To which two characters from Paradise Lost does the Creature compare himself in Frankenstein?

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In chapter 10, the creature pleads with Victor:

Remember, that I am thy creature; I ought to be thy Adam, but I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed.

In this reference to Paradise Lost , the creature is referring to the Biblical...

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In chapter 10, the creature pleads with Victor:

Remember, that I am thy creature; I ought to be thy Adam, but I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed.

In this reference to Paradise Lost, the creature is referring to the Biblical Adam. Adam lived in perfect harmony with God as the first man God created. Because of his disobedience, God both kicked him out of the Garden of Eden and forced him to work the land in physical labor, suffering the effects of his sin. The fallen angel refers to Satan, who Biblically wanted to rise above God instead of serve him. As punishment, God cast him out of Heaven as a "fallen angel."

The creature aligns himself with Adam as he is Frankenstein's creation; he is the man whom Frankenstein created. However, he did not disobey his master but has nonetheless been dismissed from his realm. He feels more like the "fallen angel" who has been cast aside in punishment, indicating rejection. While Adam was punished in loving correction, Satan was dismissed from God's presence entirely. Likewise, Frankenstein has not attempted to nurture or even correct the behaviors he finds intolerable in the creature he's created; he simply dismisses him to another world, out of sight.

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The Creature compares himself to both Adam and Satan, though he relates to the latter more than the former due to his loneliness and envy of those who get to live normal, happy lives.

Like Adam, the Creature was created without being asked if he wished to exist. However, the Creature is a perverse version of Adam, created by a mortal instead of God and forsaken by his creator even before he had a chance to fall into sin. Like Adam, he longs for a mate, but unlike Adam, his Eve is destroyed before they can ever be together.

Like Satan, the Creature rebels against his creator, though here the key difference is that the Creature was wronged by Victor while Satan was simply power-hungry and discontented with being subservient to God the Father. The Creature's rebelling against his creator seems more understandable, since Victor essentially left him for dead, while God the Father never meant Satan any wrong from the beginning.

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The creature compares himself to Adam as well as Satan from John Milton's epic poem, Paradise Lost, a text that he read (at first) as factual, a real history of the world's birth. He compares himself to Adam because he was created without a tie to any other human being; like Adam, he is the first of his kind. However, he feels his creator's cruelty when he makes this comparison because, unlike Adam, who was "a perfect creature," joyful and content, and especially close to his creator, the monster is miserable and lonely and spurned by his creator. At the same time, he feels more like Satan because, as he says, "like him, when I viewed the bliss of my protectors, the bitter gall of envy rose within me." In other words, when he sees the happiness of others, he is extremely jealous, and he feels bitterly toward those who are allotted this happiness when he is denied it through no fault of his own. For these reasons, he feels that he should be more like Adam, but due to his creator's errors, he is actually more like Satan.

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