To improve students' science literacy and knowledge, our school decides to increase quality live science demonstrations and experiments. ​ What resources (not monetary) do we need to increase live demonstrations and experiments?​ What data do we need to continuously evaluate this initiative?​

To increase the quality of live science demonstrations, educators might need more diverse materials, like Bunsen burners and voltmeters, more technology to share the experience with students, like screen sharing and projectors, and a larger space. To continuously evaluate the initiative, educators might survey students to assess comprehension and engagement. To do this, they would have to know what resources the school had before the initiative, what resources were added, and how many students attended demonstrations.

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There are many resources that educators could use to increase the quality of live science demonstrations and experiments. For instance, it is important to have a space that is large enough for lots of students to view and engage with the material. It would also be helpful to have lots...

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There are many resources that educators could use to increase the quality of live science demonstrations and experiments. For instance, it is important to have a space that is large enough for lots of students to view and engage with the material. It would also be helpful to have lots of different lab materials so that different types of experiments can be done.

For example, having access to chemistry equipment like beakers and Bunsen burners as well as equipment for physics like voltmeters and magnets would be ideal. To ensure that students follow along with the demonstrations, it might also be useful to have access to technology like projectors or screen sharing so that students can see what is going on in the experiment up close.

To continuously evaluate if the addition of new resources is increasing the quality of the demonstrations, educators might have to frequently survey students to assess comprehension and engagement. They could also survey educators doing the demonstrations to understand if they think the resources are helping or if they are in need of different ones. To keep up with how this initiative is going, it would be important to stay on top of what resources the school had to begin with, what resources were added, what demonstrations were done with the new resources, and how many students attended the demonstrations.

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