader about the book.  You might want to say what the theme of the book is or that one of the characters is important for some reason. You may want to say that the book taught you about some particular topic. Here are some examples of topic sentences that introduce books and authors:

Malcolm Gladwell's Blink explains a great deal about our intuitions.

"The Lottery," by Shirley Jackson, is a story about a village with a frightening and horrible ritual.

In The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the reader sees everything that happens through the eyes of Nick, the narrator.

This is how we introduce the title, the author, and the main idea we are going to discuss in the paragraph.  No matter what book or story you are going to write about, you can do this, too.  Just decide what the point is that you want to make in the paragraph.

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